Best way to rehouse OW's?

Matttoadman

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Last night I rehoused my Cyriopagopus sp. "minax" females to 5.5 gallon aquariums. It probably went fairly well for my first adult rehouse considering they both are in their new homes and unharmed. I had to use a plastic ladle to slowly remove coco fiber. The had been placed in gallon containers for temp housing 2 weeks ago so the fiber was loose and not webbed up. The sub just fell in on them. Any safer ways to do this? One ran up the ladle and out to the floor of course. The other just wanted to kill the ladle.
 

TownesVanZandt

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Last night I rehoused my Cyriopagopus sp. "minax" females to 5.5 gallon aquariums. It probably went fairly well for my first adult rehouse considering they both are in their new homes and unharmed. I had to use a plastic ladle to slowly remove coco fiber. The had been placed in gallon containers for temp housing 2 weeks ago so the fiber was loose and not webbed up. The sub just fell in on them. Any safer ways to do this? One ran up the ladle and out to the floor of course. The other just wanted to kill the ladle.
I´m not sure what a ladle is, but I usually overflow the burrows of Asian terrestrials with water (always have a catch cup ready). The African terrestrials I just dig out.
 

Matttoadman

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Hopefully with 7 inches of substrate in a 16in x 8 inch x 11 inch tank rehouse won't need to be done anytime soon.
 

TownesVanZandt

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Well, if you´re not comfortable rehousing them this way, you might try the "water method" I was talking about. Whether it is safer or not is probably more a matter of preference. It´s certainly more messy as the substrate will be really wet when you´re done, but I use it with Asian species as they often run about when spooked. African terrestrials will be more likely to stand their ground in a threat pose.
 

viper69

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Well, if you´re not comfortable rehousing them this way, you might try the "water method" I was talking about. Whether it is safer or not is probably more a matter of preference. It´s certainly more messy as the substrate will be really wet when you´re done, but I use it with Asian species as they often run about when spooked. African terrestrials will be more likely to stand their ground in a threat pose.
I saw the water method on YouTube once and had to watch it. It's definitely a treat to see them come out. Though not for the owner, as the subject of the vid I saw came out pretty ticked of course hah.
 

TownesVanZandt

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I saw the water method on YouTube once and had to watch it. It's definitely a treat to see them come out. Though not for the owner, as the subject of the vid I saw came out pretty ticked of course hah.
They are always grumpy when they come out, but out they come ;) That´s why it´s really important to have a catch cup at hand! In the best case scenario (this depends on where the entrance of the burrow is located in the enclosure), they might actually run straight into it.
 

viper69

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They are always grumpy when they come out, but out they come ;) That´s why it´s really important to have a catch cup at hand! In the best case scenario (this depends on where the entrance of the burrow is located in the enclosure), they might actually run straight into it.
I agree. I've never seen such grumpier Ts than those hah. This guy who did the filming didn't have a catch cup :watchingyou:, but he did pour in pretty slowly. I saw another the OW Asian ran right up the guy's vacuum cleaner and sat on top for a bit. The owner lost control of his OW Asian hah, it's a funny video, he thought it was going to turn out different for some reason.
 

KezyGLA

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Africans will tend to stand for a bite but Asians will usually bolt and bite. They so spicy. I use the grass technique and keep drwing them right out with the blade of grass. Then when they are out I place a 2L soda bottle with the end cut off (basically a catch cup) which they will usually bolt upwards inside the bottle to the cap end. Then I place cardboard over bottom to preven an escape. Then place bottom of the catchy bottle in new enclosure over a pre made burrow(if terrestrial/fossorial) or cork tube(for arboreals). Then I slowly unscrew the cap and place soft paintbrush in and carefully nudge the T until it bolts back down the bottle into the new hide. I works problem free for me so far.
 

Matttoadman

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That sounds cool. I guess you could place a deli cup over their hole, with a hole drilled in it, stick the grass blade through both hole and tickle away.
 

14pokies

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I do it very similarly to KezyGLA most of the time..
If the burrow is wide enough and they are close to the opening of the burrow I will use a straw with a bendable neck to go over the top of the T and touch its back legs.. They usually come screaming out of the burrow so have a catch cup in the other hand..
Down side to this method is that sometimes the burrow is wide enough for them to turn completly around and they shoot to the bottom of the enclosure.. Usually works great though..
 

viper69

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That sounds cool. I guess you could place a deli cup over their hole, with a hole drilled in it, stick the grass blade through both hole and tickle away.
Let me know if that works. I haven't tried that yet, but always wondered if that would work. I don't see why it wouldn't.
 

KezyGLA

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I think getting them out from the burrow first then trapping them is key. I think if you hover over burrow they can just shoot back in to burroe if spooked
 

Ellenantula

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Always looking for good rehousing ideas. Gotta C fimbri outgrowing juvie enclosure. So many tunnels, so many pop-up openings from tunnels. I am considering a deluge and then catch-cupping when he/she runs out.
There's just no room to work in a juvie box (ala Jamie's-type).
 

Haksilence

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When rehousing or upgrading my old world burrowers I dig them out, I'll locate where they are and dig on the opposite side and move across the enclosure inch by inch until I break into the burrow, then I'll either coax them out with tongs or sometimes I'll use a chop stick through the sub on the opposite side to nudge them out.
I use the water method for mature males if I'm getting them out for breeding, so as to not disturb their enclosure too much.

I don't prefer the water method for rehousing because it doesn't ALWAYS work. I've had some that have just sat there practically underwater, and now, since they didn't want to come out, you have to dig them out of mud instead of regular substrate.

For Africans forget about it. They don't budge from their burrows, you'll have to physically dig them out
 

Bread

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I had to improvise for my Hysterocrates, i tried water but she doesn't care and sits submerged (she often swims in her in-enclosure pond)
In the end I put the two enclosures together, and used string with a locust on the end, (literal spider fishing), she grabbed on and didn't let go while I lifted her across.
It was a sight, this also worked for my obt and cancerides, they are never more than 4" off the deck so I figured it was okay :)
 

Andrea82

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I had to improvise for my Hysterocrates, i tried water but she doesn't care and sits submerged (she often swims in her in-enclosure pond)
In the end I put the two enclosures together, and used string with a locust on the end, (literal spider fishing), she grabbed on and didn't let go while I lifted her across.
It was a sight, this also worked for my obt and cancerides, they are never more than 4" off the deck so I figured it was okay :)
I laughed while reading this, i could almost see the scene in my head.
You: okay, here comes the water, bet you won't like that and come out.
Spider: (while lazily looking at you and drifting on his back) Nah man, I'm good! Got some more?
:rofl:
 

gypsy cola

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rehoused several T's over the weekend. My OBT was the easiest. A tap on the glass and she bolted into her tube web. Picked up the tube web and placed in the new enclosure. That was it. Rehousing my rose hair was the hardest.


3 things you need:
•A few catch cups within reaching distance
•A large pair tongues
•A good workspace. A place with enough space so if a T bolts, you will know exactly where it ran off too.
 
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