Breeding Rosies...

kellygirl

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get ready for a bombardment of questions...

i believe i have a female g. rosea as she does not have any hooks on her legs. Is there any other way to make sure? What are the best ways to tell male Ts from female Ts?

i have recently gotten into this whole T scene (as many of you know) and have quickly become...um...slightly addicted. this week i received a shipment of 14 1" curlies (the guy i bought them from sent me 4 extras). the price was such that i couldnt turn them down. i ordered 10 for $2 apiece, including shipping, and then i got the extras. they all arrived happy and healthy. most of them have built burrows and eaten 1 or 2 crickets. a few of them are climbers. anyways...i'm getting off topic! sorry! i'm just really excited to be a new mommy! so yes, the 14 Ts make my collection a whopping 19. considering that before august of this year i only have my rosie, that's a lot.

so yes, i am learning a lot here. is it too soon for me to attempt breeding of my rosie? i know they have a reputation for being difficult to breed but there are many local pet stores from which i can obtain rosies. is it worth a few bucks to give it a try? if/when i attempt it, how would i go about doing so? what kind of environment do they need? how much space? how long should they be left together? what kind of temp? etc...

also, i how do i know if my rosie is ready to breed? i have had her a little over a year and she has only molted twice since i've had her. she only recently started eating again after a 6 month fast. i would guess she is about 4" at this point. how can i tell if she is a mature female?

what do you guys think about me being such a newbie trying this? is it too soon? i would just hate for my girl to go her whole life without getting any. :}

kellygirl
 

Botar

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In a rosie, the tibial spurs and the "boxing gloves" on the ends of the pedipalps will be obvious when it is a male. You can determine sex by the exuvium after a molt. Do a search on the T forum and you'll find some pics I posted of a male T. blondi's exuvium and a female's exuvium was posted earlier by someone else a while back. The pics make sexing fairly obvious. If you can't find the pics I'm talking about, e-mail me and I'll send them to you as I downloaded the female exuvium picture earlier and can send it to you as a comparison.

As for all the other stuff... I'm pretty much new at it too, so I will defer to the more experienced keepers.

Botar
 

Al Muoio

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Yes I know the feeling of being addictive. I also keep some Jumping spiders. My Rosie likes to stay in her burrow. She is about 3.5 inches. Hope you enjoy your new arrivals.
Blessings, Al
 

kellygirl

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one more question...

i have those 14 curlies from the same eggsac... when they mature, would it be bad to mate them? i dont know how that interbreeding works in the T world...

kellygirl
 

Botar

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Originally posted by kellygirl
one more question...

i have those 14 curlies from the same eggsac... when they mature, would it be bad to mate them? i dont know how that interbreeding works in the T world...

kellygirl
Funny you should mention that. I just talked to my brother about that very thing on the phone last night. He has his doctorate from Stanford in microbiology and has done a great deal of work in genetics. He said that any organism which reproduces by sexual means (I'm putting this in English... he speaks science) CAN have harmful effects from inbreeding. That is how most of the color morphs in the herp world are obtained. The conversation with him was long and interesting, but basically he said that it was POSSIBLY harmful.

Along those lines, is anyone familiar with albinism in Tarantulas?

Botar

Edit: If they are from the same eggsac, I would think that due to the differences in maturation rate, you probably wouldn't be able to inbreed them anyway. Any comments from the more experienced?
 
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MrDeranged

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@ Kelly,

I'm sure inbreeding from the same sac has been done but I wouldn't suggest it. It also isn't that easy to breed siblings. As Botar said, the maturation times generally don't allow it without interference. By interference, I mean when the keeper powerfeeds the female to get it to mature quicker and keeps the male cool, to slow down the maturation rate. It is actually much more common to mate a son to a mother although this also isn't really the best idea, unless no other viable breeding partner can be found. You'll see this done occaisionally with the less common species in the trade.

@ Botar,

By definition, there can be no such thing as an albino T. T's do not have pigment in their exoskeleton, therefore, there cannot be an absence of pigment, which is the definition of albinoism. Kind of a cop out answer (no pun intended) but it's the same one that I've heard others given.... ;)

Scott
 

Botar

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Thanks MrD

Cop-out or not, it's the answer for which I was looking.

Botar
 

Phillip

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good one...

Cop out... heh heh good one there Scott. You're killin me.
Phil
 

Martin H.

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Hello Scott,

Originally posted by mrderanged

@ Botar,

By definition, there can be no such thing as an albino T. T's do not have pigment in their exoskeleton, therefore, there cannot be an absence of pigment, which is the definition of albinoism. Kind of a cop out answer (no pun intended) but it's the same one that I've heard others given.... ;)
if not albino, then what to call these very interesting coloured Cyriopagopus schioedtei nymphs? Photo by Siegfried Huber: >>click here<<
Both nymphs on this photo are from the same eggsack. And here is an article about these strange coloured Cyriopagopus schioedtei slings:
  • VON WIRTH, V. (2003): Ungewöhnliche Farbabweichung bei Nymphen von Cyriopagopus schioedtei (Thorell, 1891). DeArGe Mitteilungen 8(5): 30-31.
all the best,
Martin

www.dearge.de
www.spiderpix.com
 

sunnymarcie

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if not albino, then what to call these very interesting coloured Cyriopagopus schioedtei nymphs?~Martin

:? cute,fuzzy, WHITE?;P j/k

Great picture by the way:)
 

rosehaired1979

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On your experience on the breeding Kelly lke ppl say you have to start some where. I think you will do fine :)
 

danielr6543

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I have heard that interbreeding isnt bad at all. Seeing as how in the wild probably half of the breedings that occur happen from spiders from the same sac. Just something i heard im sure its better to have more bloodlines for spiders, but i woulndt think it would harm anything.
 

kellygirl

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Originally posted by rosehaired1979
On your experience on the breeding Kelly lke ppl say you have to start some where. I think you will do fine :)
I actually posted this thread over a year ago. =D

-Kelly
 

Nixy

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Originally posted by Martin H.
Hello Scott,

if not albino, then what to call these very interesting coloured Cyriopagopus schioedtei nymphs?.

Did the color difference remain though?
Thats a question I ask myself often, though true there is no pigmentation in their exoskeletons. There is definatly "hair color" So how often is it possable that this kind of blanching occuring?
Would the critter be all white or would the markings be blanched within their color ranges?
 
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