Communal Mutilans

micheldied

Arachnoprince
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Jan 25, 2009
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Does anyone know exactly why, while all other scolopendra sp. are solitary, Scolopendra Subspinipes Mutilans is communal?
Have any studies been done on their communal behavior in the wild or know any reasons behind it?
Just curious.
 

EMWhite

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 13, 2009
Messages
55
Hi!
I'm not sure specifically why any given species of centipede would be communal vs any other, though it may have to do with proximity to others in the wild, or perhaps an evolutionary advantage to living in groups (safety in numbers etc).

Though, I do think it bears mentioning that, while the communal list of centipedes far outmatches the non-communal ones, there are other species (even in the trade) that can "live together." I'd say also that communal is a loose term, and I'm not sure how much success any given person can have with groups of species and prolonged periods of time.

However, for all the people that say "communal" doesn't really apply to any species strictly, there seem to be that many who say they've had no issue. My point being, other species too are "communal" like Alipes grandidieri, and Ethmostigmus trigonopodus etc though only to a point...



Evan
 

micheldied

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
1,328
Hi!
I'm not sure specifically why any given species of centipede would be communal vs any other, though it may have to do with proximity to others in the wild, or perhaps an evolutionary advantage to living in groups (safety in numbers etc).

Though, I do think it bears mentioning that, while the communal list of centipedes far outmatches the non-communal ones, there are other species (even in the trade) that can "live together." I'd say also that communal is a loose term, and I'm not sure how much success any given person can have with groups of species and prolonged periods of time.

However, for all the people that say "communal" doesn't really apply to any species strictly, there seem to be that many who say they've had no issue. My point being, other species too are "communal" like Alipes grandidieri, and Ethmostigmus trigonopodus etc though only to a point...



Evan
I was referring to the scolopendra only, but yeah, I agree with what you say.
Mutilans, however, do share food, hides, and will even lay eggs in the proximity of others. Personal experiences.
I was wondering if any real studies have been done on their behavior in the wild.
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
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Jul 4, 2005
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8,991
Seems there was somebody from Asia on the ab that was involved with one of the centipede farms there. There is at least one old thread with Ytube links to the farm with 100's of 1000's of pedes living together, laying eggs in something like cinder blocks. Maybe you could find the thread and contact him, he might have some answers to your questions. I'm thinking it might have to do with an abundance of prey that is available there for them but I really have no clue.
 

micheldied

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 25, 2009
Messages
1,328
Seems there was somebody from Asia on the ab that was involved with one of the centipede farms there. There is at least one old thread with Ytube links to the farm with 100's of 1000's of pedes living together, laying eggs in something like cinder blocks. Maybe you could find the thread and contact him, he might have some answers to your questions. I'm thinking it might have to do with an abundance of prey that is available there for them but I really have no clue.
Oh yeah, I think I remember that guy.
I'll try to contact him.
 
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