Chilobrachys fimbriatus or Pterinochilus murinus

Depro900

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 27, 2014
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15
Hello I am deciding on a new pickup between one of these beautiful OW T's and am wondering if anyone has any suggestions as I am new to this board. I love the coloration on both and am looking for an OW T that is a very heavy webber and also quite hardy. Im leaning towards the P.murinus for its hardiness and dry enviornment but I know its probably the 'crazier' out of the two. Any help would be appreciated, cheers!
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
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Jun 12, 2016
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555
Tough choice. Like the Venom1080 said, they're pretty cheap and I'd get both if I could also. I thought of OBT's as insane or crazy before I had one. You give it what it needs to feel secure and leave it alone, you'll find that it's pretty easy to care for.
I don't have a C fimbriatus, but they look like a piece of art.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
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Apr 8, 2016
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Yeah its totally a tough choice but if I was to suggest any it would have to be P. murinus. Because murinus.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Actually for the "web" part I see no particular differences... offer to a P.murinus nothing to hide, not enough substrate inches and he/she will cover the whole thing with web, creating his/her "web-home".

A practice that I highly dislike, those ('OBT') needs inches of substrate and a piece of old good cork bark: while adaptable and hardy, IMO their first love choice is to burrow.

As for deciding about which buy, I love both as well even if today I don't have anymore Asians (save for Scolopendridae). Talking about 0.1 only, here where I live C.fimbriatus are a bit more priced than P.murinus, hands down one of the most cheaper T's ever.

Both easy to care, even if the Asians require slightly moist/moist (depends) substrate and class ventilation.

Temperament is that lovely OW's baddy, during a rehouse waay back then my C.fimbriatus delivered (in the air) more than three bites in not even 5 seconds: multiple bites if they want.
 

klawfran3

Arachnobaron
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Feb 6, 2013
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559
I've kept both before and I feel that C. fimbriatus would be a better choice if you haven't had either. When upset I've noticed fimbriatus tends to shoot down the burrow, while murinus is more confrontational and throws up a threat display. This can be a challenge since a fast aggressive spider is much less fun to deal with angry than a fast shy spider. I also have a bias towards asian burrowers since I used to have a large amount of them. They have a good bit of character and are very easy to care for. They're a good starting point too for getting into Asian and African terrestrial since they're less opinionated and confrontational in my experience.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
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Apr 8, 2016
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3,026
Murinus is the way. So many variants, all beautiful.. I have caught the bug and cant stop. Although I may be slightly biased towards African species, here an L2 OCF murinus is £4

Fimbriatus a little more pricey. They both look great.

It all comes down to opinion.

Whatever you think looks nicer then go for it man.


.. A beautiful bright orange/gold ball of the unexpected might be right up your street :D
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
Im going to continue on beating this dead horse.

OBT's are not crazy if you provide plenty of space, substrate, and hiding spots. They would rather hide than attack.

Also a properly kept OBT means you have a pet web.
 

Depro900

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 27, 2014
Messages
15
Actually for the "web" part I see no particular differences... offer to a P.murinus nothing to hide, not enough substrate inches and he/she will cover the whole thing with web, creating his/her "web-home".

A practice that I highly dislike, those ('OBT') needs inches of substrate and a piece of old good cork bark: while adaptable and hardy, IMO their first love choice is to burrow.

As for deciding about which buy, I love both as well even if today I don't have anymore Asians (save for Scolopendridae). Talking about 0.1 only, here where I live C.fimbriatus are a bit more priced than P.murinus, hands down one of the most cheaper T's ever.

Both easy to care, even if the Asians require slightly moist/moist (depends) substrate and class ventilation.

Temperament is that lovely OW's baddy, during a rehouse waay back then my C.fimbriatus delivered (in the air) more than three bites in not even 5 seconds: multiple bites if they want.
I am leaning towards the C.fimbriatus I think people!:) Any tips on keeping the substrate damp with all that webbing covering it? :/ I could see how keeping damp conditions or a water dish could be a little difficult lol. Also what do you mean by class ventilation? I'm assuming they need more ventilation than a P.murinus because they're less hardy?
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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I am leaning towards the C.fimbriatus I think people!:) Any tips on keeping the substrate damp with all that webbing covering it? :/ I could see how keeping damp conditions or a water dish could be a little difficult lol. Also what do you mean by class ventilation? I'm assuming they need more ventilation than a P.murinus because they're less hardy?

Unlike most tarantulas, you can actually choose how to care for this spider. If you give webbing anchor points (as I've done above), you'll end up with a display spider that makes elaborate web tunnels. If you provide nothing but substrate, it will burrow very deep and you'll have a pet hole. Your choice.

Either way, you'll want to keep this species fairly damp. I never let the substrate dry out completely. Slings will die within a day or two on dry substrate, although juvies and adults can handle the occasional drought. As for keeping it damp with all the webbing, I haven't found that to be an issue. Just have a crater where your water dish is - that is, almost a bowl that is below the level of the rest of the substrate. Heavily overfill the water dish and the rest of the substrate will damped via the wicking effect. Due to the high humidity, ensure that you've got plenty of ventilation. A stuffy enclosure will kill most animals, this spider is no different. Luckily, since there is so much webbing, mold shouldn't really be an issue for you.

Heads up. If a spider could be called aggressive, this is it. Adult females will actively chase intruders. They will not stand their ground, they will run towards you. They are very hesitant to leave their enclosure though, so that's good. They grow fairly quickly; expect adult males within 18 months and adult females within 2 years. That being said, don't be afraid to feed relatively heavily.

Without exaggeration, this is my favorite species that I've kept. Amazing coloration, great webbing, always out (if not given a burrowing setup), and a nasty attitude.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Dec 25, 2014
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5,826
I am leaning towards the C.fimbriatus I think people!:) Any tips on keeping the substrate damp with all that webbing covering it? :/ I could see how keeping damp conditions or a water dish could be a little difficult lol.
Basing this with the experience I had with that genus, provide them lots of inches of substrate and a piece of cork bark with a couple of fake leaves nearby: 90 out of 100 the C.fimbriatus will burrow. You can house those like EulersK do as well, just IMO you would have more web.

You need a water dish, always full, and moist substrate (moist, not wet). Pour room temperature directly in the substrate and you're done.

When it comes to Asians or other tropical inverts I love to add a bit of vermiculite (fine grain, not the 'heavy' rough one) in the substrate, mixed. That help to mantain on the long run humidity.

Also what do you mean by class ventilation? I'm assuming they need more ventilation than a P.murinus because they're less hardy?
I'm a fan of ventilation for those that require a more humid parameter. I don't use 'cleaning squads'. I don't partially cover the vent-holes. I just remove asap prey remains and offer set up where air circulation is provided.
 

Depro900

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 27, 2014
Messages
15

Unlike most tarantulas, you can actually choose how to care for this spider. If you give webbing anchor points (as I've done above), you'll end up with a display spider that makes elaborate web tunnels. If you provide nothing but substrate, it will burrow very deep and you'll have a pet hole. Your choice.

Either way, you'll want to keep this species fairly damp. I never let the substrate dry out completely. Slings will die within a day or two on dry substrate, although juvies and adults can handle the occasional drought. As for keeping it damp with all the webbing, I haven't found that to be an issue. Just have a crater where your water dish is - that is, almost a bowl that is below the level of the rest of the substrate. Heavily overfill the water dish and the rest of the substrate will damped via the wicking effect. Due to the high humidity, ensure that you've got plenty of ventilation. A stuffy enclosure will kill most animals, this spider is no different. Luckily, since there is so much webbing, mold shouldn't really be an issue for you.

Heads up. If a spider could be called aggressive, this is it. Adult females will actively chase intruders. They will not stand their ground, they will run towards you. They are very hesitant to leave their enclosure though, so that's good. They grow fairly quickly; expect adult males within 18 months and adult females within 2 years. That being said, don't be afraid to feed relatively heavily.

Without exaggeration, this is my favorite species that I've kept. Amazing coloration, great webbing, always out (if not given a burrowing setup), and a nasty attitude.
Thanks so much I am very excited about this species! Everything about them just seems too good to be true its like everything in one package in a T. But I'm curious aren't P.murinus also T's that you can choose how to care for them? I thought also with them if you don't give as much substrate they will web a lot more and be out more often but if you do provide deep substrate they will burrow deep. Almost seems very similar except P.murinus is in a dry habitat and very orange. ;)
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Thanks so much I am very excited about this species! Everything about them just seems too good to be true its like everything in one package in a T. But I'm curious aren't P.murinus also T's that you can choose how to care for them? I thought also with them if you don't give as much substrate they will web a lot more and be out more often but if you do provide deep substrate they will burrow deep. Almost seems very similar except P.murinus is in a dry habitat and very orange. ;)
From what I've raised, P. murinus will always burrow if given the substrate to do so. They'll web as well, sure, but they'll have their burrow to retreat to. On the other hand, C. fimbriatus will simply not burrow at all if you give them webbing anchor points. They just seem content with webbing.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Im going to continue on beating this dead horse.

OBT's are not crazy if you provide plenty of space, substrate, and hiding spots. They would rather hide than attack.

Also a properly kept OBT means you have a pet web.
Agreed - I think that they have such a bad rep because of newbies getting them. If they're cared for properly, they're really not that much of a handful. Don't get me wrong, they're mean and they will bite and it will hurt. But they're not the demons that people make them out to be. I've raised around five from sling to adulthood, and I currently have one of those as an adult female. I never, ever see her. Just her feet when she's hungry. When faced with the choice of fight or flight, they will always choose flight... unless cornered. But just like most animals, if you corner it, be prepared for it to fight back.
 

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
Agreed - I think that they have such a bad rep because of newbies getting them. If they're cared for properly, they're really not that much of a handful. Don't get me wrong, they're mean and they will bite and it will hurt. But they're not the demons that people make them out to be. I've raised around five from sling to adulthood, and I currently have one of those as an adult female. I never, ever see her. Just her feet when she's hungry. When faced with the choice of fight or flight, they will always choose flight... unless cornered. But just like most animals, if you corner it, be prepared for it to fight back.
I agree and this is my experience as well.

You plan on breeding your girl?
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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I agree and this is my experience as well.

You plan on breeding your girl?
Certainly not. I've even had a MM since she's been mature. Unfortunately, they've become disposable pets. On top of that, new hobbyists are the first to buy them because of the price. I'm just not interested in dozens of leftover OBT's that didn't sell and are quickly growing into a legion of nasty holes.
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
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Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,618
You plan on breeding your girl?
Im pretty sure he recently bred her, I gotta admit I would take C.fimbriatus over P.murinus any day ;) not saying OBTs aren't cool, but man C.fimbriatus has gotta be the pick between those two, if you could only pick one.
 
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