Blaptica Dubia in Canadian climate?

musihuto

Arachnodemon
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Sep 21, 2006
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Hi,

I was wondering if there were any (professional) entomologists out there that would be willing to write a very brief testimony stating that an equatorial roach species such as blaptica dubia has a zero percent probability of establishing itself as an invasive species in the Canadian climate?

thanks! :D
- munis
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
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Not a professional entomologist...just a student, but B. dubia would not be able to become an invasive species because Canadian winters are very harsh. These roaches can't even manage to infest a bedroom that is kept at 70* year round, much less a country that freezes over once a year.

If you're going to try to persuade your government, I wish you luck but also realize that governments aren't easily swayed.
 

Crono

Arachnobaron
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You are not likely to find an entomologist willing to do this for you, and if you did it would be very unlikely the government would even consider unsolicited testimony, espeically with the current political climate in this area.

Most entomologists I know are busy dealing with conservation, cataloguing native species or working to bring pest species under control. Adding a new species to the mix is a risk many wouldn't take, given the effects other species have had.

If there is even a hint that the government is willing to loosen the regulations, I would bet that the forestry, agricultural and environmental lobbies would be against it.
Who would win- Multibillion dollar industrial sectors and environmentalists together, or a couple of hundred weirdos who keep bugs in their basements?
 

musihuto

Arachnodemon
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touché Crono, touché...

though my goal is to negotiate the release of one specific shipment from detention, i realize the fact that this would set a precedent which might open floodgates the government wants to keep shut!

anyways, what i was looking for really was a short: "blaptica dubia stop reproducing at so and so humidity/so and so temperature, and die at x hum./x temp." cite some references/research. sign the bottom, and list credentials/degrees... so really, like max 30 minutes of work for anyone in the profession! ;)

cheers! :D
- munis

You are not likely to find an entomologist willing to do this for you, and if you did it would be very unlikely the government would even consider unsolicited testimony, espeically with the current political climate in this area.

Most entomologists I know are busy dealing with conservation, cataloguing native species or working to bring pest species under control. Adding a new species to the mix is a risk many wouldn't take, given the effects other species have had.

If there is even a hint that the government is willing to loosen the regulations, I would bet that the forestry, agricultural and environmental lobbies would be against it.
Who would win- Multibillion dollar industrial sectors and environmentalists together, or a couple of hundred weirdos who keep bugs in their basements?
 

Crono

Arachnobaron
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Not trying to be a jerk, I would love to be able to keep many things I can't at the moment. :) Even though I do not fully agree with the blanket ban on exotic insects in Canada, I do see its purpose and the difficulties that would be involved in lifting it.

It is not going to be possible to get the government to reconsider their position on needing a permit for most species of insects without a compelling reason or lots of support, and using feeder roaches in place of crickets, or because the insects look pretty is not going to provide either.

Exotics may seem harmless, but all it would take is someone to ask the question "What happened to all the Elm and Ash trees?" to make the government think twice about changing anything.
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
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It's not that they're unwilling, just slow.

Recently, the USDA de-regulated hissing cockroaches (according to the head of the ISU bug zoo). It would be a joke to enforce any sort of ban now.

Different country, though. Can't speak for Canada. I'm just now starting to learn about the USDA regulations...hopefully next school year I'll be able to bring some new info on regulations to the table for hobbiests.

But...that's a work in progress. Maybe I'll share more at arachnocon?
 

Drachenjager

Arachnoemperor
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It's not that they're unwilling, just slow.

Recently, the USDA de-regulated hissing cockroaches (according to the head of the ISU bug zoo). It would be a joke to enforce any sort of ban now.

Different country, though. Can't speak for Canada. I'm just now starting to learn about the USDA regulations...hopefully next school year I'll be able to bring some new info on regulations to the table for hobbiests.

But...that's a work in progress. Maybe I'll share more at arachnocon?
lol like the ban worked anyway. The problem is a few idiots that release thier exotics when they get tired of them. I would love for all the imported critters that exscaped or were released into the wild would drop dead. I love them , but they do not belong in the wild to where they are not native. Also i dont see why you cant collec brachypelma in places they are not natives. IE Florida B. vagans populations, could be eradicated with out chemical use just by telling me i can go and catch ane keep all i want. lol
 

TNeal

Arachnoknight
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What kind of idiot would ship them from the US to Canada? I only ship pet food from the US to Canada. {D

Tom
 

musihuto

Arachnodemon
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Sep 21, 2006
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Drachenjager:
That's basically my point... in canada, any b. dubia that happened to get loose *would* drop dead by mid-november! :p

TNeal: good one! ;)

cheers! :D
- munis
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
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lol like the ban worked anyway. The problem is a few idiots that release thier exotics when they get tired of them. I would love for all the imported critters that exscaped or were released into the wild would drop dead. I love them , but they do not belong in the wild to where they are not native. Also i dont see why you cant collec brachypelma in places they are not natives. IE Florida B. vagans populations, could be eradicated with out chemical use just by telling me i can go and catch ane keep all i want. lol
Yeah, I know what you're talking about. IIRC, they accidentally flooded some endangered wolf spider burrows with gasoline in the crossfire.

Yeah, the idiots give us a bad name. Although I did have a lobster roach escape out my front door today, so this makes me a bit hypocritical.

It escaped down a crack where I stabbed it to death with a twig, but I couldn't reach it. I didn't see it expell an eggcase so I assume it was male.
 

Drachenjager

Arachnoemperor
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Yeah, I know what you're talking about. IIRC, they accidentally flooded some endangered wolf spider burrows with gasoline in the crossfire.

Yeah, the idiots give us a bad name. Although I did have a lobster roach escape out my front door today, so this makes me a bit hypocritical.

It escaped down a crack where I stabbed it to death with a twig, but I couldn't reach it. I didn't see it expell an eggcase so I assume it was male.
well accidents happen, i am more ticked at the ones that have critters( herps, mammals, bugs) and get tired of them and let them go outside. I mean WHY do we need large constrictors such as burmese pythons wild in the everglades? And as much as i love Tarantulas , I dont think Florida is the place for B. vagans wild pops lol
oh well
ohh and i also would rather not be fishing and catch an Oscar lol
but it happens lol
 
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