Brachypelma albopilosum humidity

Craigwoody92

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
7
Hi guys I'm thinking of purchasing a curly hair I have a setup ready for it and was just wondering if anyone can point me in the direction of humidity levels? I've read numerous care sheets saying around 70-80% as they like it quite high...however I've also read that some people's love theirs dry and humidity quite low?? Just abit confused guys so anyone that's kept one of these could you give me any info? Would a spray on the substrate every day on one side be okay? Cheers.
Craig
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
I hate that 'humidity' evil presence that haunts since the dawn of mankind the Theraphosidae hobby, leading people to false roads with the help of his dastard son, the infamous 'online care sheet'. We need to banish those forever from our world.

With that said, if the B.albopilosum you want to buy is a juve/adult one, a water dish (always full) is enough for keep away those invisible evildoers presences :pompous:
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
Care sheets suck. I don't know why they keep popping up like a fungus.
With B.albopilosum there is no need for specific humidity. Like Chris said, keep a waterdish full, and that's it. Although mine like a bit of humidity when it is winter and the heating is on, so I overflow the waterdish a little once or twice a month. No spraying or misting necessary. A hide, dry substrate, and waterdish, some fake leaves, keep it on room temperature, and it will be happy :)
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
667
You didn't state what size you plan on getting.
Slings need a higher humidity % since they haven't developed the waxy cuticle to guard against dehydration. Slightly moistened sub and a water dish/cap should be available always.
Juveniles and adults, mostly dry, don't fret if you overflow the water dish. They won't require a specific humidity level at this stage of life. The water dish should be kept full and clean at all times. These are real "bulldozers" and put any and everything in their water source. IME
There ARE good care sheets on the "net", but rare to find them. Best, as you have, is to ask on the forum that has people with first-hand experience for answers.
Enjoy the B. albopilosum, they are a great T to care for.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,508
if anyone can point me in the direction of humidity levels? I've read numerous care sheets saying around 70-80%
Care sheets :banghead:KILL:banghead: tarantulas.

If you use care sheets, you will likely kill your T. I've never used a caresheet for a T. It's full of lethal, non-useful, and sometimes useful info, thus making them extremely dangerous to your pet!!

For humidity, you will go crazy if you try to dial in to humidity, and in doing so, two things will likely happen 1. You will be certified crazy 2. Your T will die because the container will be full of moist/stuffy stagnant air in all probability.

Do not worry about humidity except for the bit above mentioned about slings. Even then, you do not need a specific humidity value to have your pet thrive.

Learn from others here how much water to add to your substrate, what's considered too much, too little etc, not some magic value.
 

KezyGLA

Arachnoking
Joined
Apr 8, 2016
Messages
3,033
If a sling then slightly moist sub and small water dish. If adult then provide dry sub and a larger waterdish and overflow it and let the substrate dry out then repeat. Move the water dish to another spot in enclosure after drying out to prevent other things growing in your enclosure.
 

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,763
I'd keep it on slightly moist substrate it's whole life. The only ones I keep with dry substrate are terrestrials from semi-arid regions (Aphonopelma, east and south African baboons, etc), and Avics.
 

billrogers

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 18, 2016
Messages
216
My B. albo actually really dislikes moist sub. Last rehouse she spent a few days on the walls of her enclosure until the sub dried out some more. I always keep her on completely dry sub with a water dish on one side and she does fine.
 

Craigwoody92

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
7
Hi guys thankyou for all the advice it's really appreciated! She arrived today and I've put her in her enclosure...however she is upside down on the tank lid is this normal...she had a little wander on the sides earlier and now she's upside down on the roof! Her substrate is dry exo earth so it's not too humid as I thought of that at first. Any ideas?
 

DeanK

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 16, 2016
Messages
81
Take some pics of the enclosure just so we can see and make sure there's enough substrate in there. All Ts will climb so you gotta make sure there's not a big gap between the top and the floor that would cause damage should it fall off
 

Scolopendra1989

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 12, 2016
Messages
53
Hi guys I'm thinking of purchasing a curly hair I have a setup ready for it and was just wondering if anyone can point me in the direction of humidity levels? I've read numerous care sheets saying around 70-80% as they like it quite high...however I've also read that some people's love theirs dry and humidity quite low?? Just abit confused guys so anyone that's kept one of these could you give me any info? Would a spray on the substrate every day on one side be okay? Cheers.
Craig
You did the right thing not trusting online care sheets and coming to arachnoboards. Watch a husbandry video, compare information, and make a logical decision based on what you've learned. A good sized, but shallow, water dish is enough to keep the humidity up. I think you'll be fine with a well-ventilated enclosure and the aforementioned water dish. Good luck!
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
It is normal for T's to wander around the enclosure when they're new. Just exploring their surroundings. Yes, tarantula can walk/stand upside down.
Pics of the setup will help :)
 

MaryRose

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
7
You didn't state what size you plan on getting.
Slings need a higher humidity % since they haven't developed the waxy cuticle to guard against dehydration. Slightly moistened sub and a water dish/cap should be available always.
Juveniles and adults, mostly dry, don't fret if you overflow the water dish. They won't require a specific humidity level at this stage of life. The water dish should be kept full and clean at all times. These are real "bulldozers" and put any and everything in their water source. IME
There ARE good care sheets on the "net", but rare to find them. Best, as you have, is to ask on the forum that has people with first-hand experience for answers.
Enjoy the B. albopilosum, they are a great T to care for.
Hi!
What is the difference between a sling and juvenile?
 

MaryRose

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
7
sling is just short for spiderling...aka, baby.....so slings are smaller and younger and generally lack and adult coloration.
So,
sling is just short for spiderling...aka, baby.....so slings are smaller and younger and generally lack and adult coloration.
Thanks!
Then there isn't a specific distinction; like one year old or has had three molts?
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
Joined
Mar 2, 2014
Messages
667
Hi!
What is the difference between a sling and juvenile?
For me size and humidity levels.
I, personally, break a Ts size in thirds.
Sling (spiderling) 1st instar til 1/3 DLS of an average adults size.
Juveniles from 1/3 to 2/3 DLS of adult size.
Adults fall in the last 1/3.
So, a 6" adult is a sling til it reaches 2" DLS, 2"-4" its a juvenile, 4"-5" some refer to as sub-adults and 5"-6" an adult. Just my way others may size theirs differently, there's no hard fast rule on it to my knowledge.
Irregardless, all my slings are kept with lightly moist substrate and a water cap to drink from if desired. Fossorial, terrestrial and arboreal both NW and OW slings. Once juveniles they're rehoused and kept as close to their native environment as I can provide.
 

MaryRose

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
7
For me size and humidity levels.
I, personally, break a Ts size in thirds.
Sling (spiderling) 1st instar til 1/3 DLS of an average adults size.
Juveniles from 1/3 to 2/3 DLS of adult size.
Adults fall in the last 1/3.
So, a 6" adult is a sling til it reaches 2" DLS, 2"-4" its a juvenile, 4"-5" some refer to as sub-adults and 5"-6" an adult. Just my way others may size theirs differently, there's no hard fast rule on it to my knowledge.
Irregardless, all my slings are kept with lightly moist substrate and a water cap to drink from if desired. Fossorial, terrestrial and arboreal both NW and OW slings. Once juveniles they're rehoused and kept as close to their native environment as I can provide.
Thanks! Those are great guidelines.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
11,863
Its al completely subjective though, I call them slings until I see adult colors, at which point for me, they are juvies. When the t is large enough that I think its close to mature, I call them sub-adults. Once I'm sure they are mature, I call them adults.

This personal variance is why you should really focus on the DLS, or Diagonal Leg Span, it tells people a lot more. Save the monikers for idle chit chat:)
 
Top