Central New York -- looking for millipedes/isopods.

cassraptor

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 16, 2017
Messages
10
Hello!! I live in Syracuse, Camillus more in specific. I'm looking for places to find interesting isopods and millipedes in my area or relatively close.

Most places I know are state forests and I dont believe i can take anything out of those.

Does anyone have any recs or is there anyone in the area who already has some of these inverts in their home?
 

Telsaro

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 20, 2017
Messages
37
Hello Cassraptor!

I used to live in the Syracuse area, Liverpool to be specific. I also lived in Ithaca.

The best place I know of that doesn't require a permit or permission from the land owner is the Finger Lakes National Forest. Its located between Cayuga and Seneca lake. It is about an hour and twenty minute drive from Camillus. You don't need a permit for collecting insects from national forests. (Source: http://www.theskepticalmoth.com/collecting-permits/)

Let us know what you find!
 

davehuth

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 24, 2017
Messages
250
Hello explorers: I have family in the Syracuse area and visit frequently. I've been learning about native millipedes, so I'm curious what anyone's been able to find around central NY? Anything interesting lurking out there? :)
 

Major 78

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 25, 2018
Messages
65
Not in central NY but very far upstate i found a millipede about 4" big...
 

Major 78

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 25, 2018
Messages
65
If it's redish it's Narceus americanus. I've seen them at taconic falls near ithaca
I don't recall. I don't even remember where it was lol. I was in some state park thing that was very far upstate, and I flipped the rock looking for some cool inverts and found it. Didn't bother to collect it though,I've never seen anything like it so I assumed it might be rare and dint want to take one from the wild.
 

JAFUENTES

Arachnodragon
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
215
I don't recall. I don't even remember where it was lol. I was in some state park thing that was very far upstate, and I flipped the rock looking for some cool inverts and found it. Didn't bother to collect it though,I've never seen anything like it so I assumed it might be rare and dint want to take one from the wild.
This is the largest species in upstate so it had to be that, great find since it was at an adult.
 

Major 78

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 25, 2018
Messages
65
This is the largest species in upstate so it had to be that, great find since it was at an adult.
It must be that, it had a bit of a reddish tint near the legs. I don't keep pedes though. Looked cool though. I always seem to have luck finding rare inverts in the wild. Idk if they was rare though.
 

JAFUENTES

Arachnodragon
Joined
Nov 26, 2014
Messages
215
It must be that, it had a bit of a reddish tint near the legs. I don't keep pedes though. Looked cool though. I always seem to have luck finding rare inverts in the wild. Idk if they was rare though.
rare over all no, at that size yes
 

Hydrophilus

Arachnopeon
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 18, 2015
Messages
29
Fellow Syracuse-area invert enthusiast here! Unfortunately we don't have much in the way of large, interesting isopods, and I don't know much about our millipedes. If you don't mind absurdly tiny isopods, in our area we have Hyloniscus riparius, Trichoniscus pusillus, and Haplophthalmus danicus. I've noticed that Hyloniscus predominate in areas that have been disturbed, Trichoniscus in more "pristine" areas since they were among the first non-native introductions when Europeans began importing vegetation containing soil in the 1500s. Porcellio spinicornis is pretty abundant in some of the larger cemeteries I have visited, they love the limestone headstones. None of these species are native, however. I have come across Petaserpes millipedes in the Rochester area, they are pretty neat but small.
 

The Odd Pet

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
May 5, 2019
Messages
118
Fellow Syracuse-area invert enthusiast here! Unfortunately we don't have much in the way of large, interesting isopods, and I don't know much about our millipedes. If you don't mind absurdly tiny isopods, in our area we have Hyloniscus riparius, Trichoniscus pusillus, and Haplophthalmus danicus. I've noticed that Hyloniscus predominate in areas that have been disturbed, Trichoniscus in more "pristine" areas since they were among the first non-native introductions when Europeans began importing vegetation containing soil in the 1500s. Porcellio spinicornis is pretty abundant in some of the larger cemeteries I have visited, they love the limestone headstones. None of these species are native, however. I have come across Petaserpes millipedes in the Rochester area, they are pretty neat but small.
Hi. I breed and sell a lot of exotic species of isopods. If you're interested send me a pm.
 
Top