Can the Asian forest scorpion live in room temperature?

Noiselessx

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 25, 2021
Messages
10
I am about to get the above-mentioned scorpion, and I was wondering whether I can keep it between 20 C and 23 C or should I use an external heater?
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
1,205
This temperature range is safe. However, please be aware that their metabolism will be slightly reduced in this range, resulting in somewhat lower activity and appetite. If you're getting a baby or juvenile, development will be slower. Additionally, if you intend to try breeding, higher temperatures are required. I find my Heterometrus tend to be noticeably more active in summer when the temperature is in the 26-32ºC range in my room (at least someone likes my lack of air conditioning).
 

CRX

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 28, 2008
Messages
309
I have a young one and I keep him around 72-74 degrees Fahrenheit, but I supplement it with a heating pad at night or days when it gets really cold. I know this is pretty low for the species, I'm working on raising the temperature.
 

Dry Desert

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
933
I am about to get the above-mentioned scorpion, and I was wondering whether I can keep it between 20 C and 23 C or should I use an external heater?
20 - 23c is way too low. Being tropical forest floor dwellers they need a constant 28 - 30c.
I doubt they would even eat regularly at that temp.
Then we would have one more post " my scorpion won't eat ".
 

CRX

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 28, 2008
Messages
309
20 - 23c is way too low. Being tropical forest floor dwellers they need a constant 28 - 30c.
I doubt they would even eat regularly at that temp.
Then we would have one more post " my scorpion won't eat ".
I have kept mine at around 23c for the past 6 or 7 months., he even has molted one time. I will agree its not optimal, but I haven't had any other choice. He has fed and been fine.
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
1,205
20 - 23c is way too low. Being tropical forest floor dwellers they need a constant 28 - 30c.
I doubt they would even eat regularly at that temp.
Then we would have one more post " my scorpion won't eat ".
They eat regularly at that temperature. Not quite as voraciously, to be sure, but they do eat and moult successfully. Mine have had regular summer and winter cycles where winter temps range from 20-24° and summer temps range from 26-32°. They have not suffered at all, and have grown at a rate that is within the normal range for the species.
 

Edan bandoot

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
1,210
20 - 23c is way too low. Being tropical forest floor dwellers they need a constant 28 - 30c.
I doubt they would even eat regularly at that temp.
Then we would have one more post " my scorpion won't eat ".
They do fine at this temperature and regularly face cooler temps in nature
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
1,205
They also *burrow underground to escape heat*, a tactic they’ve evolved because they live in a climate that is frequently excessively hot.
 

Dry Desert

Arachnoangel
Active Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
933
They also *burrow underground to escape heat*, a tactic they’ve evolved because they live in a climate that is frequently excessively hot.
They don't burrow deep, they are not desert scorpions, they stay near the surface under leaf litter, and enjoy the warmth.
The majority of times inverts , burrow is to find their preferred moisture gradient
That's why forest scorpions don't burrow, as some other species do, as their preferred moisture and temperature range is at or near the surface.
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Messages
1,205
They exist at those temperatures, not thrive.
What is the definition of thriving for a Heterometrus?
Everyone in this thread agrees that in the 20-23° range they are somewhat less active and eat a bit less, which is a function of lowered metabolic rate. Is high metabolism “thriving”? It’s an interesting philosophical question I think. Do the scorpions enjoy life less when their metabolism is slightly reduced? Do they live statistically shorter lives? In nature, lower metabolic rate tends to correlate with longer life rather than shorter.
Clearly if you want to see your animal out and moving around and hunting frequently, then keeping them at a higher temperature is the way to achieve this. What’s less obvious is whether this is actually quantitatively better for the animal.
 
Top