Columbia River: WA/OR

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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Oct 20, 2008
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Here's a quantity of pics from a small gathering of local-ish bug/herp freaks. Bear with me...lots of stuff to sort through and I'll probably mangle a few IDs. Feel free to offer up a correct ID if so inclined.

Podabrus sp.(Soldier beetle)


Cerambycid(Long horn beetle)


Notonectid(Backsmimmer)


Pleocoma sp.(Rain beetle)


Mantis religiosa


Mystery true bug(???)


Argiope trifasciata...I could sleep on that satiny abdomen


Latrodectus hesperus


Mystery moth(???)


Collops bipunctatus



Elaphrus sp.


Phymata sp.(Ambush bugs)...females almost monochromatic, males with dark markings...they're almost invisible on their goldenrod host plant



Subfamily Lygaeinae(Milkweed bug nymphs)


Crayfish husk...not sure which for obvious reasons


Small mystery carabid
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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Bittacidae?


Mystery grasshopper?


Aesschna interrupta


Gerris remigis


Larropsis sp?


Another mystery grasshopper?


?


Coniontus sp?


More water boatman


The other M. religiosa color


Polistes dominulus?


More Latrodectus hesperus


?


Mystery ant?



Baby jumper
 
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Cbarr

Arachnosquire
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Apr 9, 2009
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68
Really nice pics especially the one of the baby jumper

c
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
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Nov 21, 2009
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Hey Man, Nice pics! Wishing I had more time to be afield. :clap:

Terry
 

Bugs In Cyberspace

Arachnodemon
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Joined
Dec 10, 2006
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Zon and party braved some seriously intense wind out there in the Gorge. Unfortunately, I forgot to bring my camera. Fortunately, I did bring my blacklight set-ups. Unfortunately, the wind was too strong to bother. Fortunately, the winds were much more calm on the other side of the river during daylight hours.

Lots of bugs were found and caught. A passing woman argued with me on the definition of the word "bugs" when she noticed I had a sweep net, and asked what we were after. I think I answered her question, and she answered a few I didn't even ask.

I will soon photograph the Litaneutria mantis that Ryan found. As expected, she has already produced a nice big (.75 cm) ootheca.

Three possible Parcoblatta americana roaches were also collected and will be offered a captive paradise in exchange for some offspring.

An assortment of five or so tenebrionids were also found. They varied significantly in size and shape.

I plan to snap a few photos of these captives and share them, but not before a quick trip out to the seashore this weekend.

That jumper is adorable and the clarity on some of the other shots, like the Polistes for example, is super! Zon, your photos are almost as great as the trip was. I initially thought those were cantharids, then blisters. Cantharids it is! Your fuzzy little beetle is too hairy and too small to be a Pleocoma. I've got a Pleocoma in the freezer I'll show you next time you're down. Yours is a bumblebee scarab in the genus Lichnanthe. I've seen them in the books as Rathvon's scarab, though I've never seen a living one. That's a GREAT find!

We really found some great stuff, didn't we? Thanks for putting the PNW on the map here on AB!

Ryan and I are planning an overnight up on the peninsula again, 'bout a month out.
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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Thanks for the kind words, folks. It's great to see some interest in the non-Theraphosids(although I appreciate them, too)

The "insects aren't bugs" lady did have a curiously large head & I could have sworn I saw mandibles when she started talking...maybe she has personal knowledge?

The Litaneutria was an excellent find. I searched high and low after you guys left, but only found more M. religiosa. I wonder if the invaders have anything to do with that?

Not 100% on the Cantharids...just seemed the most likely after staring at the Peterson guide/bugguide for awhile...I tempted fate by handling & prodding them, but no tell-tale fluids or resulting blisters. I had the notion that the non-Pleocoma might be a a bee mimic...I thought it was a dying Bombus until I got close enough to see the antennae.

Looking forward to your additions, sir!
 

Wadew

Arachnobaron
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Aug 14, 2005
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418
What a great variety there your group must have been busy searching all day! Good photography as well.
Cheers Wade
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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Oct 20, 2008
Messages
3,346
Habitaters & misc. gravy

Sceloporus occidentalis


juvenile Racer?


Land salmon:rolleyes:


Pituophis catenifer(expired)


Odocoileus hemionusm male


very large Asian carp trolling for unattended children


Petroglyphs:
this one sure looks like Scutigera



'Scapes



 
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