Best Beginner Arboreal Snake?

Toxoderidae

Arachnoprince
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
1,010
I am looking to keep GTPs or GTBs eventually, but their requirements seem... a little much or someone with little to no experience with arboreal snakes. So, can I have any recommendations on what a good beginner arboreal would be, and can you give me some pointers?
 

Shawnee

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 14, 2015
Messages
85
I've only kept two arboreals (One is sometimes considered semi-arboreal) but I've kept two Green trees (Yapen and Manokwari locale) and a carpet python. (Caramel jaguar, not that it matters) The carpet was definitely easier as far as care, but I honestly don't find green trees that difficult. Their humidity needs are higher, and the majority of them do not tame down with handling like other snakes. I got lucky in that both of my green trees tolerated handling, but they are much more quicker to bite and/or become irritated than any other snake I've owned. If I had to go with a green tree or a carpet, I'd get a carpet 100% They grow to an impressive size, are handle able, garbage disposals with food, and the only thing you really gotta watch out for is they are more prone to RI, and they do need a pretty sizeable cage as an adult.
 

Nir Avraham

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 14, 2013
Messages
226
I have never kept any aboreal snakes, but from my experience I can tell you that Amazon tree boas and Carpet pythons (had a pair) could be good for you. And you can find cheap CB Amazon tree boas...
 

Hellblazer

Arachnosquire
Joined
May 13, 2016
Messages
135
I agree that Amazon tree boas would probably be a good place to start. Just keep in mind that they will be much more defensive than your ball python.
 
Last edited:

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
12,436
I agree that Amazon tree boas would probably be a good place to start. Just keep in mind that they will be much more defensive than your ball python.
Very, very true. I won't own an Amazon tree boa just based on disposition alone. If I'm going to get a snake w/such a disposition, I would get either a GTP, or an Amazon Basin Boa, a subset of the Emerald Tree Boa. I think the Basin's are the prettiest however.

If you want an arboreal with a better disposition get a Brazilian Rainbow Boa, the high red morphs can run between $1-5k, albino's run $30k. They do require that one pay attention to humidity, ie be dedicated, same with GTP and Amazon Basin Boas.
 

Shrike

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 8, 2006
Messages
1,598
I've never heard Brazilian rainbow boas described as arboreal before. I think they're a pretty far cry from your tree boas and pythons, which I think of as strict arboreals. They're awesome snakes though!

OP, if you're willing to consider other semi-arboreal species that won't set you back much, you might want to consider black rat snakes. I've seen them displayed in vertical enclosures and they readily take advantage of the extra height. They might not be eye candy like some of the other species mentioned here but they're extremely hardy.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
12,436
I've never heard Brazilian rainbow boas described as arboreal before. I think they're a pretty far cry from your tree boas and pythons, which I think of as strict arboreals. They're awesome snakes though!

OP, if you're willing to consider other semi-arboreal species that won't set you back much, you might want to consider black rat snakes. I've seen them displayed in vertical enclosures and they readily take advantage of the extra height. They might not be eye candy like some of the other species mentioned here but they're extremely hardy.
Actually, now that I think of it, they are semi-arboreal, sorry for the misinformation @Toxoderidae
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 3, 2016
Messages
124
I kept a Morelia viridis for 5 years, thing was nasty I only had 6 in tongs at the time, got nailed a few times and had to pick a few teeth out my skin with tweezers on one occasion, thing with them is the balance of humidity and temp, mine got infectious stomatitis after getting tagged by a feed, I was able to treat it since then, I dead fed and used tongs and a rubber maid lid as a shield.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,726
I'm completely clueless about :) but here in Italy the 'Elitists' (aka the average Italian snake keeper) doesn't suggest Morelia viridis as a first one.
 

Toxoderidae

Arachnoprince
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
1,010
an atb, theyre slow as hell though their strikes are comical lol
I wasn't looking from that standpoint. I was asking care wise, and the people above you that responded gave me great information. Not what you did, which was just say they strike a lot and it's funny but they are slow.
 

REEFSPIDER

Arachnobaron
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
412
Very, very true. I won't own an Amazon tree boa just based on disposition alone. If I'm going to get a snake w/such a disposition, I would get either a GTP, or an Amazon Basin Boa, a subset of the Emerald Tree Boa. I think the Basin's are the prettiest however.

If you want an arboreal with a better disposition get a Brazilian Rainbow Boa, the high red morphs can run between $1-5k, albino's run $30k. They do require that one pay attention to humidity, ie be dedicated, same with GTP and Amazon Basin Boas.
The "high white" Amazon basin boas are to die for on my list of must have animals. You have good taste.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
12,436
The "high white" Amazon basin boas are to die for on my list of must have animals. You have good taste.
Thank you. There's only 2 Amazon Basin breeders I would buy from because they specialize only in Amazon Basins, and that breeder is one of them. Like all designer morphs, they aren't for everyone. That breeder is one of the best. I will get one of those high white ones at some point.

Just like I'm getting a "Supersnowflake" White's Tree Frog from Sandfire Dragon Ranch at some point. I've always dreamed of a Supersnowflake, hoping someone would produce one. Sure enough Bob did. I asked him how long it took to produce-- THIRTY YEARS!!!

I've owned White's before and LOVE them.
 

JumpingSpiderLady

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Messages
342
OP, if you're willing to consider other semi-arboreal species that won't set you back much, you might want to consider black rat snakes. I've seen them displayed in vertical enclosures and they readily take advantage of the extra height. They might not be eye candy like some of the other species mentioned here but they're extremely hardy.
I've seen them climbing my house! Really cool snake imo, but I don't keep snakes.
 
Top