Beetles as food

Professor T

Arachnodemon
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Apr 11, 2003
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I just fed my B. smithi a June Bug, Phyllophaga sp. which is really a beetle (Coleoptera). I am usually afraid to feed beetles to my T's but this species is good eating. They are also easy to catch, look for them by an outside light at night. Be careful in areas of pesticide useage. Otherwise its a free, high protein food source.

http://insects.tamu.edu/images/insects/fieldguide/bimg139.html
 
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Neo

Arachnosquire
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May 9, 2003
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145
Watch out for certain beetles that might be harmful. Research it before feeding. Beetles also have a hard armor over them so....

But sure, I suppose if you see its good go ahead, no harm done.
 

Professor T

Arachnodemon
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Originally posted by Neo
Watch out for certain beetles that might be harmful. Research it before feeding. Beetles also have a hard armor over them so....

But sure, I suppose if you see its good go ahead, no harm done.
Neo,

That is very true, some beetles could harm your T's. Some are carnivorous, some parasitic, and some chemically bad to eat.

June bugs are easily eaten and digested by T's, and are so easy to catch in spring and early summer, I thought I would share with people looking for alternate food sources from crickets.

Again, the danger is pesticides! So moderation is wise.
 

Professor T

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 11, 2003
Messages
724
WARNING ! Retraction!

Originally posted by Professor T
Neo,

That is very true, some beetles could harm your T's. Some are carnivorous, some parasitic, and some chemically bad to eat.

June bugs are easily eaten and digested by T's, and are so easy to catch in spring and early summer, I thought I would share with people looking for alternate food sources from crickets.

Again, the danger is pesticides! So moderation is wise.
I'm going to have to retract my recommendation about feeding any wild caught insect to your T's. The danger might be much greater than chemical pesticides.

On the thread titled "Invert Killer" they have been informing arachnoculturists of the danger of entomopathogenic nematodes . These nematodes (roundworms) have a symbiotic relationship with bacteria that rapidly kill insects, as well as arachnids! These "beneficial nematodes" are sold as a way to biologically control insect pests. If they are introduced into your arachnocultures, you will watch your tarantulas and scorpions die a horrible death.

Therefore, the risk of feeding wild caught insects becomes more than a chemical pesticide risk, it becomes a nematode infestation risk. I did not know about entomopathogenic nematodes when I posted this thread. Although June Bugs are not the target species for these entomopathogenic nematodes, beetles can be infected, so my original recommendation now seems unwise!

Link to more information:

http://www2.oardc.ohio-state.edu/nematodes/biologyecology.htm
 
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