Can you tell the age of your T by size?

jesstarantula<3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
11
I have a female 4.75" Grammostola rosea and the pet store I bought her from new nothing about her so just kinda curious as to about how old she is.
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
Messages
733
Jess, No. If the temps are up and fed frequently they can molt frequently and grow much faster. You'll likely find more than you need on this subject by using the search function. Good luck and welcome aboard.

:)

Terry

P.S. I wouldn't have a clue of the age of your spider in years. However, if you are certain of size and sex it does sound like an adult female to me.
 

redrumpslump

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 22, 2009
Messages
336
All you have to do is lift her up and look on the bottom of her abdomen and count how many rings there is on it. Each ring is a year.....hahah I'm just joking but Terry pretty much nailed it on the head
 

jesstarantula<3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 26, 2010
Messages
11
Yeah I sexed her myself and even took a fresh molt to my school zoology teacher for a second opinion and she is deff. a female. but thanks for the help.
 

Vespula

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 27, 2010
Messages
707
Umm... I don't think size is a good indicator of age. Some t's can live for a long time, and are slow growers, this means they could be 5-10 yrs old and only a few inches.
 

Anubis77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
268
If it's wild caught, you could approximate using the lowest estimate on when females of that species mature in the wild. Going off the estimate that Aphonopelma spp. in the Southwest mature around 7-10 years, I can reasonably say that the adult females I've caught are ~10 years at the least. 5 probably not, 20+ doubtful, but possible, given that they're wild.

That's completely excluding possible variations in their environments, like an abnormally long monsoon season that increases prey availability. Something like periodical cicadas would throw off the estimate completely wherever their range overlaps tarantulas' every 17 years.
 

Redneck

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 1, 2009
Messages
1,393
I still have some G. rosea slings that I hatched out back in October... Almost a year later.. They are not even 1" yet.. I powerfeed them to.. As much as they want.. Keep them at 80-90 degrees F... Growing super slow... SUPERRRR SLOOOOWW......
 

joshuai

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 10, 2008
Messages
821
I have a pseudhapalopus sp. blue that is about one and a quarter inch and i have had it for about two years at eighty degrees give or take and it is by far the slowest grower i have seen!
 
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