Carrion beetles feeding on a wallaby carcass

Bugs In Cyberspace

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Messages
721
I was disappointed a bit as your title suggested I might see a wallaby carcass. I saw some hair and some nice closeups of active larvae.

Just two seconds of perspective on the animal and setting would have been nice.

File under "constructive criticism", please.
 

dragonblade71

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 1, 2007
Messages
422
Actually, I think a lot of people should be grateful that I didn't show substantially more of the wallaby. Believe me, in it's current state, it was not a pretty sight! Though I do have some other shots showing a little bit more of the wallaby but excluding the gross bits. I had planned sometime to edit these together into some sort of montage.
 

ZephAmp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 8, 2008
Messages
530
Did you see any of the adult beetles? The larvae are Necrophila sp. and the only one here in the US is N. americana, so it would be awesome to see some pics of the adults that made those larvae. :)
 

jere000

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
106
Those are pretty cool looking, but is it's name really Necrophila sp.?That sounds close to something extremely gross.
 

dragonblade71

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 1, 2007
Messages
422
Did you see any of the adult beetles? The larvae are Necrophila sp. and the only one here in the US is N. americana, so it would be awesome to see some pics of the adults that made those larvae. :)
I don't often get to see these critters around here. I only recall seeing one other carcass with carrion beetles around this place and they looked different to these ones. Yea, it would be intriguing to see what the adults look like.

There was another invert crawling among them that I tried to get on video but it didn't make an appearance during the recording. It was black with a prominent red bulb looking thing at the front. It was quickly moving and quite agressive towards flies. If ever a fly would land near it, it would grab the fly and do away with it.
 

ZephAmp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 8, 2008
Messages
530
I don't often get to see these critters around here. I only recall seeing one other carcass with carrion beetles around this place and they looked different to these ones. Yea, it would be intriguing to see what the adults look like.

There was another invert crawling among them that I tried to get on video but it didn't make an appearance during the recording. It was black with a prominent red bulb looking thing at the front. It was quickly moving and quite agressive towards flies. If ever a fly would land near it, it would grab the fly and do away with it.

Did it resemble that by any chance? The adult beetles are very aggressive towards flies; the fly larvae, although they are food for the beetles/larvae, also compete with them to consume the carcass. So the adults are vicious towards them.
 

ZephAmp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 8, 2008
Messages
530
Those are pretty cool looking, but is it's name really Necrophila sp.?That sounds close to something extremely gross.
Yep, here in the US we have one species: Necrophila americana.
Translated literally it means "American Dead-Lover." :p
 

jere000

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
106
Yep, here in the US we have one species: Necrophila americana.
Translated literally it means "American Dead-Lover." :p
Wow who ever named that has a weird sense of humor lol.Do they only eat dead things I would assume from the name carrion beetles they do?
 

ZephAmp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 8, 2008
Messages
530
Wow who ever named that has a weird sense of humor lol.Do they only eat dead things I would assume from the name carrion beetles they do?
They will only lay their eggs and breed on carrion but they adult beetles can eat quite a few things ranging from nectar to mushrooms. They prefer meat though, of course. :p
 

dragonblade71

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 1, 2007
Messages
422

Did it resemble that by any chance?
Ah not quite but that shade of red is similar. It was black. Though it seemed less 'beetle-like' - narrower and perhaps slightly longer. The prominent red 'bulb' that I saw on it's front reminded me of rudolph the red nosed reindeer.
 
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ZephAmp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 8, 2008
Messages
530
Ah not quite but that shade of red is similar. It was black. Though it seemed less 'beetle-like' - narrower and perhaps slightly longer. The prominent red 'bulb' that I saw on it's front reminded me of rudolph the red nosed reindeer.
Hmm, it could be one of the many, many other species of carrion beetle.
When I put out my first carcass to monitor I was absolutely shocked by the variety of beetles that came to it.
I remember at one (a guinea pig) my friend and I flipped it over and found a gigantic Nicrophorus tomentosus. Don't try googling it to see what they look like; the coloration in every single picture does no justice to the actual coloration. I quickly caught it, with the intention of breeding it (it was so big it had to be a fertilized female). Just when I decided maybe I should put it back (to continue the species; there was only one at the carcass and I figured they're probably rare) it decided to fly out of the cup! ;P
They're definitely some of the most intriguing but overlooked animals of all time.
 

robd

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
May 19, 2009
Messages
374
I was disappointed a bit as your title suggested I might see a wallaby carcass. I saw some hair and some nice closeups of active larvae.

Just two seconds of perspective on the animal and setting would have been nice.

File under "constructive criticism", please.
Haha, my thoughts exactly.
 
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