Can a tarantula kill a dog if it were to bite it ?

Danielle98Barnes

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
2
Hello,I'm new here so forgive me and my awkwardness as I'm trying to get the hang of using this forum.
I have a question and I was wondering if anybody would be able to help me.
I am fairly new at the hobby but I'm pretty confident that I've grasped the basics.
I've done loads of research on the internet about tarantulas and their specific requirements from humidity to different enclosures.
I am moving to manchester to live with my aunt and she has agreed I can take my tarantula with me (A.chalcodes). I plan on getting a GBB sling in a few weeks.
I know some people might be thinking that I'm rushing into buying more tarantulas but I've had previous experience with 2 other Ts (G. Rosea) and I feel pretty confident that I'm ready to take the next step. Im going for a GBB because they are pretty hardy, make fabulous webbing and although they can be skittish they are not overall defensive. Plus they make great display pets and are at a 'middle level' of you like.
My question is, because my aunt has 3 dogs ( Jack Russel terriers) if God forbid my tarantula was to escape (although I don't see that happening but just incase ) and it was to bite any of her dogs would her dogs die from the bite or just be unwell for a few days ?
I have tried finding the answer online but all I can find are answers on bites from black widows and Wolf spiders.
Obviously I don't plan on letting my T loose and I always make sure I close the lid on her enclosure properly but I just want to let my aunt know what could happen if somehow the T got out.
Any answers would be appreciated! Sorry for my poor sentencing, I haven't slept properly and I'm absolutely knackered. The joys of insomnia
Thankyou in advance
Danielle
 

BobBarley

Arachnoprince
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
1,480
GBB is a fine choice. Be prepared for bursts of speed though!

I seriously doubt any NW t (perhaps Psalmopoeus sp. could... but that's questionable) kill a dog. Maybe a newborn puppy? These guys' bites are likened to bee sting level venom. The bite would probably irritate the dog, but if anything, it would probably be fatal for the t because the dog could very easily kill it.
 

Danielle98Barnes

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
2
Thankyou so much for your fast reply. My mind has been put at ease and I can gladly tell my aunt that her dogs life isn't at risk if my T were to escape.
Yeah, I've heard of there famous spouts of speed so I'll be sure to be more cautious around them.
Thankyou once again
Danielle
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
I would agree with @BobBarley ;) Not sure many taranutlas could kill a fully grown dog, possibly a few of the OW tarantulas, but even that can be a stretch. Almost all NW you will ever get (especially beginner species) have extremely weak venom and I'd more concerned with your dogs killing it. You are 100% fine, just make sure the dogs can't get to the cage :D If any got bit, it would probably hurt the dog a little but it would be fine after a day or two tops. Especially with a sling, it probably couldn't actually bite the dogs with its small fangs. Nice choice, love GBBs. On the "too many T's" note, this hobby is very addicting, you'll know soon enough :vamp:
 

Danielle98Barnes

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
2
Thankyou for your reply.
My tarantulas will be kept in my bedroom (up stairs) so it's highly unlikely the dogs will even know the tarantulas are even in the house as they are not allowed upstairs.
Haha, I've got to admit I am pretty addicted to the hobby already ! In the future I plan on getting a few more Ts but for now I'm just going to look after the ones I already have and I'm going to take my time. Who knows in a few years I might even be able to get my hands on the amazing P. Metalica !
Thankyou
Danielle
 

boina

Lady of the mites
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Mar 25, 2015
Messages
2,205
There is an Australian study that, of course, I can't find right now :meh:, and this study is, as far as I know, the only one to ever study tarantula venom effect on dogs. They had about a handful of confirmed, accidental tarantula bites in dogs - and ALL DOGS DIED. The study concluded that dogs are more sensitive to tarantula venom than humans. However, they were investigating Australian tarantulas that have a significantly stronger venom than New World tarantulas like Aphonopelma. Since there are no reports of dogs dying from tarantula bites in America I'd think Aphonopelma bites won't kill a dog. I'd still be very careful.
 

BobBarley

Arachnoprince
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
1,480
There is an Australian study that, of course, I can't find right now :meh:, and this study is, as far as I know, the only one to ever study tarantula venom effect on dogs. They had about a handful of confirmed, accidental tarantula bites in dogs - and ALL DOGS DIED. The study concluded that dogs are more sensitive to tarantula venom than humans. However, they were investigating Australian tarantulas that have a significantly stronger venom than New World tarantulas like Aphonopelma. Since there are no reports of dogs dying from tarantula bites in America I'd think Aphonopelma bites won't kill a dog. I'd still be very careful.
I guess that's possible, but there's a huge difference in NW and OW t's. My advice to the OP is just be careful, I doubt a NW could kill a dog.
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,079
There is an Australian study that, of course, I can't find right now :meh:, and this study is, as far as I know, the only one to ever study tarantula venom effect on dogs. They had about a handful of confirmed, accidental tarantula bites in dogs - and ALL DOGS DIED. The study concluded that dogs are more sensitive to tarantula venom than humans. However, they were investigating Australian tarantulas that have a significantly stronger venom than New World tarantulas like Aphonopelma. Since there are no reports of dogs dying from tarantula bites in America I'd think Aphonopelma bites won't kill a dog. I'd still be very careful.
That rings a bell. I've read Selenocosmia (Aussie Whistling tarantulas) cause death due to dogs having a massively hard time with it.
 

Danielle98Barnes

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 21, 2017
Messages
2
Oh wow that wasnt what I was expecting. Those poor dogs. I'll be very careful. I'll make sure I close the lid properly and I will make sure my bedroom door is shut at all times. That way if the T does decide to go for a wander it can only be in one place, my bedroom.
Thankyou everyone who has replied to my question. You have all been really helpful and very friendly l.
Danielle
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jan 15, 2017
Messages
675
NW venom is very mild on mammals, in comparison to OWs. Jack russels are pretty hyper (I know from having one). So just make sure the Ts are up high enough to not get knocked over.
 

Dennis Nedry

Arachnodemon
Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
673
I get that this is late but for anybody who might read this or if OP is still active, you never know how the venom might react with a dog. Wolf spiders can apparently put even decent sized dogs in a bad way but funnel webs have almost no effect. P. crassipes and either Selenotypus or Selenotholus apparently are almost always fatal to dogs, I assume most old worlds would be the same. Not sure abouta GBB though, they aren't too aggressive anyways so I doubt the dog would get bit
 

SingaporeB

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 25, 2013
Messages
40
because my aunt has 3 dogs ( Jack Russel terriers) if God forbid my tarantula was to escape (although I don't see that happening
NO.

Zero chance of a tarantula killing a dog. If one of your spiders gets loose and one of those Jack Russel terriers gets to it the spider is dead and dead quick. They would probably eat it. I'm sure I lost an avic avic to my dog this way.

No danger to a cat either.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
NO.

Zero chance of a tarantula killing a dog. If one of your spiders gets loose and one of those Jack Russel terriers gets to it the spider is dead and dead quick. They would probably eat it. I'm sure I lost an avic avic to my dog this way.

No danger to a cat either.
Well, despite the fact that I can agree with you about a lot (first thing first, the fact that when/if happens a 'Dog/Cat VS a Theraphosidae' scenario isn't written at all that the spider even manage to bite, mostly the one that ends very, but very bad, are the latter) certain Australian T's venom is pretty potent and you don't want a bite from those on your dog.

But yes... I think that majority of NW T's (especially those lazy lovely 'pet rocks') venom isn't big deal for an adult dog (let alone a 'colossus' like Cane Corso, Mastino Napoletano etc).
 

basin79

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,079
NO.

Zero chance of a tarantula killing a dog. If one of your spiders gets loose and one of those Jack Russel terriers gets to it the spider is dead and dead quick. They would probably eat it. I'm sure I lost an avic avic to my dog this way.

No danger to a cat either.
If an aussie T bites a Jack Russell terrier you'll more than likely be burying the dog. To type there's ZERO chance of a tarantula killing a dog is irresponsible.
 

Nightshady

Dislike Harvester
Joined
Oct 24, 2017
Messages
266
If an aussie T bites a Jack Russell terrier you'll more than likely be burying the dog. To type there's ZERO chance of a tarantula killing a dog is irresponsible.
If I remember correctly, the LD50 for the MOST potent tarantula venom is around 7-8lbs. Since most Jack’s are around 15lbs, even the most potent T venom wouldn’t kill an adult Jack. A puppy? Perhaps.

The OP was taking about NW’s anyway, so it’s not incorrect to say that the dogs are 100% safe from death in this case for sure.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
If I remember correctly, the LD50 for the MOST potent tarantula venom is around 7-8lbs. Since most Jack’s are around 15lbs, even the most potent T venom wouldn’t kill an adult Jack. A puppy? Perhaps.

The OP was taking about NW’s anyway, so it’s not incorrect to say that the dogs are 100% safe from death in this case for sure.
Yeah, I understand what you mean. But we need always to consider (and btw now I'm talking only about those Aussie/Asians potent venom ones) that, aside the LD50 facts, can always enters post bite effects (effects that can happens as well when we are involved, of course) plus the whole - at bite moment - dog health conditions at 360°.
 

Nightshady

Dislike Harvester
Joined
Oct 24, 2017
Messages
266
Yeah, I understand what you mean. But we need always to consider (and btw now I'm talking only about those Aussie/Asians potent venom ones) that, aside the LD50 facts, can always enters post bite effects (effects that can happens as well when we are involved, of course) plus the whole - at bite moment - dog health conditions at 360°.
Don’t disagree... I was strictly talking about venom potency effects. Realistically secondary effects are unlikely as well though.

Anaphylaxis requires a previous exposure, and sepsis from a secondary infection, although possible, would be extremely unlikely as well.

I’m sure we can agree that probably not best for an OW to bite a small dog though haha.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
Don’t disagree... I was strictly talking about venom potency effects. Realistically secondary effects are unlikely as well though.

Anaphylaxis requires a previous exposure, and sepsis from a secondary infection, although possible, would be extremely unlikely as well.

I’m sure we can agree that probably not best for an OW to bite a small dog though haha.
No, it's not that I disagree, eh. At all.

Just that I'm one of those kind of mans that love to consider always the 'what if?' situations. For instance, when a S.calceatum or H.maculata bites an adult man (and I mean an healthy adult man) isn't rare at all (even if that's not always the 'rule') to have heart palpitations and similar issues. Not of course a thing to take lightly.

Well, so I think... "why in a dog, bitten by that same spider, can't happen the same?" combined with the fact that, maybe, said dog had suffered prior about similar issues, not related to bites/venom at all.

I mean... all of those kind of things which I tend a bit if not to overworry, to remain always doubtful :)
 

boina

Lady of the mites
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Mar 25, 2015
Messages
2,205
If I remember correctly, the LD50 for the MOST potent tarantula venom is around 7-8lbs. Since most Jack’s are around 15lbs, even the most potent T venom wouldn’t kill an adult Jack. A puppy? Perhaps.

The OP was taking about NW’s anyway, so it’s not incorrect to say that the dogs are 100% safe from death in this case for sure.
The LD50 in rats/mice will tell you nothing about how a dog is going to be affected. Here is study about the effects of Australian tarantula bites in dogs. 7/7 dogs bitten by Australian tarantulas died. Dogs are more sensitive to tarantula venom than rats/mice. LD50 values don't tell you much, if anything, about how other species will react to the venom in question. No, you can't say dogs are 100% safe from NW tarantulas either.
 

Nightshady

Dislike Harvester
Joined
Oct 24, 2017
Messages
266
The LD50 in rats/mice will tell you nothing about how a dog is going to be affected. Here is study about the effects of Australian tarantula bites in dogs. 7/7 dogs bitten by Australian tarantulas died. Dogs are more sensitive to tarantula venom than rats/mice. LD50 values don't tell you much, if anything, about how other species will react to the venom in question. No, you can't say dogs are 100% safe from NW tarantulas either.
Wow, that’s very interesting! I wish I could see the full article to see the specifics... as someone who reads medical journals frequently, I’ve learned you have to verify the study past the abstact to ensure its validity.

I tried a PubMed search to see if anyone has studied why canines might be more effected by the venom and couldn’t find anything. LD50 can certainly be effected by species but not usually by such an exponential scale. Makes me quite curious about the specifics of that article.

Anyway, thanks for the post. I may purchase the full article to peruse.
 
Top