Breeding G. pulchripies

Gods Spartan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
47
So, I believe I finally have a breeding pair. Joe, my first T. molted out last night and he has his hooks! Now, apparently...

1) He doesn't have long for this earth so I need to make a choice.

I can keep him in his cage and never let him do what he wants or I can chance breeding him.

2) I could hand him off to some breeders in exchange for some of his lineage.

3)Try my first breeding attempt with my first T.

One final question that determines #3.

4) How forgiving are female pulchripies? I am not sure I want to chance my first T falling victim to negligence on my part.

5) Any tips are appreciated if I go it on my own?
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,618
I don't think they are all that difficult to breed, but there's always a chance that the female may try to kill the male. You need to be ready to play referee if she turns hostile, you can separate them with tongs or even a wooden spoon can do the trick.
 

Gods Spartan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
47
I don't think they are all that difficult to breed, but there's always a chance that the female may try to kill the male. You need to be ready to play referee if she turns hostile, you can separate them with tongs or even a wooden spoon can do the trick.

How likely is this genus to turn hostile? If well fed that is?
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,618
How likely is this genus to turn hostile? If well fed that is?
Just as likely as any, it also has to do with how you introduce the male. You don't want to introduce the male on the same side as the female, let him make his way to her on his own, observe their interactions, most importantly don't rush it, you don't want to try prodding the male towards the female, patience is key.

As we covered previously, make sure your female is well fed and has recently molted, other then that watch closely and be ready to intervene if things go south.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,371
How forgiving are female pulchripies? I am not sure I want to chance my first T falling victim to negligence on my part.
I had the male, a friend did the breeding moak;)

But breeding is pretty straight forward. It would be an excellent species to use as a first breeding option.

As mentioned, you want to fatten the female a bit first (the male should also be well fed) and wait for the male to make a sperm web...evidence will look like a thick line of webbing, like this...
Then just slowly introduce the male to the females enclosure and let them do the work. Just stand guard with something you can use to break them up (you usually don't have to) just in case.

Any tips are appreciated if I go it on my own
There are basically 3 points where the MM is in the most danger.

1. Initial contact. If no one is tapping, or if she is posturing like she's hunting....she could be perceiving him as food...recognizing this is something that gets easier the more experience you have.

2. When he first goes in close and tries to lift her...if hooks aren't in place, or he does something wrong, or the female gets nervous, he could get fanged. Once he's in though, often its good until...

3. The pull out point. When a palp gets in there good and he tries to pull away to escape, it can briefly get stuck, hesitating him just a split second...this puts him at a disadvantage as this is when many females are most aggressive...but note that not all are...many seperations can be completely uneventful.

After a successful pairing, feed her up, keep her warm and in a month or three (when she starts looking really fat), dampen part of the sub. Make sure she has a dark place to hide in or under and generally keep her darker.

Males can live 2 years or more...so keep him healthy and safe and don't subject him to multiple pairings after you have seen an insertion. This way if she doesn't lay and molts, you still have that healthy male to try again...even if its a year later.
Good luck, they are great slings to raise and are always in demand.
 
Last edited:

Gods Spartan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
47
I had the male, a friend did the breeding moak;)

But breeding is pretty straight forward. It would be an excellent species to use as a first breeding option.

As mentioned, you want to fatten the female a bit first (the male should also be well fed) and wait for the male to make a sperm web...evidence will look like a thick line of webbing, like this...
Then just slowly introduce the male to the females enclosure and let them do the work. Just stand guard with something you can use to break them up (you usually don't have to) just in case.



There are basically 3 points where the MM is in the most danger.

1. Initial contact. If no one is tapping, or if she is posturing like she's hunting....she could be perceiving him as food...recognizing this is something that gets easier the more experience you have.

2. When he first goes in close and tries to lift her...if hooks aren't in place, or he does something wrong, or the female gets nervous, he could get fanged. Once he's in though, often its good until...

3. The pull out point. When a palp gets in there good and he tries to pull away to escape, it can briefly get stick, hesitating him just a split second...this puts him at a disadvantage as this is when many females are most aggressive...but note that not all are...many seperations can be completely uneventful.

After a successful pairing, feed her up, keep her warm and in a month or three (when she starts looking really fat), dampen part of the sub. Make sure she has a dark place to hide in or under and generally keep her darker.

Males can live 2 years or more...so keep him healthy and safe and don't subject him to multiple pairings after you have seen an insertion. This way if she doesn't lay and molts, you still have that healthy male to try again...even if its a year later.
Good luck, they are great slings to raise and are always in demand.
Thanks for the tips. Makes me feel much better!
 

aphono

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 11, 2017
Messages
481
Good luck, send updates please? This is a wonderful species.
 

Gods Spartan

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 15, 2014
Messages
47
Good luck, send updates please? This is a wonderful species.
Thanks! I'm waiting on a reply from a breeder to see if they have need for a breeding pair. Currently, the Mrs. and I are waiting on our first born! Not sure I have the resources to handle the many slings, or the time for that matter. From what I have heard...it's fairly cut and dry, but it's a lot of tediousness I may not have the time for.

I might just find a breeder and ask them to give me a few slings.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
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Mar 7, 2012
Messages
4,058
I might just find a breeder and ask them to give me a few slings.
The best thing to do if you don't want to breed him yourself (and deal with all of those slings) is to sell or trade him to a breeder. "Breeding loans" (where no money changes hands, but you take some of the resulting slings) can be risky business unless you really know the person you're dealing with.

The "fresher" he is (the more recently he molted), the better.
 
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