Brachycibe and other andrognathid food fungus

Ponerinecat

Arachnoknight
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Been keeping 2 local species of this genus, and 2 altitude based variants of one of them. The millipedes themselves are extraordinarily easy to maintain but I've been having problems sustainably feeding them. Recently small patches of food fungus popped up in their container right after redoing it. Anyone with experience know how to culture the fungus? I've been having to scrounge for dried shelf and bracket fungi which the millipedes will eat but not especially enthusiastically, so an easy long term solution would be appreciated.
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spasskgirl

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Upping the thread. I am also looking for more ideas what to feed them and where to get it.
 

Ponerinecat

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They're still suffering die off's and food is even more unstable, but I did find a thin reddish fungus growing on the underside of a branch they seem to like.
 

Arthroverts

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Have you tried sterilizing new wood and leaves before adding it to the enclosure? This often causes outbreaks of mold which are bothersome for keepers of round millipedes and polydesmids, but might be nutritious for your platydesmids here.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Ponerinecat

Arachnoknight
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I don't sterilize anything for my enclosures, ha ha. Lots of people arent okay with that but eh, it works so far.
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoking
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Neither do I, at least not in the traditional sense of utilizing an oven/microwave. Regardless, sterilizing wood/leaves would allow for the spores of new fungi to rapidly grow on the "blank sheet" (similar to what you do with your springtails; at least, I think that was you), and that might be the fungi they seem to appreciate. You said yourself that the new enclosure grew mold, which is often the case with new setups where the microhabitat hasn't stabilized so to speak.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Ponerinecat

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Neither do I, at least not in the traditional sense of utilizing an oven/microwave. Regardless, sterilizing wood/leaves would allow for the spores of new fungi to rapidly grow on the "blank sheet" (similar to what you do with your springtails; at least, I think that was you), and that might be the fungi they seem to appreciate. You said yourself that the new enclosure grew mold, which is often the case with new setups where the microhabitat hasn't stabilized so to speak.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
Ah, I see. I can definitely give that a try, thanks for the advice.
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoking
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Yeah no problem

Let me know if you ever decide to sell some off by the way ;)...

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Ponerinecat

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Yeah no problem

Let me know if you ever decide to sell some off by the way ;)...

Thanks,

Arthroverts
I'll definitely notify you when the local populations are reinvigorated by rain. Would you be interested in Octoglena anura, too? I've never had success with them but I could include a few of those if you want to try them out.
 

Ponerinecat

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Trying to grow the fungus independently with pine needles as a substrate and oats as a food. It's already sprouted into the puffy white fuzz I see the millipedes snacking on, hope this works.
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Arthroverts

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I'll definitely notify you when the local populations are reinvigorated by rain. Would you be interested in Octoglena anura, too? I've never had success with them but I could include a few of those if you want to try them out.
Sounds good.
Hmm. Might be worth taking a stab at them, your lack of success though has me wary. Any ideas what went wrong with trying to culture them?

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Ponerinecat

Arachnoknight
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Sounds good.
Hmm. Might be worth taking a stab at them, your lack of success though has me wary. Any ideas what went wrong with trying to culture them?

Thanks,

Arthroverts
By not having success I meant never getting them to breed. Keeping them alive doesn't seem especially difficult, I was able to keep a group of juveniles and a single adult alive for 2-3 months together with my Brachycibe before that container got overtaken by mold. I'd assume that if I had been able to control the mold the juveniles would have grown up with minimal casualties and been able to breed. The main problem with Octoglena is that I'm not sure what exactly they eat. I've seen people find them on the underside of mushrooms, so they probably nibble on the gills like a lot of other inverts, but personally I only ever see them on fallen pine logs. Not sure if they feed on fungus like Brachycibe, the wood itself, a mix of both, or something else like algae or lichen.
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoking
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Ah I see. It would definitely be worth experimenting with them further then.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Ponerinecat

Arachnoknight
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Project appears to be a success! I placed some chipped wood in and now most of it is covered in the fungus.

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XxSpiderQueenxX

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i used to have a colony of these, and actually bred them somehow (the parent was curled around the eggs until they hatched, so cute) but they all eventually died because at the time i didnt know they ate fungus. the breeder who i purchased them from said they ate rotten wood soo i presume thats why they all died...
 

Ponerinecat

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i used to have a colony of these, and actually bred them somehow (the parent was curled around the eggs until they hatched, so cute) but they all eventually died because at the time i didnt know they ate fungus. the breeder who i purchased them from said they ate rotten wood soo i presume thats why they all died...
Oddly enough I don't see too many big cultures of these guys. They don't seem all that difficult and are actually the only millipede I've ever bred.
 

Ponerinecat

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Bottom layer of fungus melted from mold and bacterial film, lost a few millis as well. Cleaned it out and reintroduced the surviving fungus and millipedes, as well as some Sinella curviseta to control bacterial films. Feel like the hardest part about this fungus is keeping the competition at bay. :confused:
 

Madnesssr

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I collect polypore for my Brachycybe Lecontii from fallen limbs and my wood pile. If you struggle to find what you need, hit me up. I am happy to share. I find that if I keep the extra in a ziplock bags and occasionally spritz it, it will grow and spread some.
 

Ponerinecat

Arachnoknight
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I collect polypore for my Brachycybe Lecontii from fallen limbs and my wood pile. If you struggle to find what you need, hit me up. I am happy to share. I find that if I keep the extra in a ziplock bags and occasionally spritz it, it will grow and spread some.
Thats good to know. I have a few patches of polypore under my usual springtail spots, so I can harvest from there. Thanks for the offer.
 
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