Caresheet and life span of Psalmopoeus Pulcher?

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Arachnopeon
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Can't seem to find any other caresheets aside from Mike's Basic Tarantula

And I can't seem to find any detail about the lifespan of P. Pulcher
 

Chris LXXIX

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Nah you don't need care sheets and such. Assuming we are talking about a juve/adult, keep him/her just like a P.cambridgei.
A water dish always full and a bit of slightly moist portion of substrate are enough for mantain the humidity needed for those (btw you live in Asia and the weather is completely different from here where I live, important to consider).

About the lifespan, well, IMO this is an issue that, no matter, no one can predict 100%. There's folks that had female G.rosea and 'Brachy' that lived an helluva of time, others, offering a similar care, not. Anyway, females lives longer, obviously. Talking about "how much years exactly" IMO is futile sometimes, and not only T's related.
 

Chris LXXIX

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As for the set up, the classic arboreal one... I don't have a P.pulcher at the moment (nor I plan to buy one... I'm more into OW's obligate burrowers) but anyway, this is my set up for my juve P.cambridgei just for give you an idea. I would offer the same to a juve/adult P.pulcher.

Wimpy 2.jpg
 

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As for the set up, the classic arboreal one... I don't have a P.pulcher at the moment (nor I plan to buy one... I'm more into OW's obligate burrowers) but anyway, this is my set up for my juve P.cambridgei just for give you an idea. I would offer the same to a juve/adult P.pulcher.

View attachment 221919
Hm.... I'm getting myself a Pulcher sling.

I have a 5.5 inch wide, 6.3 inch tall plastic jar. Is this good enough for the sling?
 

Chris LXXIX

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Hm.... I'm getting myself a Pulcher sling.

I have a 5.5 inch wide, 6.3 inch tall plastic jar. Is this good enough for the sling?
IMO for my views even too big (especially if the sling in question is really a little baby) but aside for that, yes, no prob.
 

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IMO for my views even too big (especially if the sling in question is really a little baby) but aside for that, yes, no prob.

Can I just give the enclosure some substrate and something for the sling to climb on and not put anything else? (plants, decoration, etc)

I already punched some small holes on the sides.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Can I just give the enclosure some substrate and something for the sling to climb on and not put anything else? (plants, decoration, etc)

I already punched some small holes on the sides.
Ah :)
Are you kidding me? I mean, substrate... something (little) to climb, air holes. Never heard such a thing :pompous:

Yeah of course, man. Just joking. Consider however the sling size (which I don't know) and offer something suitable for that size... no need IMO for too "big" things.
 

cold blood

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Keep it in a 32oz deli cup with a water dish, a leaned piece of wood and plants surrounding the base of the wood. Keep part of the sub damp, its that easy.

Male Psalmos typically mature in 10 months to a year and a half....females should be good for 7 to maybe 10 years.

Care sheets are garbage, stop reading them with the intention of learning something.
 

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Keep it in a 32oz deli cup with a water dish, a leaned piece of wood and plants surrounding the base of the wood. Keep part of the sub damp, its that easy.

Male Psalmos typically mature in 10 months to a year and a half....females should be good for 7 to maybe 10 years.

Care sheets are garbage, stop reading them with the intention of learning something.
Maybe if I get some leaves and cut off a small branch from my tree?

Don't really have the budget for some fancy enclosure
 

cold blood

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Maybe if I get some leaves and cut off a small branch from my tree?

Don't really have the budget for some fancy enclosure
What? First time I've ever heard of a 32 oz deli cup referred to as a "fancy enclosure"...my god, they're free basically.

Spending $ on t enclosure is the keepers choice, more money spent doesn't equate to a better home for the t, just better aesthetics for the keeper.

I use wood from outside all the time, in fact, I refuse to pay for something that's free and basically everywhere....but I will say, you have to know what wood is harvestable and which wood to just walk past. Cutting fresh branches will result in lots of mold, very quickly. Likewise freshly fallen bark is not as good as it looks. Old rotted out wood can be great, but I try to focus on driftwood, I've always had good luck with that. The biggest key is to bake it to remove any excess moisture, wood needs to be as dry as possible.

Dry leaves can make excellent cover for small ts.
 

Venom1080

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Maybe if I get some leaves and cut off a small branch from my tree?

Don't really have the budget for some fancy enclosure
a 32oz deli cup???. lol you can often get one or several for free from local restaurants. make sure to bake the branch first to get rid of pests, dont use leaves, get some eco earth from a local pet store for sub.
 
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_scorpio_

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32oz deli cup
Dirt
Leaves/moss
Small chunk of wood

If it costs you much/anything your doing it wrong.
Boil anything used from outside, and avoid collecting things from places likely to be contaminated with pesticides or heavily polluted (like near a road etc.)
 

cold blood

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I NEVER boil wood, it goes directly against how I want the wood to be...dry. I rinse it, then bake it...boiling will only serve to absorb water deeper into the wood. People do it all the time, and I always scratch my head as to the logic behind boiling. Literally anything you are trying to kill off by boiling, will be done in just as easily by baking/heating it.
 

_scorpio_

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I NEVER boil wood, it goes directly against how I want the wood to be...dry. I rinse it, then bake it...boiling will only serve to absorb water deeper into the wood. People do it all the time, and I always scratch my head as to the logic behind boiling. Literally anything you are trying to kill off by boiling, will be done in just as easily by baking/heating it.
Very true, im just used to doing it for larger bits of wood for reptile enclosures, and they dont fit in my oven.
 

Venom1080

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I NEVER boil wood, it goes directly against how I want the wood to be...dry. I rinse it, then bake it...boiling will only serve to absorb water deeper into the wood. People do it all the time, and I always scratch my head as to the logic behind boiling. Literally anything you are trying to kill off by boiling, will be done in just as easily by baking/heating it.
i meant bake, oops.
 

viper69

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cold blood

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Very true, im just used to doing it for larger bits of wood for reptile enclosures, and they dont fit in my oven.
So you have pots to boil in that are bigger than your oven? What, are you boiling it over a giant witches bond fire?:astonished:
 

Lessej

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I try to focus on driftwood, I've always had good luck with that. The biggest key is to bake it to remove any excess moisture, wood needs to be as dry as possible.
+1 on driftwood, rinsed and baked. Perfect for inverts and reptiles.
 

_scorpio_

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So you have pots to boil in that are bigger than your oven? What, are you boiling it over a giant witches bond fire?:astonished:
Well, i pour boiling water over them until they are soaked and too hot to touch. It takes forever so im glad i can just cook things for little tarantula vivs now.
 

_scorpio_

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You should provide more than a container and a stick of wood for a T. You want it to THRIVE, not survive like it's living in some prison cell.
I agree to an extent, mainly because i find half the fun of it is making the Tarantula a good looking natural home, however im not sure the tarantula cares what it looks like, only that it feels safe, has the right conditions and enough food. I think if you filled it with plants and nice bits of wood etc. or just dirt and a flat piece of cork wood it wouldnt affect it given good temp, humidity, food etc. They web over the lot anyway.
Happy to be corrected if im wrong though, it will give me an excuse to spend more on plants and decor lol!
 
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