big is better

tony77tony77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 28, 2006
Messages
292
Hi guys, I'm looking for a big size arboreal T 8"+ but not sure what to get. Anything beside Pokies, alreay got to many of them. I'm looking into the Haplopelma schmidti. Anyone got any suggestions? thanks!!!
 

Hedorah99

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
1,870
Hi guys, I'm looking for a big size arboreal T 8"+ but not sure what to get. Anything beside Pokies, alreay got to many of them. I'm looking into the Haplopelma schmidti. Anyone got any suggestions? thanks!!!
H. schmidti is not arboreal. ;)
 

P. Novak

ArachnoGod
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Sep 12, 2005
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6,234
Haplopelma schmidti isnt arboreal though. Or is it, I'm pretty sure it isn't.

I don't think there is anything arboreal that exceeds 8" besides maybe a C. sp. "blue".
 

harrypei

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 30, 2006
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289
C.sp."blue" is not really an arboreal...they are built like one but for all the one's I had they live on the ground.
 

Johnny_27

Arachnoknight
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Aug 1, 2006
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257
The only 2 i know off the top of my head is Singapore blue and p. rufilata
 

phormingochilus

Arachnoangel
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Aug 18, 2003
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791
All Cyriopagopus species are arboreal. Period. Whatever behaviour we can observe in captivity is an artifact of captivity. I have collected Cyriopagopus in the wild (C. schioedtei, C. sp. "Singapore Blue" and C. sp. "Gandalf's bridge") in both Malaysia and Borneo and they have all been very much arboreal with adult specimens living at average 3-5 meters high in tree holes and slings and juvies from eye level and upwards. It's the same as saying that Poecilotheria and Psalmopoeus are burrowers because they sometime dig into the substrate in captivity. That certainly isn't so in nature I can confirm to you all. So to repeat: Whatever behaviour we can observe in captivity is an artifact of captivity!

The Cyriopagopus are on the other hands very large and colourful arboreals if you wish for large species. C. sp. "Singapore blue" are reaching legspans in the range of 25 cm., C. schioedtei max out at 22 cm., C. sp. "Gandal's Bridge" (aka. C. sp. "Sarawak" and Cyriopagopus sp.3 at Rick West's site) reach roughly 22 cm. and C. sp. "Borneo Black" (very new species in the hobby - reached the trade last year) is so far recorded up to 20 cm. with potential to reach larger max. size. So all in all large critters that live in trees - arboreally ;-)

Regards
Søren

C.sp."blue" is not really an arboreal...they are built like one but for all the one's I had they live on the ground.
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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Feb 13, 2006
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8,662
I see what you are getting at, but I have owned a few WC females and they had a very nice setup giving them every chance to be up and in the trees so to speak and they all have chosen to be down in the dirt. Even captive bred slings that I have raised to adults have stayed down low.........

You know how whales fins droop when they are captured from the wild? I guess this could maybe be something similar to that, but do you think it would affect genetic imprinting? Imprinting that tells them how to behave and eat and breed? I am thinking outloud ill shut up now..... its 730 am and Im at work lol I have to keep myself amused somehow.
 

Midnightrdr456

Arachnoprince
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Jan 17, 2006
Messages
1,088
ive seen Cyriopagopus species that do both, dig or go up into the cork bark in the tank. But usually they are considered arboreal. Ive seen more arboreal ones than I have seen purely digging ones.

Im hoping my little sling goes arboreal (second only to hoping its a female!!)
 

Mina

Arachnoking
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Joined
Oct 4, 2005
Messages
2,136
C.sp."blue" is not really an arboreal...they are built like one but for all the one's I had they live on the ground.
No, but they are somewhat semi arboreal, I thought that would do, plus they are really pretty!!!!! :D
 
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