Care sheets?

Frank04

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
Messages
13
A lot of people on here say not to trust the care sheets on the Internet and from pet stores so I was wondering if someone on here could make me a basic care sheet for a pink toe tarantula? It would help a lot thank you.

By the way the tank in the picture isn't the right tank for this tarantula I know. I have a proper one coming in the mail.
 

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REEFSPIDER

Arachnobaron
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
412
There are a lot of threads posted on this topic you can find them by using google and typing "avic avic care arachnoboards" the search function of this site is hit or miss.
 

Python

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2005
Messages
631
I've often wondered about care sheets. People here have said not to trust care sheets as long as I can remember but what I've never understood is that googling almost any species will bring you page after page of this forum. Sure, there might be a few other pages sprinkled in the mix but the overwhelming majority of information about tarantulas on the internet is located right here. It seems to me that if a few volunteers were to sit down and create a few care sheets for this site, perhaps even create a category strictly for care sheets for different species, it might go a long way to promoting not only the hobby, but this site as well. It might even provide a resource for advocates to gather and try to work on getting some of the laws/ordinances changed for the betterment of the hobby.
 

Tim Benzedrine

Prankster Possum
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 4, 2004
Messages
1,452
I've said that we ought to do some of them collectively and they would be peer reviewed. Of course, that would result in some debate, but generally I think we'd come up with pretty solid ones.
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
This site should have a simple "care sheets" link. From there, the person could look up their specific tarantula. This would be an arachnoboards approved care set up. The beginner is asking about a pinktoe, which different members do care for differently. this is my setup for my avics: Vertical setup, water dish, I use jungle mix substrate, so I can mist the ground and over fill water without mold concerns and i mist every other day on their webs (very lightly and not on the actual tarantula). I feed both of mine 1-2 crickets a week. This is my setup, everyone's is a bit different.
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
The problem is there not just one way to keep most T species. I know, on here, we like to simply repeat the one way that will get you an agree or like. However, there are a lot of people who do things different and have had their Ts do well.

For example, some people mist others don't. Both work fine if you do them right. Feeders vary as does the amount people feed their Ts. What substrate people use and the stuff they put in their enclosures. How they setup an enclosure for different species.

I recently rehoused my smallest GBB. I gave it a good cork hide and a crazy bamboo skewer filled tank where it could web anywhere it wanted. It went up top and made a big web hammock and rarely touches the ground. Not your typical GBB setup (or behavior) but it works pretty good. It's eating like crazy and is doing well.

No one has made caresheets on here because I doubt we could all agree on what to put in one. :p
 

Abyss

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
281
The problem is there not just one way to keep most T species. I know, on here, we like to simply repeat the one way that will get you an agree or like. However, there are a lot of people who do things different and have had their Ts do well.

For example, some people mist others don't. Both work fine if you do them right. Feeders vary as does the amount people feed their Ts. What substrate people use and the stuff they put in their enclosures. How they setup an enclosure for different species.

I recently rehoused my smallest GBB. I gave it a good cork hide and a crazy bamboo skewer filled tank where it could web anywhere it wanted. It went up top and made a big web hammock and rarely touches the ground. Not your typical GBB setup (or behavior) but it works pretty good. It's eating like crazy and is doing well.

No one has made caresheets on here because I doubt we could all agree on what to put in one. :p
Fully agree yet i would still like to see it happen or attempt to happen anyway.

Aside from what you said........
Heres 1 thing i have noticed that bugs me to an extent.
As you correctly stated, there are many ways we keep various T's that work and what i see happen is all to often, someone asks a question and gets varied answers.
Often the response to said questions atks the credibility of each source and criticism is passed for "regurgetating info".
We as a community seem to expect newer keepers to take our advice on the premiss that we say so and that they trust our statements of "keeping T's for x ammount of years or whatever". Then in the next breath (or previous breath) we criticize ppl for taking outside advice which is often passed off the exact same way.
I have seen it first hand. Pet store employees pass miss info as fact and do so explaining how much they know or how much experience they have etc (the very same way we do).
Having kept T's fir years following VERY bad advice, having kept T's for years basically ignoring everything an learning on my own, and then finding my way has left me unique experience and mixed emosions on how some info is presented here and everywhere else.

That brings me to us criticizing ppl for NOT trying to dig the forums to find the desired info themselves. To me this is dead wrong and we should NOT continually say things like "theres already x ammount threads on this, go look it up yourself".
1) some of us (myself included) simply dont have time to read tirelessly every thread on a particulr subject till the desired answer is found
2) some of us (myself included) are simply VERY "tech stupid" and dont even know how alot of things work internet wise which is overwhelming and so we ask for help only to be redirected an criticized
3) we openly bash care sheets an oet stores here (ritefully so mind you) yet we often direct ppl to do their own research and thats the info that vomes up that looks the most "proper" or "official" so in essence we are directing ppl to the very care sheets we say dont listen to.

I say if someone asks a question, they are doing so because they need/want an answer.
We are supposedly here to help ppl so we need to answer the questions no matter how many times they have been answered. If thats too frustrating/difficult then why are you here to help lol?

Rant over lol :)
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
I looked for advice everywhere I could when I got my t Stirmi. In the end I pretty much copied someone's setup and husbandry that has successfully kept theraphosa for many years. I also read poec's posts, since he had a bunch of wc stirmi he successfully raised. Very confusing finding reliable information to say the least.

I think senior members have been on these boards too long if they get grumpy when anxious newbies post care questions. Also, they need a break if they get bent out of shape over slight care variations from their own.
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Messages
556
I think senior members have been on these boards too long if they get grumpy when anxious newbies post care questions. Also, they need a break if they get bent out of shape over slight care variations from their own.
YEAH! LOLOLOL HE'S TALKING TO YOU! LOLOLOL
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,884
That brings me to us criticizing ppl for NOT trying to dig the forums to find the desired info themselves. To me this is dead wrong and we should NOT continually say things like "theres already x ammount threads on this, go look it up yourself".
1) some of us (myself included) simply dont have time to read tirelessly every thread on a particulr subject till the desired answer is found
2) some of us (myself included) are simply VERY "tech stupid" and dont even know how alot of things work internet wise which is overwhelming and so we ask for help only to be redirected an criticized
3) we openly bash care sheets an oet stores here (ritefully so mind you) yet we often direct ppl to do their own research and thats the info that vomes up that looks the most "proper" or "official" so in essence we are directing ppl to the very care sheets we say dont listen to.
To add to what was said here:

If you're a brand new keeper, you likely don't know how to separate the good advice from the bad advice. Both good advice and bad advice come with assurances that the person is speaking from experience.

Let's assume that novice keeper takes our advice and tries the internal search function (or Googling arachnoboards.com). There are often dozens of results, especially if you don't refine the search. Much of the good advice on this forum is buried within lengthy threads, and sometimes you have to read multiple replies or threads to get a complete answer.

So you end up with a situation where a brand new keeper who doesn't know how to distinguish good advice from bad advice is presented with a choice of: (1) a concise care sheet with headings and (2) having to piece together a correct answer from pages of replies in two dozen search results.

It's no wonder Avics die in wet, stuffy cages.

Experienced keepers understand that there are many ways to skin a cat. But surely there are some foolproof setups for the common beginner species that could be presented in a concise format? Things we can all agree won't harm the tarantula? (Don't call it a "care sheet" if doing so would undermine advice to ignore those other care sheets.)

If this concise information is posted in a conspicuous place, there will be fewer "how do I take care of my new rose-hair tarantula" threads. Or at the very least, instead of telling people to use the search function (and hoping for the best), you would have a collection of easy reference links.

And if, after 10 years, you're tired of answering the same forum questions over and over again, just ignore those threads. This community is large enough that there is always someone who can answer those questions. (Many of those beginner questions can be competently answered by intermediate keepers.)
 
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Frank04

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 30, 2016
Messages
13
To add to what was said here:

If you're a brand new keeper, you likely don't know how to separate the good advice from the bad advice. Both good advice and bad advice come with assurances that the person is speaking from experience.

Let's assume that novice keeper takes our advice and tries the internal search function (or Googling arachnoboards.com). There are often dozens of results, especially if you don't refine the search. Much of the good advice on this forum is buried within lengthy threads, and sometimes you have to read multiple replies or threads to get a complete answer.

So you end up with a situation where a brand new keeper who doesn't know how to distinguish good advice from bad advice is presented with a choice of: (1) a concise care sheet with headings and (2) having to piece together a correct answer from pages of replies in two dozen search results.

It's no wonder Avics get die in wet, stuffy cages.

Experienced keepers understand that there are many ways to skin a cat. But surely there are some foolproof setups for the common beginner species that could be presented in a concise format? (Don't call it a "care sheet" if doing so would undermine advice to ignore those other care sheets.)

If this concise information is posted in a conspicuous place, there will be fewer "how do I take care of my new rose-hair tarantula" threads. Or at the very least, instead of telling people to use the search function (and hoping for the best), you would have a collection of easy reference links.

And if, after 10 years, you're tired of answering the same forum questions over and over again, just ignore those threads. This community is large enough that there is always someone who can answer those questions. (Many of those beginner questions can be competently answered by intermediate keepers.)
Yeah I see a lot of people saying this and that on here and I just don't know what's right and wrong. I over think stuff really bad too so it would be nice to have a place where I could get solid advice and information
 

johnny quango

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 17, 2013
Messages
262
@Frank04 The best advice I could offer you is this.. Imagine the community of fellow keepers here on ab as the same as a collection of tarantulas we are fundamentally the same but we all have our own little quirky ways. Some of us can be grumpy sometimes (you know who you are) Some are comedians (you also know who you are) and some are crazy (well at least 1of us).

If you have a question no matter how simple it may be or even if you feel a little stupid for asking it just ask it I can with 100% conviction say it will get answered it may only take a minute or a day and the good thing is as @Ungoliant stated sometimes information gets buried in long threads but you may learn something you never thought to ask.
Welcome to arachnoboards and the addiction I mean hobby
 

nathanc

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 7, 2017
Messages
1
i just got my rose hair 2 weeks ago and she was out and walking around for about a week and a half. a few days ago she went into her hide and closed the front up with webbing. she hasent eaten since i got her and today i pulled half the webbing down to see if she was okay. she became very aggressive and ignored the cricket i gave her...i was wondering if anybody had an idea what is going on???
 

Rittdk01

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
264
^^^^could be ready for a molt. Don't mess with the webbing or dig up a burrowed tarantula. The t will come out when its hungry and/or recovered from molting.
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
i just got my rose hair 2 weeks ago and she was out and walking around for about a week and a half. a few days ago she went into her hide and closed the front up with webbing. she hasent eaten since i got her and today i pulled half the webbing down to see if she was okay. she became very aggressive and ignored the cricket i gave her...i was wondering if anybody had an idea what is going on???
When they web like that they are trying to get protection or hide. Think of it like a big Do Not Disturb sign and leave them be. Some Ts do this before molting and others just want to feel secure. When you tore down her web she likely thought you were a predator trying to eat her. Next time she webs up top off the water and let her be. She'll come out when it needs to. At most I would put a prekilled prey item in there away from the webbed opening if she has been in there a long time (weeks or months).
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,028
Care sheets create confusion and create the belief that every species has its own unique care, which just isnt true aside from possibly Theraposa. Care sheets instantly make a simple endeavor a more complicated one.

Terrestrials basically have 2 ways to keep....theres the ones that require moisture, and theres the ones that dont....the only real differrence is the adding of water to keep the sub appropriately damp.

Onto arboreals theres basically 2 types...theres the "true" arboreals, like iridopelma and Avicularia....theyre kept one way....predominantly dry sub, water and good ventilation with plants surtounding the mid to top sections of vertical wood.

All other arboreals prefer slightly damp sub, and because they are really not arboreal their whole lives, you surround the base and mid sections of the wood with plants.

Slings are even easier as they all require damp sub when very small. So slings are practically kept the same across the board with the exception of those avics (and a few arid species) that do best kept basically as their adult counterparts are, just on a smaller scale.

So, basically care sheets are pointless, as if i were making them, it would be incredibly redundant writing the exact same things over and over.

Ignore care sheets, dont ask for more...simplify people....more sheets means more needless complications and more confusion, not less.
 
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cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,028
Avics die in wet stuffy cages BECAUSE of care sheets, and its almost entirely the fault of these sheets and their insistence on those high humidity numbers....making things worse is the fact that most care sheets completely ignore ventilation factors, which is the single most important thing with regards to thier husbandry.
 

Matttoadman

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 11, 2016
Messages
216
I guess you could argue the most important thing to glean from a care sheet is how often you rewater the substrate.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,884
Terrestrials basically have 2 ways to keep....theres the ones that require moisture, and theres the ones that dont....the only real differrence is the adding of water to keep the sub appropriately damp.

Onto arboreals theres basically 2 types...theres the "true" arboreals, like iridopelma and Avicularia....theyre kept one way....predominantly dry sub, water and good ventilation with plants surtounding the mid to top sections of vertical wood.

All other arboreals prefer slightly damp sub, and because they are really not arboreal their whole lives, you surround the base and mid sections of the wood with plants.

Slings are even easier as they all require damp sub when very small. So slings are practically kept the same across the board with the exception of those avics (and a few arid species) that do best kept basically as their adult counterparts are, just on a smaller scale.

So, basically care sheets are pointless, as if i were making them, it would be incredibly redundant writing the exact same things over and over.
I would describe the four basic care regimens and just link to one of the four for each common beginner species.

Accuracy aside, the main advantage of the care sheet format is that it presents the information in an organized and concise manner. As a novice keeper, it can be intimidating to try to sift through lengthy discussions -- and that's assuming you are even reading good discussions (as opposed to whatever you might encounter on Facebook or other Web sites).
 
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