Centrobolus sp. ‘Mozambique’

snakefactor

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2020
Messages
8
Hey guys, does anyone have any experience keeping Centrobolus sp. ‘mozambique’
Had mine for about a week now and they seem to be doing well, just want to make sure I’m giving them the best care possible!
I keep them at 21-24°c with about 75% humidity and plenty of substrate & leaf litter to burrow in (and some cork bark to climb on)
 

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Arthroverts

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Messages
1,714
Since they are tropical I'd recommend trying to keep that temperature up a bit more, 22-23C minimum. Humidity isn't as important as soil moisture; so long as there isn't too much ventilation and the soil is moist it should be fine.
What's the rest of your setup look like? Substrate recipe, enclosure, foods offered, etc. They apparently appreciate white rotting wood in volume.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

snakefactor

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2020
Messages
8
The seller said they’re very picky and will often refuse fruits and vegetables with the exception of banana, so I’ve been giving them plenty of rotting wood with small banana slices.
I use peat soil mixed with sphagnum moss and coco fibre as a substrate as they can burrow quite easily in it. As for the enclosure I’m using the Komodo millipede set up which was recommended to me.
 

MantidMaster

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
83
The seller said they’re very picky and will often refuse fruits and vegetables with the exception of banana, so I’ve been giving them plenty of rotting wood with small banana slices.
I use peat soil mixed with sphagnum moss and coco fibre as a substrate as they can burrow quite easily in it. As for the enclosure I’m using the Komodo millipede set up which was recommended to me.
I'd recommend throwing some rotten leaves on there too. However, the substrate you mentioned is 100% filler, which is no bueno for substrate-eating creatures like millipedes. Personally, I'd ditch the peat, keep the sphagnum and coco fiber, but make sure only 25% of the substrate is coco fiber. The rest should be ground-up decayed leaves, and that rotten wood you got, as well as some flake soil(decayed Traeger Oak pellets) and maybe a tiny bit of calcium, like limestone or cuttlebone. I'd recommend buying some flake soil for now, but consider looking into making your own, as the process is pretty simple once you have a tested and true method. If you're looking into keeping rhinoceros or stag beetles, learning how to make flake soil would be beneficial for those hobby fields as well.

Keep feeding bananas if that's what they like, but I recommend changing up your substrate.

As Arthroverts said, keep the temperature up as well. Too much ventilation for tropical millipedes can lead to desiccation, so watch out. Be sure to keep us updated :)
 

snakefactor

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 22, 2020
Messages
8
I'd recommend throwing some rotten leaves on there too. However, the substrate you mentioned is 100% filler, which is no bueno for substrate-eating creatures like millipedes. Personally, I'd ditch the peat, keep the sphagnum and coco fiber, but make sure only 25% of the substrate is coco fiber. The rest should be ground-up decayed leaves, and that rotten wood you got, as well as some flake soil(decayed Traeger Oak pellets) and maybe a tiny bit of calcium, like limestone or cuttlebone. I'd recommend buying some flake soil for now, but consider looking into making your own, as the process is pretty simple once you have a tested and true method. If you're looking into keeping rhinoceros or stag beetles, learning how to make flake soil would be beneficial for those hobby fields as well.

Keep feeding bananas if that's what they like, but I recommend changing up your substrate.

As Arthroverts said, keep the temperature up as well. Too much ventilation for tropical millipedes can lead to desiccation, so watch out. Be sure to keep us updated :)
Thanks! Changed their substrate and bumped up the temperatures and they seem to be doing great!👍🏼
 
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