C. darlingi question

Stella Maris

Arachnoknight
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I received a 1.5 inch DLS C. darlingi sling recently and I'm wondering if there is a recommended setup for a sling of that size? The reason why I'm asking is that he is in a 16 oz deli container but opening the top of the lid destroys part of his webbing...since some of his webbing is connected to the top of his lid.

Should I just not bother to rehouse him right now since he appears to be settled into his present enclosure? He has multiple burrows and lots of webbing as expected already, and I'm not sure it would do him good to rehouse him at the moment.

Also, for watering this species does the same rule of using a bottle cap with water apply for drinking and humidity?
 

user 666

Arachnobaron
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Yes, a bottle cap is sufficient.

I gave my darling T artificial plants to attach its web tunnels to. As a result the webbing never touched the lid of the enclosure (a HL softball display box).
 

Stella Maris

Arachnoknight
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I actually bought a tiny critter keeper for him, will give that a try with a mix of fake plants and/or other anchor points. I really love the heavy burrowing and webbing this species does. Can't wait to see what he does in the coming days.
 

viper69

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does the same rule of using a bottle cap with water apply
Yes

For 1.5" OW species, 16 oz is OK, I tend to put them in something larger at times. I usually put them in a Really Useful Box. Gives more depth and space.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Personally being you I wouldn't rehouse him/her now. I would wait a couple of molt then put him/her in the final enclosure. Amazing genus, incredibly easy to care for.

Lots of inches of dry substrate and a piece of cork bark makes every (genus) Ceratogyrus happy :-s
 

Stella Maris

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Personally being you I wouldn't rehouse him/her now. I would wait a couple of molt then put him/her in the final enclosure. Amazing genus, incredibly easy to care for.

Lots of inches of dry substrate and a piece of cork bark makes every (genus) Ceratogyrus happy :-s
I was thinking the same thing, that I should just wait for rehousing. My only concern is that I don't want to be rehousing an OW a lot but his enclosure is already full of burrows and webbing.

I'm still trying to figure out what kind of substrate he is on.
 

cold blood

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Personally being you I wouldn't rehouse him/her now. I would wait a couple of molt then put him/her in the final enclosure. Amazing genus, incredibly easy to care for.

Lots of inches of dry substrate and a piece of cork bark makes every (genus) Ceratogyrus happy :-s
+1 I keep mine in deli cups till about 3", I would keep it there for a few molts as well. In fact, my darlingi are that size or bigger and are all in deli cups still (aside from the adult obviously).

There is no moisture or humidity requirements...in fact, they require it to be dry. Water dished get filled and webbed quickly...I am not quick to replace the dishes and leave them without for periods of time, but I do try to keep water dishes available...just don't get all worried when it becomes difficult. You don't just want to keep replacing dumped dishes as it will effect your substrate, which is why I give them a few days or even weeks to completely dry.

Also, theyre not all that difficult to re-house IME....and don't worry about webbing, they've got nothing better to do and a virtually unlimited supply of webbing. I tend to sweep an area with the back of the tweezers before I drop in food so I am not pushing it to a clear area through a bunch of web.
 

Chris LXXIX

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I was thinking the same thing, that I should just wait for rehousing. My only concern is that I don't want to be rehousing an OW a lot but his enclosure is already full of burrows and webbing.

I'm still trying to figure out what kind of substrate he is on.
I know what you mean if your concern is about the temperament/attitude. But good news, they aren't so bad at all, especially if compared to other OW's and certain "flash" speed NW (like genus Tapinauchenius).

If you, like me, think that when it comes to hardcore burrowers, the sooner in the final enclosure, the better, damn right.

Post a pic if you can, btw, so we can help trying to I.D that substrate :-s
 

Red Eunice

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This AF was rehoused on 4/12, 24 hours later, silking her cork hide. She walked right onto the salad spoon, by far the easiest rehousing I've done. If the new enclosure is large enough, simple place the old one inside and let them leave it on their own, usually happens at night. Ceratogyrus, mine, are often seen on the surface. Disturb the enclosure, "zip" down the burrow they go. MF C. darlingi.jpg
IMO, C. marschalli are the heaviest webbers and dig multiple burrow openings to boot.
For Ceratogyrus species, offer deep and dry substrate (I use topsoil), a water dish and a hide. Some will poke a starter hole only to find them burrow elsewhere, I let mine decide.
In most cases, Ceratogyrus are good OW species to start with. Who doesn't want a tarantula w/h a horn? S. hoffmanni is the only NW w/h a horn, and a monotype, for those concerned about venom potency. ;)
 

Red Eunice

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The sub looks like sphagnum moss, the ground up type. I see it used quite often by vendors at shows.
 

Sana

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Looks like peat to me. On the suggestion of a more experienced keeper of starting keeping some of my burrowers on peat. It makes the enclosures a little lighter when you have to move them and the ones that have peat seem to do just as well as the ones that have topsoil. I'm thinking that this is going to be a permanent switch where my burrowers are concerned.
 

Stella Maris

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What are the disadvantages of using peat? Or is it just a matter of preference among owners? I use cocoa fiber for all my tarantulas. I'm assuming when the time comes to rehouse Darling substrate change shouldn't be an issue?
 

Chris LXXIX

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What are the disadvantages of using peat? Or is it just a matter of preference among owners? I use cocoa fiber for all my tarantulas. I'm assuming when the time comes to rehouse Darling substrate change shouldn't be an issue?
Seems peat as well for me, I agree with sana.

There isn't IMO 'cons' of every sort when coco fiber, topsoil, or Irish moss peat (I personally love that for Scolopendridae) are concerned. Substrate was, is, and will remain 'tomorrow' one of the never ending subject of debates of this hobby.

IMO a matter of preference, at the end.

When the re-house time will come, you wouldn't have problems. The important thing is (especially for juve/adults) dry substrate. They are a kind of Theraphosidae that adapt pretty quick to the new 'house'.

Helps IMO also, if you, in the new set up, puts some of the previous web/piece of cork bark.
 

Red Eunice

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Plain topsoil.jpg
Good old topsoil, taranulas have used it as burrows for millions of years.
Sphagnum moss.jpg
Sphagnum moss, commercially packaged, 2 cubic feet for $4.89. Same volume of "peat" is twice the cost. Moisten this and it looks just like whats in your deli cup. Lighter than topsoil, but makes a "suitable" sub for fossorial species.
Coco fiber.jpg
Coco fiber, least suitable sub, IMO, to use for a fossorial species. Although they will adapt to it, they web profusely to reinforce the burrow. Coco is lightest of all and barely more expensive than sphagnum moss. At least in my area. ;)
Use whatever sub you want to provide, they WILL adapt. "Let your conscious be your guide."
With proper enclosure placement you shouldn't need to move them about.
 

cold blood

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Peat is noticeably lighter than coco fiber.

The disadvantages of peat are that 1. its very dusty, to the point that persons with allergies or athsma can be effected. Its also hydrophobic when dry, and can take a long time to absorb water....but when it finally does, it holds moisture like nothing else.

As said, subs are personal preference and any good sub is suitable for any t.
 
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Chris LXXIX

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The disadvantages of peat are that 1. its very dusty, to the point that persons with allergies or athsma can be effected. Its also hydrophobic when dry, and can take a long time to absorb water....but when it finally does, it holds moisture like nothing else.
I've never noticed that... I use Irish moss peat and doesn't seems dusty at all. The one I use hold moisture pretty well (I use that for my S.subspinipes).
 

ccTroi

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That's plenty of space for the little booger. I have GBB slings that are 2", and I intend to keep them in there for another molt. Just be gentle when taking the lid off, and eventually you'll get used to the process and hopefully the booger will, too (I HOPE!). Good luck! :)
 

jigslovesyou

Arachnopeon
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May 13, 2020
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Anyone know what is wrong with this darlingi? He stays on the lid for 2 days now. He just finished his meal last 3days ago. 20200522_172951.jpg
 
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