Cobalt blue enclosure

Dylan Campbell

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Need to know if this is a suitable enclosure for my cobalt blue. It has a water dish it's just kind of hidden.
 

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Venom1080

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Short answer, no.
Long answer
Looks like a swamp in there, Sub should be moist but not soaked.( If not, sorry I can't see too much on my phone)
Heat pads are terrible, especially for fossorial species.
I don't know how big that cage is, but the Sub should be filled to the point where there's a gap no more than 1.5x the TS legspan between the lid and the ground.
I don't know what that hides made of, but it looks like styrofoam, your Haplo will shred it. Just start a burrow somewhere and it will take over.
 

Flexzone

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I'd add a fair amount more sub as C. lividus are a fossorial sp. of T (pet-hole).. They'll need an ample amount of substrate to create a burrow system. I really don't provide hides for my fossorials, I make a pre-made hole at the side of the enclosure and let them do the rest so that I can at least partially view them.
 
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Dylan Campbell

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Dec 15, 2016
Messages
140
Short answer, no.
Long answer
Looks like a swamp in there, Sub should be moist but not soaked.( If not, sorry I can't see too much on my phone)
Heat pads are terrible, especially for fossorial species.
I don't know how big that cage is, but the Sub should be filled to the point where there's a gap no more than 1.5x the TS legspan between the lid and the ground.
I don't know what that hides made of, but it looks like styrofoam, your Haplo will shred it. Just start a burrow somewhere and it will take over.
The hide is made of plastic. I put the heat-pad under the enclosure so the humidity is higher. I had her for about a week and honestly I've only seen her hide out in that little plastic cave I got her. She's really active at night and hidden in the day. I know shes a burrowing species but I haven't seen her dig anything once
 

KezyGLA

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Apr 8, 2016
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Yup. These 2 knocked it on the head. The whole thing needs a switch up.

I am onterested to know what type of enclosure that is. Its nothing I recognise. Have you the name of it?
 

KezyGLA

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She has probably dug to the bottom underneath the hide. She will need more though.
 

Dylan Campbell

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Yup. These 2 knocked it on the head. The whole thing needs a switch up.

I am onterested to know what type of enclosure that is. Its nothing I recognise. Have you the name of it?
I got it off back water reptiles. It's their deluxe cage.
 

Venom1080

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The hide is made of plastic. I put the heat-pad under the enclosure so the humidity is higher. I had her for about a week and honestly I've only seen her hide out in that little plastic cave I got her. She's really active at night and hidden in the day. I know shes a burrowing species but I haven't seen her dig anything once
your spider will cook and die with that heat pad. im surprised she hasnt thrown that hide across the cage by now. the intense heat may be causing her not to burrow. your cage needs a pretty big switch up.
 

Dylan Campbell

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your spider will cook and die with that heat pad. im surprised she hasnt thrown that hide across the cage by now. the intense heat may be causing her not to burrow. your cage needs a pretty big switch up.
Seriously? It's not going to cook and die. It hits 80 degrees. That's it. I'll fill the substrate up a lot higher but you need a way better approach and how to give advice to someone. That's just being a smartass. A lot of other people on here have helped me out but you sound like your trolling me a bit here. I respect everyone's opinion on here. That's why I got here. I'm just telling you the truth here
 

BobBarley

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Seriously? It's not going to cook and die. It hits 80 degrees.
What are you using to measure the temps with? Most heat pads get much, much hotter than that without some sort of dimmer/thermostat. In any case, room temp is fine for almost all t's. The (very general) rule of thumb is, if you're comfortable in a t-shirt or perhaps light long-sleeve, the t is fine. In the winter, all of mine drop down to 67 at night and only warm up to around 72-73 degrees F.

And yes, much more substrate, this guy will burrow A LOT. ;)
 

Dylan Campbell

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What are you using to measure the temps with? Most heat pads get much, much hotter than that without some sort of dimmer/thermostat. In any case, room temp is fine for almost all t's. The (very general) rule of thumb is, if you're comfortable in a t-shirt or perhaps light long-sleeve, the t is fine. In the winter, all of mine drop down to 67 at night and only warm up to around 72-73 degrees F.

And yes, much more substrate, this guy will burrow A LOT. ;)
Thank you sir good to know
 

BobBarley

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Thank you sir good to know
If you really intend on using the heat pad though, putting it on the side, mostly above the substrate level, is safer. T's burrow downward to escape heat, and if the heat mat is on the bottom, it'll only continually get hotter. I'd just scrap the heat pad and save it for a reptile (be sure to get a rheostat/thermostat if you do). Just to clarify, is this specimen a mature male?

Take pics of the setup once you're done with the do-over, and be careful with the specimen. This species is known to be defensive and the bites are definitely not fun. Also, @Venom1080 wasn't trying to come off as rude, it's just that so much of tact is lost while typing on a board like this. There is no tone of voice, there is no body language. Trust me, he's a nice guy lol. ;)
 

Dylan Campbell

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If you really intend on using the heat pad though, putting it on the side, mostly above the substrate level, is safer. T's burrow downward to escape heat, and if the heat mat is on the bottom, it'll only continually get hotter. I'd just scrap the heat pad and save it for a reptile (be sure to get a rheostat/thermostat if you do). Just to clarify, is this specimen a mature male?

Take pics of the setup once you're done with the do-over, and be careful with the specimen. This species is known to be defensive and the bites are definitely not fun. Also, @Venom1080 wasn't trying to come off as rude, it's just that so much of tact is lost while typing on a board like this. There is no tone of voice, there is no body language. Trust me, he's a nice guy lol. ;)
I'm just taking out the hideaway area and the heat pad. My room stays about 73 degrees. It's a female, I checked the under side of her. She was actually really calm when I put her in a temporary box. She was curled up in her hideout and I just scooped her up no problem. I expected her to run. Is this enough substrate?
 

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BobBarley

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I'm just taking out the hideaway area and the heat pad. My room stays about 73 degrees. It's a female, I checked the under side of her. She was actually really calm when I put her in a temporary box. She was curled up in her hideout and I just scooped her up no problem. I expected her to run. Is this enough substrate?
More substrate would be better if possible. This species is sexual dimorphic so mature males should look like this as opposed to the blue on the female. Mature males also have much longer legs in proportion to their bodies. That temp is perfect. Ventral sexing isn't the most accurate way to sex a t. The most accurate way (other than if it's a mature male) is to look for the spermatheca on a molted exuviae. The curling up is probably just due to stress. Got pics of the actual specimen?
 

Dylan Campbell

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More substrate would be better if possible. This species is sexual dimorphic so mature males should look like this as opposed to the blue on the female. Mature males also have much longer legs in proportion to their bodies. That temp is perfect. Ventral sexing isn't the most accurate way to sex a t. The most accurate way (other than if it's a mature male) is to look for the spermatheca on a molted exuviae. The curling up is probably just due to stress. Got pics of the actual specimen?
Her color also makes me think it's a female
 

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Dylan Campbell

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Dec 15, 2016
Messages
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More substrate would be better if possible. This species is sexual dimorphic so mature males should look like this as opposed to the blue on the female. Mature males also have much longer legs in proportion to their bodies. That temp is perfect. Ventral sexing isn't the most accurate way to sex a t. The most accurate way (other than if it's a mature male) is to look for the spermatheca on a molted exuviae. The curling up is probably just due to stress. Got pics of the actual specimen?
That's her compared to the amount of substrate inside
 

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