Can someone ID this spider?

Bunyan van Asten

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 5, 2016
Messages
265
Hey everyone, i just fornd this spider in the bathroom, and i've never seen this species before, so i thought i might look here to know more about it. 20170210_153934(0).jpg If i am able to get a right enclosure for her, i'll keep her otherwise i'll just set her back in the bathroom. Any advice on what i should put in the terrarium is appreciated!
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,826
I am not very familiar with European spiders, but this may be a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae, genus Amaurobius) or funnel weaver (family Agelenidae).

If you can provide any clearer, brighter pictures (especially of the eyes and spinnerets), that may help.

Either family is easy to keep. You just need to provide a small hide with lots of anchor points for webbing. The most reliable way to provide water is to place drops in the web, as they are not accustomed to drinking from something like a water dish.
 

Bunyan van Asten

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 5, 2016
Messages
265
i'm
I am not very familiar with European spiders, but this may be a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae, genus Amaurobius) or funnel weaver (family Agelenidae).

If you can provide any clearer, brighter pictures (especially of the eyes and spinnerets), that may help.

Either family is easy to keep. You just need to provide a small hide with lots of anchor points for webbing. The most reliable way to provide water is to place drops in the web, as they are not accustomed to drinking from something like a water dish.
taking better pictures right now, i'll post a reply on another account just wait a few minutes
and thank you so much for the info!
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
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IMG_1522.JPG IMG_1518.JPG IMG_1522.JPG
I am not very familiar with European spiders, but this may be a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae, genus Amaurobius) or funnel weaver (family Agelenidae).

If you can provide any clearer, brighter pictures (especially of the eyes and spinnerets), that may help.

Either family is easy to keep. You just need to provide a small hide with lots of anchor points for webbing. The most reliable way to provide water is to place drops in the web, as they are not accustomed to drinking from something like a water dish.
here they are
 

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Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,826
I'm leaning toward Amaurobius. Some Steatoda (family Theridiidae) can look similar, but yours doesn't look male, and females are normally a lot rounder in the abdomen.

Did you see what kind of web it was in? Amaurobiids build a sort of funnel web, whereas a cobweb (theridiids) just looks like an irregular array of silk lines.
 
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