Beginner T owner help

Ehliza

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Nov 29, 2016
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Hi! I'm getting my very first T next week and it's gonna be a Pink Zebra Beauty spiderling. I've done research and planning for about a month in advance but still have a few questions. First, do you have any tips for raising up a spiderling? Also do any of you have your own PZB? If so, I'd like to hear your experience with them. Thanks in advance :)
 

Chris LXXIX

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I have no clue about what a 'PZB' is (I highly dislike common - for sale - names therefore I tend to not remember those aside for a couple of exceptions) but for sure, in my 25 years of T's keeping, I probably had as a well a little, hairy, lazy like hell, lovely 'PZB' somewhere.

After all, this is what every serious and devoted Theraphosidae scholar should ask to himself: how much lovely is my 'PZB' ??? :angelic:

--

The care is easy. Keep an eye on the substrate because slings are more delicate, therefore completely bone dry is a no. If there's space enough, add a little water dish... always of best :-s
 

Ehliza

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Nov 29, 2016
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I have no clue about what a 'PZB' is (I highly dislike common - for sale - names therefore I tend to not remember those aside for a couple of exceptions) but for sure, in my 25 years of T's keeping, I probably had as a well a little, hairy, lazy like hell, lovely 'PZB' somewhere.

After all, this is what every serious and devoted Theraphosidae scholar should ask to himself: how much lovely is my 'PZB' ??? :angelic:

--

The care is easy. Keep an eye on the substrate because slings are more delicate, therefore completely bone dry is a no. If there's space enough, add a little water dish... always of best :-s
My apologies PZB is an abbreviation for Pink Zebra Beauty or the actual name Eupalaestrus Campestratus I do believe
 

cold blood

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I would not start with a sling, especially not of such a slow growing species. That sling's gonna be a sling for a year or three.

If its a spiderling that you really desire, I would strongly suggest that you get a G. pulchripes instead. Theyre one of the very few beginner species that doesn't grow ridiculously slow. Aside from that, a pulchripes will also have a much better appetite and feeding response, as well as being a lot more active. Plus you get to see those golden knees come in at about 1.5".

If this E. camp is definitely the one you want, I would urge you to get a juvenile instead of a sling....or at least one over an inch. Small slings are often more of a source of concern than enjoyment for a lot of new keepers.
 

Trenor

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My apologies PZB is an abbreviation for Pink Zebra Beauty or the actual name Eupalaestrus Campestratus I do believe
It is. The Latin names are much easier for people to understand which T you are referring to.

I've not personally kept this species before but it looks like a burrower. I'd give it enough room with a decent amount of damp substrate to allow for digging. As Chris mentioned add a water dish if there is enough room.
 

Vanessa

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I have two Eupalaestrus campestratus - one is a moult confirmed female and the other is a suspected male. I bought them in mid April at about 3/4" and they are now both around the 2" mark... maybe even a bit bigger. I don't find them to be that slow growing at all and, from what I have read, they are considered more of a medium growth species. They are both larger than my Grammostola pulchra, that I got around the same time, and the G.pulchra started out larger.
I find that mine both burrow a lot and I rarely see them. I recently had to rehouse them and they both had burrowed down into tunnels within a couple of hours. They have never turned down a meal unless they are in premoult. Both of mine have proven to be very tolerant and have shown no signs of defensive behaviour. I have heard stories that people have had less tolerant individuals, but the majority are not defensive. I keep their substrate drier, now that they are not spiderlings, but I do overflow their water dish. I have found them submerged completely in the water dish with their carapace under water. I have never had anyone do that before.
I love my two very much. They are very hard to find in Canada and I grabbed up the last two that our biggest seller in Canada had. Nobody has had them since. I only ordered one, but bought the other when I picked them up at an expo. They were more costly than many other spiderlings - double what you would pay for most beginner species and the same price as the G.pulchra.
I believe that they become much more visible as they get larger. I hope so, because they are really gorgeous and I miss seeing them. Now I only see them through the enclosure walls down in their tunnels.
Here are my two, Calypso and Graffiti.
_DSC1743-2.jpg
_DSC1025-2.jpg
 

Ehliza

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Nov 29, 2016
Messages
29
I would not start with a sling, especially not of such a slow growing species. That sling's gonna be a sling for a year or three.

If its a spiderling that you really desire, I would strongly suggest that you get a G. pulchripes instead. Theyre one of the very few beginner species that doesn't grow ridiculously slow. Aside from that, a pulchripes will also have a much better appetite and feeding response, as well as being a lot more active. Plus you get to see those golden knees come in at about 1.5".

If this E. camp is definitely the one you want, I would urge you to get a juvenile instead of a sling....or at least one over an inch. Small slings are often more of a source of concern than enjoyment for a lot of new keepers.
Thank you for this I had no idea they grew so slowly. I found a sling for the same price and since their care is pretty much the same I'm switching to it :) The only thing I worry about with slings is getting a male and not keeping it long but I also want to watch it grow. Kind of a dilemma
 

Ehliza

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Messages
29
I have two Eupalaestrus campestratus - one is a moult confirmed female and the other is a suspected male. I bought them in mid April at about 3/4" and they are now both around the 2" mark... maybe even a bit bigger. I don't find them to be that slow growing at all and, from what I have read, they are considered more of a medium growth species. They are both larger than my Grammostola pulchra, that I got around the same time, and the G.pulchra started out larger.
I find that mine both burrow a lot and I rarely see them. I recently had to rehouse them and they both had burrowed down into tunnels within a couple of hours. They have never turned down a meal unless they are in premoult. Both of mine have proven to be very tolerant and have shown no signs of defensive behaviour. I have heard stories that people have had less tolerant individuals, but the majority are not defensive. I keep their substrate drier, now that they are not spiderlings, but I do overflow their water dish. I have found them submerged completely in the water dish with their carapace under water. I have never had anyone do that before.
I love my two very much. They are very hard to find in Canada and I grabbed up the last two that our biggest seller in Canada had. Nobody has had them since. I only ordered one, but bought the other when I picked them up at an expo. They were more costly than many other spiderlings - double what you would pay for most beginner species and the same price as the G.pulchra.
I believe that they become much more visible as they get larger. I hope so, because they are really gorgeous and I miss seeing them. Now I only see them through the enclosure walls down in their tunnels.
Here are my two, Calypso and Graffiti.
View attachment 225825
View attachment 225824
I have two Eupalaestrus campestratus - one is a moult confirmed female and the other is a suspected male. I bought them in mid April at about 3/4" and they are now both around the 2" mark... maybe even a bit bigger. I don't find them to be that slow growing at all and, from what I have read, they are considered more of a medium growth species. They are both larger than my Grammostola pulchra, that I got around the same time, and the G.pulchra started out larger.
I find that mine both burrow a lot and I rarely see them. I recently had to rehouse them and they both had burrowed down into tunnels within a couple of hours. They have never turned down a meal unless they are in premoult. Both of mine have proven to be very tolerant and have shown no signs of defensive behaviour. I have heard stories that people have had less tolerant individuals, but the majority are not defensive. I keep their substrate drier, now that they are not spiderlings, but I do overflow their water dish. I have found them submerged completely in the water dish with their carapace under water. I have never had anyone do that before.
I love my two very much. They are very hard to find in Canada and I grabbed up the last two that our biggest seller in Canada had. Nobody has had them since. I only ordered one, but bought the other when I picked them up at an expo. They were more costly than many other spiderlings - double what you would pay for most beginner species and the same price as the G.pulchra.
I believe that they become much more visible as they get larger. I hope so, because they are really gorgeous and I miss seeing them. Now I only see them through the enclosure walls down in their tunnels.
Here are my two, Calypso and Graffiti.
View attachment 225825
View attachment 225824
Thank you for this as well :) I heard that the males live pretty long but Im not sure if its true. Thats why I wanted one in the first place, as I wanted a sling not an adult
 

mistertim

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I generally would also suggest you start out with a juvenile...preferably a sexed female. Slings are a bit more involved and more fragile so IMO it is a good idea to start with a juvenile so you can get your general tarantula husbandry down and from there move on to slings.
 

Andrea82

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My E.campestratus is the most calm and docile of T's that I have. Always visible, not burrowing much, except for pre molt phase. Nice feeding response as well, considering she is so calm, but never misses a feeder :)
I agree with getting a larger spider, my E.campestratus has molted twice in my care but didn't get much larger, but she's a young female.
Easy to keep, waterdish,hide, a good amount of substrate and some fake leaves, and you're done. Mine likes a bit of humidity now and then, so I overflow the waterdish regularly.
Never got a threatposture, and she only kicked hairs once towards a locust that jumped on her.
 

cold blood

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The only thing I worry about with slings is getting a male and not keeping it long but I also want to watch it grow. Kind of a dilemma
Its no dilemma, and not something you should even be worried about. This common anti-male sentiment is widespread and something beginners worry about, but shouldn't.

For a beginner, a male isn't necessarily a bad thing...no they don't live as long, but its not like they live for a year. You can still get 4-7 years out of a male (still a long time, there's dogs with that lifespan). And because of this, you will see faster growth (typically), which will allow you to observe the life cycle in a more timely manner. The other advantage a male offers is that it doesn't pin you into the hobby for 20 years. A male is great for beginners to determine if this is indeed the hobby for them.

Don't fear getting a male, without them, the hobby stops, they are valuable to someone and this allows you to sell or trade a male rather easily once it matures, which will essentially pay for the next t or batch of ts. I love getting males, they're the fastest, easiest way to expand your collection either for free or at very low costs.
 

Vanessa

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This common anti-male sentiment is widespread and something beginners worry about, but shouldn't.
Part of the issue, or stigma, attached to males comes from those within the hobby and it does make beginners worried. There are several members of this hobby who love to describe males as defensive and constant escape risks the moment that they mature and that isn't always the case. Whether they do that in order to pressure people into sending their males to them, or it is what they have experienced themselves, it doesn't help new people from being concerned about getting a male.
When you're talking about a huge tarantula, like a G.pulchripes, behaving in that manner, and where the person might not just be able to get rid of him to someone needing to breed him, then it does create concern for new people. It is not unreasonable for new people to want to avoid being in that situation when they don't have a lot of overall experience.
 

cold blood

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But in pulchripes for example, its only the females that are that large. Males typically mature right about the size of or smaller than a G. rosea...that is, about 5".
 

Vanessa

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My male G.pulchripes is well over 5". And that doesn't really matter anyway. I'm sure that there are plenty of new people who would be uncomfortable with an uncontrollable 5" male too.
All I'm saying is that you worded your response as if it is unreasonable for people to try to avoid males and that is not the case. Based on what they read, on forums like this one and elsewhere, the picture that people paint of males would make any new person a bit concerned. And while your points were very valid, regarding them being a great 'trial' for new people and that many of the males have a decent lifespan regardless, that is trumped by the picture that they have in their minds that they're going to end up with this huge, uncontrollable, creature trying to bolt from their enclosures constantly. And while that is something that everyone should be prepared for with ALL of them - it doesn't help males any to have that reputation over females.
I was very concerned, after reading for many years about mature male behaviour, when my G.pulchripes moulted into this very large mature male and I have had no problems with him. Yes, that might change, but for now he is acting the same as he always has. Had I not had the experience I do, the last thing I would want would be to deal with a mature male. Even with my experience I was concerned, so I don't think that new people are being unreasonable.
 

Ehliza

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Thanks for all of the help you guys. Honestly everything I read portrayed males as strictly breeding Ts. But the only reason I'm not too worried about slings is I've owned many spiders before just not Ts. So I'm a little experienced with small insects lol. But I found lots of slings for sale so I'll probably go with one
 

cold blood

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All I'm saying is that you worded your response as if it is unreasonable for people to try to avoid males and that is not the case.
Yep, that's exactly what I am saying...JMO. The negatives are all in ones mind, not based on reality. Its a stigma that I don't think is a fair one.

I do see MMs as skittish, but males aren't generally so before maturity. And while starting with skittish isn't something I recommend, in 4-7 years when that t matures, the keeper will no longer be a beginner and the skittishness will be much less of a big deal (as would be size).
 

cold blood

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Thanks for all of the help you guys. Honestly everything I read portrayed males as strictly breeding Ts.
Until a male matures, they are virtually indistinguishable from females.

They're only for breeding after the t matures, only then is it useful for breeding. Hobby breeders need males, and someone's got to raise them. I see every male as a new opportunity.

If you are pretty comfortable with them, the best thing to do is simply to buy multiple slings instead of just one. This gives you both better odds at a female, and options down the line to trade for more at virtually no cost. Buying one sling at a time of each species is by far the most expensive and time consuming way to build a collection.
 

EulersK

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Yep, that's exactly what I am saying...JMO. The negatives are all in ones mind, not based on reality. Its a stigma that I don't think is a fair one.
As a whole, I'm with you. I don't mind males at all - for all the reasons you gave. It is very disheartening, though, to have a favorite spider (especially when it's the only one of that species in your collection) turn out to be male.
 

cold blood

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As a whole, I'm with you. I don't mind males at all - for all the reasons you gave. It is very disheartening, though, to have a favorite spider (especially when it's the only one of that species in your collection) turn out to be male.
Not if you can get some of his offspring;)
 
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