Ceratogyrus marshalli isn't digging

Neoza

Arachnobaron
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I Bought 2 weeks ago a semi-adult ceratogyrus marshalli. Normally this species should be digging in the ground. I provided 10 cm substrate for digging. She just sits behind a plant, in a corner. She didn't moved a single grain of dirt. I bought her on an expo and she was really stressed out, her cage was waaay to small and it was very dirty. Normally this species is kind of agressive, but when i rehoused her she was as calm as a brachypelma smithi, i think the seller didn't treat her well! Could this be the reason why she doesnt dig? I know the only thing that i can do is wait, but i want to know if there are people here who had a similar experience?
 

Chris LXXIX

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Just wait. If the Theraphosidae, at first sight, looks healthy, there's nothing to worry. Stress is an issue and they have their times. First, the substrate is bone dry? Because they like dry (with a water dish of course).

I have a female, adult Megaphobema robustum which, after an hell of re-house (due to her previous owner bad and poor care, horrible choice of little, poor ventilation glass enclosure etc) took more than a month for start her new burrow.
Now she's happy, of course.

Ceratogyrus marshalli and Ceratogyrus sp. are very easy, ridiculous Theraphosidae to care. Also i assume that, if the temperature is "normal" (meaning not Siberian cold, nor hot like two hell) and the substrate is dry etc no need to worry. Btw, do you offered a piece of cork bark, do you started a little hole near?
Sometimes a little help works.

There's people who put nothing but substrate in obligate burrowers/burrowing T's enclosure, but a piece of cork bark IMO always is needed and appreciated.

P.S
I have one, of course, a female Ceratogyrus marshalli. She loves to make new space and work in her burrow only prior to a new molt. Lovely genus they are.
 
Last edited:

viper69

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Ceratogyrus marshalli isn,t digging

There's people who put nothing but substrate in obligate burrowers/burrowing T's enclosure, but a piece of cork bark IMO always is needed and appreciated.
There's nothing wrong with adding cork bark, however in point of fact, a piece of cork bark is not always needed.

My marshalli dug a nice burrow without cork at all. The same for some of my other burrowing Ts. Ts are highly "skilled engineers"
 

Neoza

Arachnobaron
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Jul 4, 2014
Messages
302
Just wait. If the Theraphosidae, at first sight, looks healthy, there's nothing to worry. Stress is an issue and they have their times. First, the substrate is bone dry? Because they like dry (with a water dish of course).

I have a female, adult Megaphobema robustum which, after an hell of re-house (due to her previous owner bad and poor care, horrible choice of little, poor ventilation glass enclosure etc) took more than a month for start her new burrow.
Now she's happy, of course.

Ceratogyrus marshalli and Ceratogyrus sp. are very easy, ridiculous Theraphosidae to care. Also i assume that, if the temperature is "normal" (meaning not Siberian cold, nor hot like two hell) and the substrate is dry etc no need to worry. Btw, do you offered a piece of cork bark, do you started a little hole near?
Sometimes a little help works.

There's people who put nothing but substrate in obligate burrowers/burrowing T's enclosure, but a piece of cork bark IMO always is needed and appreciated.

P.S
I have one, of course, a female Ceratogyrus marshalli. She loves to make new space and work in her burrow only prior to a new molt. Lovely genus they are.
Yes, the substrate is veeery dry, and its always 22-23 degrees. And yes i putted some things in there, like a plastic plant and corkbark. And i also started a little hole in one of the corners. Thank you for advice, i will just wait! I offered her once a large worm, but she didnt want it, but she's a little bit to fat so thats no problem. I think the seller powerfeeded her, because when i bought her she was freshly molted and her abdomen is still really fat, so i dont want to imagine how she was before her molt!

---------- Post added 10-04-2015 at 08:50 PM ----------

There's nothing wrong with adding cork bark, however in point of fact, a piece of cork bark is not always needed.

My marshalli dug a nice burrow without cork at all. The same for some of my other burrowing Ts. Ts are highly "skilled engineers"
Yeah thats true, in fact they dont need plants or hides, they make it by themself, but its rather for decoration that i put it in there. But for her it looks to be good, because she is using the plastic plant for hiding her. Thank you for reply!
 

Chris LXXIX

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There's nothing wrong with adding cork bark, however in point of fact, a piece of cork bark is not always needed.

My marshalli dug a nice burrow without cork at all. The same for some of my other burrowing Ts. Ts are highly "skilled engineers"
Yes, that's true. Just me, i can't stand to view a Theraphosidae enclosure without a water dish, and a piece of cork bark. Even if not always needed, all of the T's i had/have in almost 25 years dealing with those loved/love that.
My Pelinobius muticus, the Ephebopus sp. "Haplos", Chilobrachys sp. i had etc started 9 out of 10 their burrows just under the cork. It give them.. don't know, some sort of security. And help.

---------- Post added 10-04-2015 at 03:07 PM ----------

Yes, the substrate is veeery dry, and its always 22-23 degrees. And yes i putted some things in there, like a plastic plant and corkbark. And i also started a little hole in one of the corners. Thank you for advice, i will just wait! I offered her once a large worm, but she didnt want it, but she's a little bit to fat so thats no problem. I think the seller powerfeeded her, because when i bought her she was freshly molted and her abdomen is still really fat, so i dont want to imagine how she was before her molt!

---------- Post added 10-04-2015 at 08:50 PM ----------


Yeah thats true, in fact they dont need plants or hides, they make it by themself, but its rather for decoration that i put it in there. But for her it looks to be good, because she is using the plastic plant for hiding her. Thank you for reply!
Don't worry, just a normal stress. Don't offer him/her preys.. just wait. Sooner or later will start a burrow :)
 

Neoza

Arachnobaron
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Messages
302
Yes, that's true. Just me, i can't stand to view a Theraphosidae enclosure without a water dish, and a piece of cork bark. Even if not always needed, all of the T's i had/have in almost 25 years dealing with those loved/love that.
My Pelinobius muticus, the Ephebopus sp. "Haplos", Chilobrachys sp. i had etc started 9 out of 10 their burrows just under the cork. It give them.. don't know, some sort of security. And help.

---------- Post added 10-04-2015 at 03:07 PM ----------



Don't worry, just a normal stress. Don't offer him/her preys.. just wait. Sooner or later will start a burrow :)
Ok thanx :)
 

Poec54

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I give my spiders a cork slab (leaned against the side of the cage) for them to hide under, whether terrestrial or arboreal. They live under there, and most will dig and tunnel under there too.
 

Formerphobe

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Many subadult to adult obligate burrowers, regardless of species, seem to take a long time to acclimate to new habitats. There was a documentary done a number of years ago on a project that was rehoming multiple, well established adult female A enzendami from a proposed construction site to a refuge area. The biologists provided prestarted burrows and monitored each female's progress. A few took right to their new accommodations, most took weeks to months to acclimate, a few never did.
I have found this to be true of captive bred specimens, too. Instinct tells the females to dig deep as slings and never leave.
Just give her more time. Put her in a permanent set up now so she doesn't have to be uprooted again.
 

Thistles

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That's great info, Formerphobe. I had a Psednocnemis brachyramosa female refuse to burrow after a rehouse despite a starter burrow. She eventually died. I have a new Ephebopus cyanognathus that is also refusing to burrow. I just expect her to dig when she's settled, but it's interesting to have something like an explanation regarding my unfortunate Psednocnemis brachyramosa.
 

MikeC

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OP, I wish I could give you advice on your issue, but all I could suggest is time. Just give it time.

That's great info, Formerphobe. I had a Psednocnemis brachyramosa female refuse to burrow after a rehouse despite a starter burrow. She eventually died. I have a new Ephebopus cyanognathus that is also refusing to burrow. I just expect her to dig when she's settled, but it's interesting to have something like an explanation regarding my unfortunate Psednocnemis brachyramosa.
I don't know much about the Brachyramosa, but I've had several Ephebopus with that same tendency.
They can be a little picky about substrate, mine had preferred theirs evenly moistened. If there's a dry layer on top, they were hesitant to burrow. I notice this with some of my Haplopelmas as well. A piece of cork does wonders for security, though.
Granted, I'm not sure if this even applies to you, but I figured I'd mention it.
 

Poec54

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That's great info, Formerphobe. I had a Psednocnemis brachyramosa female refuse to burrow after a rehouse despite a starter burrow. She eventually died. I have a new Ephebopus cyanognathus that is also refusing to burrow. I just expect her to dig when she's settled, but it's interesting to have something like an explanation regarding my unfortunate Psednocnemis brachyramosa.

My brachyramosa have dug burrows under cork slabs, as has my E cyanognathus & murinus. Without them, I would get much digging.
 

Thistles

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Almost all of my enclosures include some sort of burrow support, usually cork. Actually, I think only one doesn't and it houses a gravid Haplo. The Ephebopus cyanognathus is huddled under one but hasn't started to dig yet. I've had it less than a month, so I'm not too worried about it and it's from the collection that has this weird stuff going on, so I'm kind of glad it's staying where I can keep tabs on it.

The Psednocnemis brachyramosa was in an enclosure with deep, damp substrate and a starter burrow. I don't recall if I incorporated cork into the tank or not, but I usually do. This was a few years ago. I got 3 slings at the same time and all of them settled in without issue and have since matured and been sold. It was just the adult female that refused to burrow (or eat) and passed a few months later. The Ephebopus is eating well.

I just thought Formerphobe's info was very interesting and shed a little light on what might have been going on with my stubborn non-diggers.
 

Neoza

Arachnobaron
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Messages
302
Many subadult to adult obligate burrowers, regardless of species, seem to take a long time to acclimate to new habitats. There was a documentary done a number of years ago on a project that was rehoming multiple, well established adult female A enzendami from a proposed construction site to a refuge area. The biologists provided prestarted burrows and monitored each female's progress. A few took right to their new accommodations, most took weeks to months to acclimate, a few never did.
I have found this to be true of captive bred specimens, too. Instinct tells the females to dig deep as slings and never leave.
Just give her more time. Put her in a permanent set up now so she doesn't have to be uprooted again.
Interesting! thx!

---------- Post added 10-06-2015 at 07:47 PM ----------

Ok, i will just wait it out! thx for reply! :D
 
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