Chilean rose death?

Creepycrawlymom

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
9
Hello, I'm brand new to all of this. I've had my rosey for about 4 years now. I'm certain she's a female. I got her 2 weeks after her first molt. A couple weeks after that she started eating and we lived happily together for the next 3 years in which she hadn't molted until 2 months ago, which I thought was very odd. Well now since her molt she has not eaten and now has burrowed in a corner of her cage and hasn't moved, a white web looking spot is just piling up behind her. Her legs are curled undernether her body and shows NO sign of movement. Her abdomen has becoming increasingly flat over the last couple days. I will say I do not have a heater and I keep a water dish full and sometimes just over flow it for excess moisture. She has been a normal active spider until her last molt. Is she dying or what is going on?? I'm afraid to take a picture in fear of her becoming anymore stressed if she is when I remove the lide ro her cage. please help.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
Welcome to the boards,

Could you please post photos of spider and enclosure please?
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
667
If you have an artist paint brush, verrry gently stroke a front leg with the bristles. If you see no response, then I'm afraid its too late and its past on.
A photo would help, but from your description I fear the worst.
 

Misty Day

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 9, 2013
Messages
431
You don't need to provide more moisture for a G.rosea. They come from the one of the driest regions on Earth.

As others have said a picture would definitely help.
 

Marijan2

Arachnobaron
Joined
Oct 21, 2012
Messages
505
I check her everyday. today her abdomen has decreased a lot since yesterday. I am fearful for the worst. Her substrate is always very dry.
I'm sad to inform you, but i don't think she is alive from what i see on the picture. At best she have few hours left
 

Tfisher

Arachno-Geek
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 28, 2014
Messages
253
This photo makes me think there could been a blockage? This is strange to see that much webbing come from Porteri.. Only other thing is that it could be thats its not webbing at all... Its poss thats a burst in the abdomen maybe caused by its last molt.

Sorry to say but she looks to be dead.
 

Creepycrawlymom

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
9
This photo makes me think there could been a blockage? This is strange to see that much webbing come from Porteri.. Only other thing is that it could be thats its not webbing at all... Its poss thats a burst in the abdomen maybe caused by its last molt.

Sorry to say but she looks to be dead.
That is what I feared since her last molt she wasn't the same. Never ate and I never seen her drink. I feel so terrible. Thank you so much for the information.
 

Tfisher

Arachno-Geek
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 28, 2014
Messages
253
I hope you decide to get some other T's, don't let this discourage you. Feel free to post your next addition on the boards :)
 

Creepycrawlymom

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
9
I hope you decide to get some other T's, don't let this discourage you. Feel free to post your next addition on the boards :)
Ever since I got her I wanted more! My eyes have been set on a goliath bird eater. I love all the beautiful arachnids. Thank you for being so understanding.
 

Tfisher

Arachno-Geek
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Sep 28, 2014
Messages
253
Check out the classifieds section and I'm sure you'll be able to find something that will help fill the hole in your heart. Idk if i'd recommend T. Strimi off the bat tho. They are kept basically the opposite of the T you just had. Also are equip with ferocious hairs that can "burn" your skin. (Thats what I've read)

There are plenty of other Genus' that I would recommend tho.
Just always make sure you do your research and ask questions if your unsure.

Anything - Brachypelma, Avicularia, Grammastola or Eulthus genus.
 

Creepycrawlymom

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
9
Check out the classifieds section and I'm sure you'll be able to find something that will help fill the hole in your heart. Idk if i'd recommend T. Strimi off the bat tho. They are kept basically the opposite of the T you just had. Also are equip with ferocious hairs that can "burn" your skin. (Thats what I've read)

There are plenty of other Genus' that I would recommend tho.
Just always make sure you do your research.

Anything - Brachypelma, Avicularia, Grammastola or Eulthus genus.
Thank you for the recommendations. I'll definitely check out the classifieds.
 

Bugmom

Arachnolord
Joined
May 28, 2012
Messages
650
Sorry for your loss. It does look like something went wrong with her molt.
Ever since I got her I wanted more! My eyes have been set on a goliath bird eater. I love all the beautiful arachnids. Thank you for being so understanding.
Goliath bird eaters have very specific and intensive care requirements. Expect to spend about as much time keeping one of those alive as you would expensive, delicate fish.

If you want a large spider, the Salmon Pink Birdeater (L. parahybana) is a great choice. They get very large but don't have the same care requirements as a T. stirmi (goliath bird eater).
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
So sorry you had to go through this after keeping her for so long. :(
It sounds like something went wrong during the molting process.

A Theraphosa stirmi/blondi (common name goliath birdeater, people here prefer scientific names), is quite a step up from a G.rosea, and not one I would take. There are a lot more beginner friendly tarantula out there. Just google this search: beginner tarantula arachnoboards, and it will come up with a lot of info on beginner species and care.
For now, best of luck, and sorry for your loss.
 

Venom1080

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,584
Thank you. i feared that she was i think total she is 6 years old. I hope I gave her happy life.
sorry for your loss. :(
if she was 6 years, then she died prematurely, they can live up to around 20 years. nothing looks wrong but it could of been something internally. check out Brachypelma if you are thinking of getting another, Particularly B emilia and B smithi.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
Sad to see a T pass.. My condolences.

However, I am a little confused.. You say there was 3 years between moults? Did you buy her as an adult? My girl was 3.5 years between moults, was over 5.5" and is over 10 years old. I have rarely heard of moult cycles being much longer than that to be honest.


It's just how it goes I suppose..
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,861
I'm certain she's a female. I got her 2 weeks after her first molt.
No you didn't




No, she wasn't 6 either, she was much older than that, as an adult female molting every 3 years I would estimate (because unless you raise it from hatchling, you won't ever know) she was at least 12, probably older.

Ever since I got her I wanted more! My eyes have been set on a goliath bird eater. I love all the beautiful arachnids. Thank you for being so understanding.
As others have said, this would be an awful choice. These are an advanced species, and its due to their care requirements.

sorry for your loss. :(
if she was 6 years, then she died prematurely, they can live up to around 20 years.
Ha, double that. And I've heard 40 may be a conservative estimate. Mine was a full grown adult, molting every 4-5 years back when I got her 16 years ago. I'd bet she's gotta be 30.



It could have easily been something that went wrong with its last molt, as was speculated on already. But it could be simpler. We've seen numerous accounts of rosies not drinking after molting and dehydrating as a result of the dry environment provided. In truth, there are probably dozens of plausible theories we could put forth, but in the end, they're all gonna just be theories and you probably won't ever know for sure.

Jump back in the game though and get another, or maybe 2 or 3. I think you will find other species to be much more active and interesting as this is literally the most boring species you could own (and I still love them). I'd suggest getting a G. pulchripes, B. albopilosum, B. smithi/emelia, or if a larger specimen is more to your liking, an LP, A. geniculata, and/or N. chromatus. Cool smaller specimens would be the many Euthalus species.

This in a young G. pulchripes, which would be my suggestion.
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