Best starting T?

Kat Maehl

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
19
I'm sure it's all subjective, and having three different species of T's is hardly a beginners life I'm still wondering.

Long story short, I will likely have to release my T's eventually. We're selling our farm and depending on the political atmosphere in the USA might be moving there.

Anyways. So if I do, I'm not likely to be able to take my T's with me, so I'll have to buy (most likely scenario) or beg for a couple slings. (Yes, beg as in "does anyone have a couple slings they could throw at me!")

In the US I won't have the availability to just walk outside and trip over a t in the middle of a trail. No sir. It will be breeders for me. I am some what contemptuous of having to let my T's go. Granted it's not for a couple months and I'll have time to figure crap out but still... they're my babies...

So the question is. For someone starting the right way, with no T's which are the cheapest, easiest to care for species.

Of course a lot of it comes down to personal preference, but I'd like to know what you all think will be a good starting one.

I do prefer ones that get big, and colorful ones. Like my Costa Rican suntiger. But she's a dwarf... I digress.

So send in suggestions!
And if anyone has any slings they don't know what to do with, keep me in mind!
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
I'm sure it's all subjective, and having three different species of T's is hardly a beginners life I'm still wondering.

Long story short, I will likely have to release my T's eventually. We're selling our farm and depending on the political atmosphere in the USA might be moving there.

Anyways. So if I do, I'm not likely to be able to take my T's with me, so I'll have to buy (most likely scenario) or beg for a couple slings. (Yes, beg as in "does anyone have a couple slings they could throw at me!")

In the US I won't have the availability to just walk outside and trip over a t in the middle of a trail. No sir. It will be breeders for me. I am some what contemptuous of having to let my T's go. Granted it's not for a couple months and I'll have time to figure crap out but still... they're my babies...

So the question is. For someone starting the right way, with no T's which are the cheapest, easiest to care for species.

Of course a lot of it comes down to personal preference, but I'd like to know what you all think will be a good starting one.

I do prefer ones that get big, and colorful ones. Like my Costa Rican suntiger. But she's a dwarf... I digress.

So send in suggestions!
And if anyone has any slings they don't know what to do with, keep me in mind!
Well, technically, in certain states/area of the U.S you can find T's as well in the wild, and not necessarily always in the "protected, no hands, areas" :-s

As far as the "best beginner T's" it's always the same music :) pretty covered well in one of EulersK (Eric Bana sort of) videos.


Buy a female 'GBB' I say... sizes aren't that bad, I mean, nothing transcendental but not little like the "Dwarf" ones.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
A sad thing I would experience being in your place would be this: people spend a little fortune for Megaphobema mesomelas, I live in Costa Rica but damn... had to move soon.

Please note that I'm not implying stuff like "being you I would WC one" eh eh... :troll: just a personal consideration, uhm :angelic:
 

Jason B

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
88
Buying a GBB is always a good call. And in certain areas of the US we have Ts..I think the rule is west of the Mississippi(the river) with the exception of florida which I've heard has both B. Vagans and Avic Avic have established themselves there.
 

GreyPsyche

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
Messages
92
There is TONS of great beginners species but I always recommend the GBB as it's one of my favorites I'm the hobby, it's pretty much everything a beginner could ask for.
 

Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
190
I'm sure it's all subjective, and having three different species of T's is hardly a beginners life I'm still wondering.

Long story short, I will likely have to release my T's eventually. We're selling our farm and depending on the political atmosphere in the USA might be moving there.

Anyways. So if I do, I'm not likely to be able to take my T's with me, so I'll have to buy (most likely scenario) or beg for a couple slings. (Yes, beg as in "does anyone have a couple slings they could throw at me!")

In the US I won't have the availability to just walk outside and trip over a t in the middle of a trail. No sir. It will be breeders for me. I am some what contemptuous of having to let my T's go. Granted it's not for a couple months and I'll have time to figure crap out but still... they're my babies...

So the question is. For someone starting the right way, with no T's which are the cheapest, easiest to care for species.

Of course a lot of it comes down to personal preference, but I'd like to know what you all think will be a good starting one.

I do prefer ones that get big, and colorful ones. Like my Costa Rican suntiger. But she's a dwarf... I digress.

So send in suggestions!
And if anyone has any slings they don't know what to do with, keep me in mind!
Best and cheapest here in the US (usually):

B. Albopilosum *Curly hair tarantula*

A. Chalcodes *arizona/mexican blonde tarantula*

Lasiodora Parahybana *LP/Salmon Pink Bird eater*

Brachylpelma Vagans *Mexican Red Rump*

Grammastola Rosea *Rose hair*

Bigger and Cheaper (usually):

LP-Lasiodora parahybana *salmon pink bird eater*

A. Geniculata *brazillian White knee/Giant White knee* - these guys can be a bit testy attitude wise, not for a true "beginner" but you've stated you have some prior experience, so you could do with a A. Genic fairly well I'm sure. they are a pretty great species IME.

Grammastola Pulchripes *Chaco Golden Knee* - very large size, but very gentle and calm species.


these are just a few i would suggest. most are fairly easy to raise and are pretty harder species and usually relatively cheap here in the states. there are SOo many more i could list too, but these are the ones that really always stood out to me in the begging and ones i have personal experiences with.


* i included the usual common names because here in the states, A LOT of pet shops and such don't like to use the scientific names, which is unfortunate, but if you go with the breeder option, they will more then likely use the scientific names, as they should*
 

Kat Maehl

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 18, 2017
Messages
19
Best and cheapest here in the US (usually):

B. Albopilosum *Curly hair tarantula*

A. Chalcodes *arizona/mexican blonde tarantula*

Lasiodora Parahybana *LP/Salmon Pink Bird eater*

Brachylpelma Vagans *Mexican Red Rump*

Grammastola Rosea *Rose hair*

Bigger and Cheaper (usually):

LP-Lasiodora parahybana *salmon pink bird eater*

A. Geniculata *brazillian White knee/Giant White knee* - these guys can be a bit testy attitude wise, not for a true "beginner" but you've stated you have some prior experience, so you could do with a A. Genic fairly well I'm sure. they are a pretty great species IME.

Grammastola Pulchripes *Chaco Golden Knee* - very large size, but very gentle and calm species.


these are just a few i would suggest. most are fairly easy to raise and are pretty harder species and usually relatively cheap here in the states. there are SOo many more i could list too, but these are the ones that really always stood out to me in the begging and ones i have personal experiences with.


* i included the usual common names because here in the states, A LOT of pet shops and such don't like to use the scientific names, which is unfortunate, but if you go with the breeder option, they will more then likely use the scientific names, as they should*
Thank you for adding the common names. I'm still learning them, so it's super helpful! Your suggestions are great. Most of those are ones I'd like to own too!
The one I really want is the C. Fasciatum. Even though they're endemic here, I'd want a little piece of home if we end up selling our farm.
 

Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
190
Thank you for adding the common names. I'm still learning them, so it's super helpful! Your suggestions are great. Most of those are ones I'd like to own too!
The one I really want is the C. Fasciatum. Even though they're endemic here, I'd want a little piece of home if we end up selling our farm.
your welcome!
normally i would not add them, and i highly suggest straying away from them, but the reason i do is a lot of american reptile/pet shops seem to ONLY deal in common names. so knowing literally ALL the scientific names sometimes doesn't get you anywhere if the store you go to is completely ignorant on the animal. though still makes it easier to look for a matching specimen knowing the scientific that *usually* goes with the common name.

i went to a shop recently with Only common names written on their T's. literally had to educate the kid working there on what a "Ven Sun" was (P. Irminia AKA the venezualian sun tiger haha)
ended up buying a "asian Fawn" and a "Chestnut baboon" (Chilobrachys huahini and Heterothele villosella)

the worst part was, he was going to sell the Huahini to a family and their 16 year old, who only had a Rose hair currently, because he said they must be a calm species with the name like that, and was rattling off that tarantulas are not dangerous and that a bite would be just like a Bee sting and that they are easy to handle.
i literally had to cut in and explain that this species was NOT handleable for them, that it WOULD do damage with any type of bite, and that it is a OW and thus very fast/ skittish/ defensive and difficult to handle tarantula. basicly told them that this guy compared to the Rose is like the difference between a ball python and a pit viper/cobra for the most part. sometimes it really just makes me wonder how they do it. but thats besides the point and I'm diverging here.
 
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