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Can a Brachypelma Sp. fangs pierce a plastic coke bottle?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by atraxrobustus, Sep 29, 2019.

  1. atraxrobustus

    atraxrobustus Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
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    Can a Brachypelma Sp. (such as B. Smithi or B. Hamorii) fangs pierce a plastic coke bottle? I'm wondering if I can use a one or a two liter soda bottle to construct a cupping implement for regular handling purposes, such as cleaning the terrarium, etc. I can't seem to find any reliable information as to how sturdy and robust their fangs are.
     
  2. chanda

    chanda Arachnoprince Active Member

    It should be fine. The plastic in a 2-liter coke bottle feels like it's just as heavy as the plastic in the deli cups that I routinely use when I need to cup a spider for a rehouse or cage maintenance - and that the vendors use to transport and hold their spiders at the expos.

    Really, it's not so much a question of whether they could get their fangs through the plastic, but the angle. When they are inside a deli cup or bottle, it would be difficult for them to bite the curved surface - and they wouldn't really have a reason to. On the other hand, if you were to go poking at one with a piece of plastic from a 2-liter bottle, it probably could pierce that - and might damage its fangs in the process.
     
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  3. atraxrobustus

    atraxrobustus Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    Thanks for the information there. I haven't worked with Brachys before, as I went all in the hobby and got a bird eater as my first, and a cobalt blue as my second. The OBT was my third- and had to get rid of her due to the high strung tension, which really just wasn't for me. (call it being ultra-paranoid but with that kind of venom the remote possibility of a bite and the acid trip that comes with it just wasn't worth having the species to me). The reason I asked about this is that the boyfriend wants a B. Smithi, and is relying on me to show him the ropes on how to deal with her.
     
  4. Generally, handling should be kept to a minimum, and done with caution. I can see you understand that, but this is a disclaimer for anyone seeing this. If you plan to make a coke bottle into a catch cup, I would suggest watching a rehousing video on Tom Moran's channel on youtube, as he has an innovative design that allows the user to both coax the spider out of said catch cup using a brush from holes drilled in different sides of the cup, as well as a cardboard flat attatched to the surrounding mouth of the cup in order to prevent escape. Also, you may be referring to Brachypelma hamorii, unless you are certain you're specifically searching for a B. smithi.
    Also, I'm curious about your experience with the P. murinus, and how it compares to your C. lividus, because in my experience, they're basically both terribly skittish and terribly venomous.
     
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  5. atraxrobustus

    atraxrobustus Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    The listing we were looking at from the suplier stated that B. smithi and B. hamorii were synonomous species as of 2017 (which of course is bunk) so its really no telling. What I found with my C. lividus is that, while she is quick to move, she isn't super agressive really unless she is disturbed. (she hates being cupped, but she will feed off the tongs without being too much of a problem other than trying to bolt. I've yet to see her teleport, but its only a matter of time, as she is quite fast indeed.) The P. murinus was a total nutcase that struck several times at just about everything that got dropped in the terrium, including inanimate objects. (what happened to a banana, not to mention her favorite pastime of striking at the water bowl apparently for giggles was enough to say that it just wasn't for me.) It was also constantly trying to bolt on me at the slightest possible occasion. In terms of aggression and behavior (though by no means venom) I would say the difference between P. murnis and A. robustus, is that at least A. robustus can be contained. (noting that A. robustus can't climb smooth surfaces due to lacking tibial spurs).
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2019
  6. ThatsUnpossible

    ThatsUnpossible Arachnosquire

    UK
    I was just watching that Tom Moran video the other day, with the catch cup made out of a bottle. The bit about the bottle is near the end (about 25 or 26 minutes iirc) but the whole video is good.

     
  7. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnoreaper Arachnosupporter

    I use a large plastic bottle as a catch cup for larger specimens and I've not had any issues.

    Ask for pics focusing on the tibia and carapace, you can't use the carapace to tell them apart but it'll get you a good look at the trochanter which can be used to tell them apart (pretty much solid orange is hamorii whereas orange separated by a clear black strip is smithi), the hairs on the tibia will be off-white in hamorii and orange in smithi.

    hamorii vs smithi.jpg
     
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  8. Vanessa

    Vanessa Grammostola Groupie Arachnosupporter

    I have no doubt that their fangs could pierce that plastic, but they would have to be able to hit the plastic directly on with the tips... which might prove difficult with curved fangs.
     
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  9. atraxrobustus

    atraxrobustus Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    Gotcha. Given that, it was definitely B. hamorii that was pictured in the ad, though they are selling it under the name B. hamorii/B. smithi - therefore there's no telling what I'm liable to receive in the mail, if in fact the seller thinks that two are synonymous. The real question is whether or not there is any reason we definitely want a B. smithi as opposed to B. hamorii given his first (other than perhaps aesthetic factors) . I've heard that B. hamorii is a wee bit more aggressive and has a bit more of a bite propensity.
     
  10. The Grym Reaper

    The Grym Reaper Arachnoreaper Arachnosupporter

    It'll be a hamorii then, they're not synonymous but the labelling is technically correct (in it's own ham-fisted way) in that what used to be sold as B. smithi is actually B. hamorii (and what used to be sold as B. annitha is now B. smithi).
     
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  11. atraxrobustus

    atraxrobustus Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    Thanks for clearing up the confusion there.
     
  12. atraxrobustus

    atraxrobustus Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    Its really just wondering whether or not one has to be particularly conscious about where their hands are on the bottle itself in terms of the remote theoretical bite potential if the spider decides to have an aversion to being temporarily rehoused. I can see that for the beginner it's probably better to use a lightweight glass cup to further minimize the bite potential.
     
  13. Vanessa

    Vanessa Grammostola Groupie Arachnosupporter

    I wouldn't be too worried about it. They have to raise up their front end to really extend their fangs and the catch cup/bottle doesn't allow them to do that. I think it's the least of your worries during a rehouse.
     
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