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Best conditions to keep a poecilotheria regalis?

Discussion in 'Tarantula Questions & Discussions' started by ShaunMot, Nov 17, 2016.

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  1. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnolord Active Member

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    Outside temperatures drop to less than 5 degrees Celsius in winter and over 45 degrees Celsius in summer, stays warmer/cooler than outside (ranged from 15-35 degrees C inside) and I've never had to heat/cool any of the inverts
     

  2. Yes, sadly enough I did. That was before becoming fully aware of their shortcuts. Fortunately, the scorplings were sold off except for one or two kept by employees. The scorplings themselves were kept on the proper substrate and fed correctly.

    Had I been more informed, I would've used the classifieds to sell them individually. Still, had they remained communal, the risk of cannibalism would've only increased so there wasn't any perfect answer. Those who did buy scorplings or get a free one in exchange for buying a proper enclosure have a captive bred disease free critter that will live a long time.

    If you mail them out, they can get lost or injured that way either one at a time or all at once. They could also just be used as food for something else without myself being told about it. There are no perfect answers in an imperfect world.

    When I purchased the Versicolor from Rick's, my original plan was to get a feeder roaches for the scorpion I already had. Upon arriving, he informed me that another collector had donated his entire collection because he could no longer keep them. I heard a rumour later that the guy went to jail and the girlfriend couldn't handle it but can't confirm that.
    Of course, I paid t to much, got a crappy caresheet or two and had a crappy mantis cage that had less potential then I thought.

    Somehow, Charlotte pulled through and now she is doing great. C versicolor Charlotte 1-25-18 1.jpg


    If you cranked up the power all the way, yes they'd be dangerous. The voltage is so limited that the components are warm to the touch.

    Yes, it should be cosmetically improved, but if you can grasp and hold tightly any heating components, they pose zero hazards at distance. In fact, my tactical flashlight gets hotter at the highest setting.

    The principal is to heat an area not just an enclosure. Taken individually, none of these would have much of an effect. It's the lack of a single point of origin that makes it work. The metallic wire shelves further de-localize any singular point of origin.

    Yes, conversation to a cabinet would no doubt improve the engineering but 2 or 3 thermostats wired in series might be a worthwhile precaution in such an event. This prevents any single point of failure.

    A possible drawback would be a reduction of ventilation as well as the additional cost.

    All wiring from the sockets is contractor grade, same stuff you use for portable welders or Hilti tools etc.

    I can take my lawn chair lay out and watch tarantulas just like a warm summer day!!


    If it won't burn your skin, it won't burn cardboard. The bulb itself can be changed by hand as well. Remember, there is a voltage controller.

    If someone broke in and removed the limiters and plugged then back into the wall--big trouble. That's unlikely in a gated community.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 18, 2018
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  3. beaker41

    beaker41 Arachnoknight

    I don’t have any statistics on house fires but my adult pokies seemed to enjoy a much greater temperature drop overnight. Once I started dropping then down 15-20 degrees or so they started coming out to hunt much more often at night. 80 during the day and down to 65 at night seemed to please them more than 80 and humid 24/7.
     
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  4. I've noticed the same thing. If a cricket is in there for more then 12 hours and I turn it off for 8, it'll be gone by the time I turn it back on.

    The day/night cycle might be worth incorporation but that involves adding a timer. Typically it doesn't matter but once in a while if my pokie starts fasting, that'll snap get out of it.

    I really need to rebuild that system and add times etc and then network it online. Best of all, when I do that, I'll be able to remotely watch all my spiders even from my phone.!!

    For now, manual control is fine. I doubt the spider cares.
     
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  5. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor

    Fasting? For what? Two days? Didn't you get it like two months ago? I don't think you could get consistent, accurate results in that time. Not to mention with 1 test subject.
     
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  6. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnolord Active Member

    And if it shorts out and sparks fly from the light? Is that not a fire hazard?
     
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  7. Usually it's gone in about 2 to 4 hours and never ignored. She never water in front of me. Cycling it triggers her off to systematically criss cross the entire enclosure. I suspect that's where the activity occurs, but she's a sneaky little thing.

    A short out would merely trip the breaker. With such reduced voltage, it's unlikely the wiring would wear out. It isn't in motion or vibrated.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 18, 2018
  8. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnolord Active Member

    Keyword: unlikely
    It's also unlikely that a lot of things would happen but they do, I would still take precautions instead of "it probably won't happen so I'll ignore it". That's why people get life insurance incase they have an unexpected car crash or something, it's unlikely but it happens
     
  9. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    oh, like a space heater
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018
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  10. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor

    This guy's made a 30 min rant aboit space heaters on his YouTube if anyone's curious..:bored::hilarious:
     
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  11. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    I bet its hilarious.
     
  12. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor

    It's definitely something else.. don't think he realizes that not all people use them incorrectly.. recommends some 430$ heating thing, etc. Couldn't finish it.
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
  13. Andrea82

    Andrea82 Arachnoking Active Member

    Got a link?
     
  14. Venom1080

    Venom1080 Arachnoemperor

    Go to the videos he shared, hover cursor over video, click on title, will bring you to YouTube, click on his channel (white light), it's the most recent he uploaded.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  15. MetalMan2004

    MetalMan2004 Arachnolord

    Oh man... if you have time watch the whole thing. I left it on in the background and it gets more “interesting” as you go.
     
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  16. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Malleus Aranearum Staff Member

     
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  17. cold blood

    cold blood Moderator Staff Member

    I love how he says the additional $50-100 per month a space heater will cost to run will break the bank....dude, if that amount is the bank breaker, the bank was already broke. I don't use my window air conditioner any more...it costs 4-5 times what my space heater does to run. $50 for the space heater is a drop in the bucket by comparison.

    Here's the window units he wasn't us to spend $500 on because they are perfectly safe..

    "Air conditioners cause an average of 20 deaths, 140 injuries, and $82 million in property damage annually, according to a 2016 report by the National Fire Protection Association."

    http://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/exp...-turn-air-conditioners-fire/story?id=48176911

    "In 2010, air conditioning, fans or related equipment were involved in an estimated 7,400 reported U.S. home structure fires, with associated losses of 29 civilian deaths, 249 civilian injuries and $207 million in direct property damage. The number of these fires has varied up and down with no clear trend.

    In 2006-2010, the 7,200 reported home structure fires per year involving air conditioning, fans or related equipment included 2,500 per year involving central and room air conditioners specifically and 3,900 per year involving fans. Heat pumps accounted for 500 fires per year. Air conditioners and fans also accounted for nearly all the associated losses."

    https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Resea...volving-air-conditioning-or-related-equipment

    "Linked to a number of deaths, triple-figure injuries and hundreds of millions in property damage, fires caused by air conditioners (ACs) are more common than previously thought. In 2010 alone, roughly 7,400 fires were the result of the operation of faulty air conditioning systems."
    http://electronics360.globalspec.co...r-conditioner-is-actually-a-major-fire-hazard


    Now one of the most common causes for electrical fires statistically is actually the refrigerator. Yet not a soul bats an eye at their fridge running 24/7 till it dies.
    Should we all be irrationally concerned that our fridges remain plugged in? Should I make a video to warn everyone??
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...tion-toxic-gas-s-dangerous-appliance-all.html

    ----

    "According to the U.S. Fire Administration, in 2014, electrical fires accounted for 6.3 percent, nearly 24,000 fires, of all residential fires"

    Electrical fires are only the cause for 6.3% of fires in homes.....so almost 94% of fires are unrelated to anything electrical. I'm pretty comfortable running my oil filled space heater 24/ 8 months a year.
     
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  18. Ungoliant

    Ungoliant Malleus Aranearum Staff Member

    Oil-filled radiators are actually quite safe if used properly. I prefer those over smaller, cheaper space heaters that blow hot air.

    This house doesn't have central heating or insulation, so it does add a lot to the electric bill to run them a lot. We recently got a heat pump for days when it is cold enough to need heat but above 40 °F. Now we only run the space heaters when it gets too cold for the heat pump to work.

    A heat pump is a more substantial initial expense, but it is more energy-efficient over the long term, so for us, the cost was justified, considering that the majority of time we need heat in a South Carolina "winter" is above 40 °F.
     
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  19. miss moxie

    miss moxie Arachnoprince

     
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  20. Dennis Nedry

    Dennis Nedry Arachnolord Active Member

    This is one of my new favourite videos
     
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