Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens Open Thread

Colorado Ts

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
567
There has been a run on GBB threads lately. I’d like to hear from all the people here that have Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens slings, juveniles or adults, and who would like to share their experience and knowledge.

This is essentially an open thread for you to post whatever you’d like on this species, the GBB. Ask questions...seek advice. Or simply lurk and read about the experiences of others that enjoy keeping this amazing species.

Concerning the GBB, you can post about starter ideas that I’ve laid-out below...but don’t let those topics limit your participation. Anything concerning the GBB is fair game.


What are/were your 1st impressions?

What do you like/dislike about the species?

How does the GBB compare to other species that you’ve kept?

How many have you kept? Or even how do you keep the various age groups of GBBs?


And as always post images and show us your spiders and how they live in your enclosures. Or even write a post on how you take images of your spiders.

Enjoy. :cool:
 
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McGruder

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 9, 2018
Messages
17
I was very excited to get a GBB a while back. From the first moment I saw a pic of the species, I was dying to have one and after reading up on them quite a bit I finally pulled the trigger. But a few months she arrived (a juvenile I think - her adult coloring hadn't come in yet) she died. :(

The breeder had brought her all the way from the east coast, clear across the country, because he was attending a conference in my town and so offered to drive her over to help save me the cost of shipping. When she arrived he told me that he thought she might be in premolt. She did end up molting a few days later. She was never really very energetic - always kind of sticking to one corner of her enclosure and not spinning much silk. She barely ate anything (a tarantula not eating? I know, it's unheard of!). I think she must have had a bad molt.

It's too bad. They're still my favorite species, aesthetically. I think they're so fascinating and I want another one really badly. But it was tough to lose her.

Sorry to start the thread out with such a downer story! But really I just want to say that anyone who has a GBB alive and healthy is very lucky. :)
Please treasure them! Also, some people IRL just don't understand it when you start talking about a T you loved. So at least I can talk about her here on the forums!
 

Vanisher

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
2,522
I dont keep any now, but i have kept many, from slings to adults. I have been breed them some times, and got 1 eggsack but it was bad sack.

I dunno what to say about them. I dont love them, but i dont dislike them eigher. They are pretty cool, beutiful, and easy to keep speicies!
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
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Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,153
I've had two females, one has since died of old age. Keep dry with a water dish. They are NOT semi-arboreal, they are a terrestrial species and should be kept as such. There are resources online that you can search for that show their environment in Venezuela that clearly show them living on the ground and being opportunistic burrowers - using roots and whatnot to make their homes.
Provide anchor points for webbing. I also supplied a cork bark hide and my girls did use them. Keep a water dish in one corner filled with nothing by fresh water. Once they web the place up, they don't seem to do much housekeeping to the webbing. Unlike other webbing species, like Neoholothele incei, Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens are mostly out and about as adults.
They are fast and skittish, but I have only ever experienced a couple of hair kicking incidents and nothing more defensive than that. This is a species who heads for the safety of their webbing when disturbed, once they have some webbing down, but could potentially bolt outside the enclosure if they have not established themselves in their home.
Both my females reached 5.5" full grown. They are faster growing and have a shorter lifespan than many other South American terrestrial species.
Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens.jpg
DSC06940-2.jpg
 

Colorado Ts

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
567
The Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens was the first species that I acquired when I came back into the hobby.

I ordered slings, something that I had never done before in the hobby. It was not readily known to me as an option when I had my Aphonopelma seemanni.

I watched a lot of YouTube videos, binge watched for a couple weeks and then ordered my slings.

42667E5C-FC20-4EE9-B59D-E48D904627E9.jpeg

This is my usual setup when I’m bringing slings. It all started when I brought in that first group of GBBs: large flat basin is essential for fast moving slings when they are being unpacked. It wasn't really an issue while unpacking the GBBs, but wow was it needed when I unpacked my order of tiny D.diamantinensis...those are 8 legged rockets.

F27A7473-3B1E-4460-A96F-DA27D61F7166.jpeg

My slings arrived packed in tiny vials from Fear Not...exciting and scary at the same time.

6CA909D6-8B8C-43AF-82A3-1A6BEAD728F9.jpeg

Tweezers grasped the packing material so that the tiny sling is not crushed when it is unpacked from the vial. This can be very intimidating that first time...it’s old hat now.

0A54DA56-FE94-4F4D-ACC7-C18BE69FDE4B.jpeg

Unroll the packing and there is my tiny GBB sling. That’s when the thought crossed my mind, “Can I really keep these tiny things alive?”

Transference into the enclosure was easy, each one just daintily walked right in.

54B84840-7981-4662-81C6-FE0BA08C1E65.jpeg

In about 20 minutes I had all 5 slings transferred into their new homes...and my journey back into this hobby began.

I’m really impressed with the GBB. The change in size between moults has been very notable...great beginner species. I need to get more....
 
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Smotzer

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
513
I have one GBB sling that I got at about .75in and I absolutely love it, heavy webbing species just fascinate me and mine has over the last month after the first molt with me has begun webbing everything in its enclosure. It’s eats everything I give it and it’s usually always out on display. Very easy to keep and just a really cool species to own. I hear sometimes on here that they are overrated, but they are perfectly rated for me, I plan on getting a few more to hopefully get one that matures out female. I actually didn’t plan on getting one, I went to an exotic pet store to get a Caribena versicolor and they had a GBB too for 40$ so I impulses bought it and couldn’t be happier. 918FF684-D43F-4B3F-A2E6-57061E11A2EC.jpeg DC76B946-AE42-4E58-8590-9CF961D8A010.jpeg
 

Kaden Bryant

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 26, 2017
Messages
77
@Vanessa
How fast exactly do they grow? How many years does it take for them to reach maturity? And how long do they live?
 

Colorado Ts

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
567
How NOT to keep GBB Slings

This is my personal opinion on keeping GBB slings.

A1F176C9-74DF-4F20-BC8C-8603C0AD973D.jpeg

This was my initial setup for the GBB slings. The above image was taken after the slings had been in their enclosures for 3 days. Whats wrong with this image?

Maybe a nice setup for most slings but not really for my GBBs. The presence of the Spaghnum Moss was the main issue; it helped to hold moisture.

It only took a couple days, and every one of the slings was clinging to the sides of the enclosure right at the vent openings.

The slings were not webbing the way they should; they were not exploring the enclosure; they stayed off the substrate, and they looked stressed; and they were refusing prey items.

9B98B980-2BAB-412A-A285-8AE59EE53F19.jpeg

This image was taken 4 days after I changed the parameters of the enclosure. I removed the moss, dried all 5 of the enclosures out...nice dry substrate with a water dish.

The slings immediately dropped down onto the substrate and began exploring their homes. They established their main area under their hides...and the webbing started with vigor.

Most importantly...they began actively feeding.

Caveat to My GBB Enclosure Setup

Of the 5 slings, 4 improved dramatically; 1 did not. My GBB sling #3 just never came back. The sling was a nervous picky eater; it would eat maybe once a month, while the others ate twice a week and rapidly grew between moults.

After months, I just accepted the fact that not all slings survive and GBB#3 was one of those sad few, destined to that giant web in the sky.

Then this happened: There was a series of threads where people were discussing how to keep their GBB slings. I was promoting the bone dry substrate, while two others were saying not necessarily so, damp is fine. It was a vigorous debate with strong opposing opinions.

So with nothing to loose, I began an experiment: For GBB#3, I dumped the old substrate. Scrubbed out the enclosure with hot soapy water. Got a new hide & deliberately dampened the substrate and left the sling alone undisturbed for a week.

At the end of the week, a fine mist of condensation had formed on the sides of the enclosure. I opened the enclosure, expecting a dead sling, and wiped away the mist.

Then I noticed it...GBB#3 had spun a very nice web on the hide and was no longer showing a stress pose. I offered it food and it greedily grabbed the prey item...it had never ever done that before.

5BEC7036-84E4-46D5-9170-55071414EE4F.jpeg

Today, GBB#3 is alive and well, and eating twice a week, just like the other slings. In the above image you can see droplets of condensation in the webbing and the sling is feeding for the second time that week...awesome. The sling is showing signs of vigor and is finally growing, it is currently less than half the size of all the other 4 slings.

Bottom line...we learn from each other. I tried something that went against my personal experience. I’ve trusted your posts in the past...and so I took a chance and it saved my sling.

So I keep my GBB slings on Bone Dry Substrate, unless they fail to thrive...then I will try this...
 
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Dolichothele

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
Messages
132
[QUOTE="Colorado Ts, post: 3030797, member:but wow was it needed when I unpacked my order of tiny D.diamantinensis...those are 8 legged rockets[/QUOTE]

Now I’m wondering if my D diamantinensis is even what she was sold to me as... when I got her and rehoused her, she just slowly walked in her new enclosure. Then, I noticed that her enclosure needed some changes (more substrate and anchor points for webbing) and when I added more stuff for her she still didn’t bolt...
 

Smotzer

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
513
How NOT to keep GBB Slings

This is my personal opinion on keeping GBB slings.

View attachment 337734

This was my initial setup for the GBB slings. The above image was taken after the slings had been in their enclosures for 3 days. Whats wrong with this image?

Maybe a nice setup for most slings but not really for my GBBs. The presence of the Spaghnum Moss was the main issue; it helped to hold moisture.

It only took a couple days, and every one of the slings was clinging to the sides of the enclosure right at the vent openings.

The slings were not webbing the way they should; they were not exploring the enclosure; they stayed off the substrate, and they looked stressed; and they were refusing prey items.

View attachment 337735

This image was taken 4 days after I changed the parameters of the enclosure. I removed the moss, dried all 5 of the enclosures out...nice dry substrate with a water dish.

The slings immediately dropped down onto the substrate and began exploring their homes. They established their main area under their hides...and the webbing started with vigor.

Most importantly...they began actively feeding.

Caveat to My Enclosure

Of the 5 slings, 4 improved dramatically; 1 did not. My GBB sling #3 just never came back. The sling was a nervous picky eater; it would eat maybe once a month, while the others ate twice a week and rapidly grew between moults.

After months, I just accepted the fact that not all slings survive and GBB#3 was one of those sad few, destined to that giant web in the sky.

Then this happened: There was a series of threads where people were discussing how to keep their GBB slings. I was promoting the bone dry substrate, while two others were saying not necessarily so, damp is fine. It was a vigorous debate with strong opposing opinions.

So with nothing to loose, I began an experiment: For GBB#3, I dumped the old substrate. Scrubbed out the enclosure with hot soapy water. Got a new hide & deliberately dampened the substrate and left the sling alone undisturbed for a week.

At the end of the week, a fine mist of condensation had formed on the sides of the enclosure. I opened the enclosure, expecting a dead sling, and wiped away the mist.

Then I noticed it...GBB#3 had spun a very nice web on the hide and was no longer showing a stress pose. I offered it food and it greedily grabbed the prey item...it had never ever done that before.

View attachment 337742

Today, GBB#3 is alive and well, and eating twice a week, just like the other slings. In the above image you can see droplets of condensation in the webbing and the sling is feeding for the second time that week...awesome. The sling is showing signs of vigor and is finally growing, it is currently less than half the size of all the other 4 slings.

Bottom line...we learn from each other. I tried something that went against my personal experience. I’ve trusted your posts in the past...and so I took a chance and it saved my sling.

So I keep my GBB slings on Bone Dry Substrate, unless they fail to thrive...then I will try this...
I had the same encounter as you, I originally had the sling on damp substrate and it did not eat nor web at all, and clung to the sides near the vent holes, I changed it to dry and it was a whole new tarantula.

What is interesting is that one of yours actually prefers the damp substrate!cool how individuals can like different environments
 

Colorado Ts

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
567
Now I’m wondering if my D diamantinensis is even what she was sold to me as... when I got her and rehoused her, she just slowly walked in her new enclosure. Then, I noticed that her enclosure needed some changes (more substrate and anchor points for webbing) and when I added more stuff for her she still didn’t bolt...
I’m getting to the point where I need to mentally prepare myself BEFORE I open their soufflé cups and feed them. :bag:

9CDF8A6D-F14E-41F8-8DAB-59D62B546C6E.jpeg

This little turd right here is one of the worst. #6 Cannot wait to launch into a Low Earth Orbit. Little stinker.

I had the same encounter as you, I originally had the sling on damp substrate and it did not eat nor web at all, and clung to the sides near the vent holes, I changed it to dry and it was a whole new tarantula.

What is interesting is that one of yours actually prefers the damp substrate!cool how individuals can like different environments
That was a shocker....I was expecting a dead sling, that was my hypothesis when I initiated the experiment. But those two people were adamant that it was ok. We disagreed but I needed to do something, I hadn't even disclosed that I was having trouble with GBB#3. It wasn't part of the conversation, but I didn't close myself off to their ideas and experience (a lot of people here do just that). I just had to trust and accept their higher level of experience. Humbling. :bag:

As I recall, I think YOU were even posting in one of those threads. :cool:
 
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vancwa

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2011
Messages
234
My first one hooked-out...bummer. I now have a beautiful female. She doesn't drink from the water dish. I have to put water on the webbing.
 

Smotzer

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
513
That was a shocker....I was expecting a dead sling, that was my hypothesis when I initiated the experiment. But those two people were adamant that it was ok. We disagreed but I needed to do something, I hadn't even disclosed that I was having trouble with GBB#3. It wasn't part of the conversation, but I didn't close myself off to their ideas and experience (a lot of people here do just that). I just had to trust and accept their higher level of experience. Humbling. :bag:

As I recall, I think YOU were even posting in one of those threads. :cool:
That was a shocker....I was expecting a dead sling, that was my hypothesis when I initiated the experiment. But those two people were adamant that it was ok. We disagreed but I needed to do something, I hadn't even disclosed that I was having trouble with GBB#3. It wasn't part of the conversation, but I didn't close myself off to their ideas and experience (a lot of people here do just that). I just had to trust and accept their higher level of experience. Humbling. :bag:

As I recall, I think YOU were even posting in one of those threads. :cool:
You are right! I was indeed posting in those threads!
 

Dolichothele

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2020
Messages
132
I’m getting to the point where I need to mentally prepare myself BEFORE I open their soufflé cups and feed them. :bag:

View attachment 337743

This little turd right here is one of the worst. #6 Cannot wait to launch into a Low Earth Orbit. Little stinker.
I’m getting to the point where I need to mentally prepare myself BEFORE I open their soufflé cups and feed them. :bag:

View attachment 337743

This little turd right here is one of the worst. #6 Cannot wait to launch into a Low Earth Orbit. Little stinker.
My dolichothele diamantinensis is currently my first and only tarantula, so I’m glad she never bolted, but now I remember why she didn’t bolt... when I got her, she was in a vial with no ventilation so she was probably really weak and stressed when I rehoused her. Fortunately, a week after I got her she started burrowing and making webbing. Now she bolts into her burrow when I open her enclosure. The only problem is that she hides her molts and eaten crickets in her burrow...
 

KaroKoenig

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
Messages
58
The beautiful looks of this species is what sold my wife to the idea of getting tarantulas into the house. We have one subadult Chromatopelma (wife and I) called "Schnappi" and a 2-year-old Brachypelma hamorii (belonging to my son) called "Puschel".
 

Chroma Trigger

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2020
Messages
96
Yeah, IMO just a boring species overall. Doesn't web, tricky eater and grows slower than any Brachy :troll:

Admittedly, they miiiiiiight be a tad overrated. But besides them being rather skittish and their tendency to flick hairs, the positives outweigh the negatives by a LOT... at least for me. Liking a T is always subjective. To me, they are just beautiful tarantulas that will turn the right enclosure into a fascinating web castle! Watching a GBB web is always a treat!

A GBB sling was my second tarantula ever, after a Brachypelma Smithi sling (that burrowed and went missing for 6 months). The growth rate is astonishing and they look beautiful at every stage in between molts. Every nice coloration that disappears is replaced by something equally stunning. I remember being amazed at how the legs turned completely blue after one molt. I posted this a few times during the last days, but my latest GBB experience was her leaving her webbing, because I dribbled too much water on it. Just left it and started a new web somewhere else. I always use a dripper (pipette) for her and my Avics, so they can drink off their webbing. Might tone that down in the future, but my Avics love a little rainfall! They remind me of that vacuum cleaner from the Teletubbies, sucking in any droplets :lol:
 

Vanessa

Grammostola Groupie
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Mar 12, 2016
Messages
2,153
@Vanessa
How fast exactly do they grow? How many years does it take for them to reach maturity? And how long do they live?
Males < 2 years, females between 3-4 years, lifespan of a female is around 12 years. I would put them at the same rates as an Avicularia avicularia.
 
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