can you tame t's?

lychas

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as far as i know you cannot, there are some that are naturally able to be handled but i do not believe you can tame them, is that right? is there a scientific explanation why they cannot be tamed?
 

ironmonkey78

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nope

ive never seen a tame T. If you handle them alot then certain ones can get accustom to being handled. thats about what ive heard.
some people like to loop everything together in that if you can handle it its tame. theres a huge difference however, between tame and touchable.
 

lychas

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i know certain species can be handled but what about some of the old world t's like selenocosmia or other asians, i have never seen one that will let you handle it
 

dukegarda

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I agree with what ironmonkey said, however. I think there is a difference to WC, a CB Ts. I have a CB rosea, and a WC one. They have VERY VERY different "personalities". One is very docile, and has never snapped out at the chop sticks or my hand, while the other is aggressive (yes aggressive, not defensive (I read the article). She will chase things down, run after them in jolts of speed.

So there is a difference, but whether they're tame or not, I don't know. In the end it comes down to literature and the meaning of words, and how you interpret them.
 

speedreader

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Spiders don't have brains as such, unlike mammals. Their neural circuits are too simple for complex programs that taming entails.
 

lychas

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thanks speedreader, that what i was after, i know some are naturally calm but i havent heard of people taming t's
 

Talkenlate04

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If you handle them alot then certain ones can get accustom to being handled.
No offense but you could not be more wrong. They don't remember things like being handled. They are simpler then that, they react rather then remember.

One is very docile, and has never snapped out at the chop sticks or my hand, while the other is aggressive (yes aggressive, not defensive (I read the article). She will chase things down, run after them in jolts of speed.
How can it be aggression? She would not have attacked if you had not stuck the chopsticks in the tank near her, so that’s a reaction thus defensiveness. Same with dropping something in the tank, she is reacting in defense.
 

dukegarda

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Can you imagine a guy wearing a red coat, white slacks, big black boots, holding a chair, and cracking a whip at a giant T. blondi? ROFL {D
 

lychas

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speedreader, any chance you can elaborate on that stament a bit more aswell?
 

speedreader

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lychas, i will do some reading on it... i am not an expert on tarantula anatomy, but basically they have a primitive neural network. Although science doesn't understand the specifics of brain function or those of a neural network, it is known that the latter is far, far simpler.
 

Talkenlate04

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They are somewhat like fish, most fish like a goldfish have a memory span of less then 1 second. But the cool part is even with a tiny brain and no memory capacity they remember were food was dropped in the tank and at about what time each day.
So with that in mind. Maybe Ts could learn a thing or two. Nothing like roll over or don't bite me. But who knows.
 

lychas

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ok thanks, i told some people on another forum that spiders are to simple to be tamed and they started calling me simple, lol people amuse me
 

lychas

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actually fish are quite smart, the 1 or 5 second memory thing is just a myth, if they only had a 1second memory they wouldnt survive, they need to remember where to find food, what food is good and what isnt, what predators are and what they look like, they can also remember their friends
 

Feathers

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Nope

Tame -

1. changed from the wild or savage state; domesticated: a tame bear (although reverting back to it's wild state is a distinct possibility).
2. without the savageness or fear of humans normal in wild animals; gentle, fearless, or without shyness, as if domesticated: That lion acts as tame as a house cat.
3. tractable, docile, or submissive.

With Ts, it's all about chemicals - stimulus and response.
 

speedreader

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there is the short term memory and the long term memory - big difference.
1sec referred to the former, i believe.
Lychas, all your examples refer to long term memory.
 

speedreader

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Tame -

1. changed from the wild or savage state; domesticated: a tame bear (although reverting back to it's wild state is a distinct possibility).
2. without the savageness or fear of humans normal in wild animals; gentle, fearless, or without shyness, as if domesticated: That lion acts as tame as a house cat.
3. tractable, docile, or submissive.

With Ts, it's all about chemicals - stimulus and response.

"with life, it's all about chemicals - stimulus and response." :)

Btw, I think definition 1. is the most relevant one here.
 

dukegarda

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@talkentake

I know what you mean. She is in fact reacting to the presence of the chopsticks there. Probably 'hunting'. That still doesn't explain why one does it, and the other doesn't.
 

Talkenlate04

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Hmm I thought the food seeking thing was ingrained in their instincts not a thought process, just like mating and such is instinct as well.
I have to find the article where they put some electrified string in a tank, and every time the fish neared the string the shocked the fish. The fish kept coming back to it over and over again, and getting shocked over and over again. To me that shows no capacity to learn or retain.
Someone on here I think it was maybe Codemonkey shared an experiment with roaches.... an electrified plate that would shock the roach if it had all 6 of its legs down on the plate but if it lifted one up the shocking would stop. It eventually learned to keep on leg up. There was something else about then they cut off the head and the body still lifted one leg. I might be wrong but I was amazed by that study.
 

Merfolk

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I think they can learn and remember very simple things, but as far as domesticating goes, you can't exect it from an animal that can't see or hear you. There is no way to reward it in a way they would notice, I really don't think they know the concept of pleasure and reward. And how do you punish an animal that can go long without food and doen't seem to feel pain.

Bottom line : whatever the brain of an animal, if you can't communicate with it, you won't never tame it!
 
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