C. marshalli double check

Sana

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,143
I had a strange experience last night. For some reason I have it stuck in my head that C. marshalli get into the 5" neighborhood. As I was doing maintenance last night I found one of my marshalli out of it's hide and it didn't look right. Behold when I open the enclosure he didn't move. A closer look had me surprised to discover emboli and tibial spurs. He molted a week ago and was barely 3" so to say I'm surprised is an understatement. I wasn't expecting a MM at all let alone one that died a week post molt. Do males marshalli generally mature at that size?
 

SC Tarantulas

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2011
Messages
218
I find that many baboon species have relatively small males. Of course they can vary greatly in size from one specimen to another but they are generally smaller in my experience. As far as the male only living for a week post ultimate molt is not normal.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
I have seen some very small MMs for the Ceratogyrus genus. I knew that most didn't last long after reaching maturity, but hell one week is pretty bad.

Sorry to hear about your loss :(
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,923
I had a strange experience last night. For some reason I have it stuck in my head that C. marshalli get into the 5" neighborhood. As I was doing maintenance last night I found one of my marshalli out of it's hide and it didn't look right. Behold when I open the enclosure he didn't move. A closer look had me surprised to discover emboli and tibial spurs. He molted a week ago and was barely 3" so to say I'm surprised is an understatement. I wasn't expecting a MM at all let alone one that died a week post molt. Do males marshalli generally mature at that size?
That's actually a good sized mm
 

Sana

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,143
That's actually a good sized mm
That's good to know. Lesson definitely learned. It sucks that he was a week post molt but at least he wasn't a year post molt and I hadn't noticed that he was mature. Now I'm going to have to get a good look at the other one that's about the same size and make sure I don't need to be looking for a girlfriend. It was premolt last week and still in the depths of it's burrow last night with no molt in sight.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
Baboon MM's are the shortest lived of the Theraphosidae in my experience. My shortest was a P. murinus that lasted a whole week and a half. My longest is a C. marshalli that is currently 6 months in... and he looks rough. I expect him to die any day now. Not sure why, but their shelf life is on par with milk.
 

Sana

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,143
Baboon MM's are the shortest lived of the Theraphosidae in my experience. My shortest was a P. murinus that lasted a whole week and a half. My longest is a C. marshalli that is currently 6 months in... and he looks rough. I expect him to die any day now. Not sure why, but their shelf life is on par with milk.
This was my first MM out of my "baboons" so that's good to know. I'm going to see about getting a closer look at all of my species that would fall into that category. Of course they would have to be my little pet holes so they are going to be a little more interesting to look closely at. For reference is that size MM the average (or larger then average) for A. ezendami and H. maculata as well? Those are the other two seriously pet hole species that I've got right now.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
Joined
Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
This was my first MM out of my "baboons" so that's good to know. I'm going to see about getting a closer look at all of my species that would fall into that category. Of course they would have to be my little pet holes so they are going to be a little more interesting to look closely at. For reference is that size MM the average (or larger then average) for A. ezendami and H. maculata as well? Those are the other two seriously pet hole species that I've got right now.
I actually don't have experience with A. ezendami at all, and all of my H. mac's are either female or young juvies. I'd still expect them to mature small and life a short life, though. Hopefully someone with more experience in those species can chime in.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
Marshalli is the largest Ceratogyrus; females get 6" and chunky. I've only seen one MM, and he was between 4 and 5" and wiry.
 

Sana

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,143
Marshalli is the largest Ceratogyrus; females get 6" and chunky. I've only seen one MM, and he was between 4 and 5" and wiry.
That was more the size I was expecting. This little guy wasn't a fraction above 3" but he had emboli and tibial spurs. He had molted every 4 months like clockwork for the last year so I didn't figure he was that close to mature.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,923
I raised several marshalli MMs that were 2.75-3"...they were ones bred by poec54:)

I've had ezendami mature as small as 1.75", and seem them as large as 3.5", which was the size of the one I recently paired with my female.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
I raised several marshalli MMs that were 2.75-3"...they were ones bred by poec54:)

I've had ezendami mature as small as 1.75", and seem them as large as 3.5", which was the size of the one I recently paired with my female.

The ezendami males I've had the last several years have all been 4+", and fast.
 

Formerphobe

Arachnoking
Joined
Feb 27, 2011
Messages
2,342
I've had baboon males mature at sizes all over the map.
P murinus- one at 5 inches (lived for 18 months post maturation), another was 6 inches.
A enzendami - 4 inches
C darlingi - 2.5 inches
C marshalli - sac mates, one at 3 inches, the other almost 4 inches.
P muticus - 5 inches, lived for 10 months then got eaten.
E olivacea - sac mates- one at 4.5 inches and got eaten about 3 months later. The other 5 inches and lived for 11 months before dying of old age.
H maculata - at least 5 inches. I sent him to Poec, he may remember how long that one survived.

There's no rhyme nor reason as to maturation size or life expectancy afterward. Longevity is frequently dictated by the females...
 

Sana

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,143
@Poec54 @cold blood Are you guys saying that the species is fast or that the males are faster? I've already discovered that the species as a whole are ridiculously quick. When folks say that OWs are fast you don't really fully understand the statement until you work with the first few. I have a whole new definition of speed from working with OWs.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
@Poec54 @cold blood Are you guys saying that the species is fast or that the males are faster? I've already discovered that the species as a whole are ridiculously quick. When folks say that OWs are fast you don't really fully understand the statement until you work with the first few. I have a whole new definition of speed from working with OWs.

AF ezendami aren't prone to the mad high-speed dashes as some OW's are, but the MM's are quick; out of the cage and across the floor if I'm not careful.

The speed and unpredictability of OW's is a carefully evolved defense against predators. To instantly go in a defensive pose, or sit motionless and then explode and run at high speed has saved many tarantula's lives. Same with the stronger venoms. Many NW's don't need this formula, as kicking urticating hairs is a better defense. They basically toss projectiles and often don't need to make contact with intruders. It's like the difference between a firearm and a hand-to-hand fight: much safer to keep your opponent at a distance.
 

Sana

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,143
AF ezendami aren't prone to the mad high-speed dashes as some OW's are, but the MM's are quick; out of the cage and across the floor if I'm not careful.

The speed and unpredictability of OW's is a carefully evolved defense against predators. To instantly go in a defensive pose, or sit motionless and then explode and run at high speed has saved many tarantula's lives. Same with the stronger venoms. Many NW's don't need this formula, as kicking urticating hairs is a better defense. They basically toss projectiles and often don't need to make contact with intruders. It's like the difference between a firearm and a hand-to-hand fight: much safer to keep your opponent at a distance.
I must say I have a strong admiration for an OWs ability to suddenly be somewhere else. If they run off on you I can't wait to see what happens the first time I try to move a MM.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,923
@Poec54 @cold blood Are you guys saying that the species is fast or that the males are faster? I've already discovered that the species as a whole are ridiculously quick. When folks say that OWs are fast you don't really fully understand the statement until you work with the first few. I have a whole new definition of speed from working with OWs.
They are fast, males and females, however it seems like MM's exhibit this speed more frequently.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
I must say I have a strong admiration for an OWs ability to suddenly be somewhere else.

Confuse your enemy, run and hide, and if that doesn't work, bite the crap out of them. It works.
 
Top