Centipede macaroni

Draiman

Arachnoking
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The eggs have turned into the trademark "macaroni"-shaped embryos. Hopefully she's a good mother and these will turn into pedelings in about a month's time.

 

Steven

pede-a-holic
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Feb 18, 2003
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hehehe, great the term "macaroni" is getting used more :D

also congratz offcourse with the embryos :)
 

micheldied

Arachnoprince
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Awesome!
I just had a thought, remember when you said she was inactive, docile, not eating etc. ?
Could it be because she was about to lay?
Maybe you already figured it out...
 

Draiman

Arachnoking
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Awesome!
I just had a thought, remember when you said she was inactive, docile, not eating etc. ?
Could it be because she was about to lay?
Maybe you already figured it out...
Yeah, I think that was why she was acting that way. Or I suppose this species may simply have a lower metabolism rate than what I'm used to with Scolopendra subspinipes which can eat and eat and eat and eat and then expend all that energy running around like a deranged mental patient; and therefore eats less and is slower-moving.
 

Jürgen

Arachnoknight
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Jan 29, 2004
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Hello!

Nice work.

I dont think that she will eat them now.
My experince is that they eat only eggs if they are bad or something happen.
In this stadium i never lost plings but i dont say thats not possible ;)

good luck

regards
Jürgen
 

Draiman

Arachnoking
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Hello!

Nice work.

I dont think that she will eat them now.
My experince is that they eat only eggs if they are bad or something happen.
In this stadium i never lost plings but i dont say thats not possible ;)

good luck

regards
Jürgen
I agree :)

IME, if the mothers are going to eat their eggs, it's usually within the first 2-5 days, and in those cases I would guess it is because the eggs are not fertile. I think once that stage is over and the eggs are fertile, and conditions (humidity, temperature) are right, then the eggs almost certainly will not be eaten. But of course nobody can be 100% sure, especially with pedes. But I am confident about this clutch.
 

micheldied

Arachnoprince
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Yeah, I think that was why she was acting that way. Or I suppose this species may simply have a lower metabolism rate than what I'm used to with Scolopendra subspinipes which can eat and eat and eat and eat and then expend all that energy running around like a deranged mental patient; and therefore eats less and is slower-moving.
All the pedes I've had lay eggs (Mutilans) also became like that a few weeks prior to egg laying.
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
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Jul 18, 2010
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You know when I saw this I was amazed at how a centipede could be such a caring mother, they seem so gentle and sweet like this.
 
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