Beetle grub?

RoachCoach

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Not sure why you took it out of it's nutritional container.
 

Matts inverts

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Give it tons of rotting wood and rotten leaves. It needs more burrowing space than it does to walk around. What state are you in. I’m in California so the only types here fly when they get bigger or flutter. Not sure where your at but in some states, there are stag beetles or Hercules beetles. Watch bugs in cyber space grub care for more info
 

The Mantis Menagerie

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This is a longhorn beetle larva. I am not as familiar with the West Coast species, but it may be the same Prionus genus we have in the east. Many of these longhorn species need living wood, however, I have found prionids in rotten logs as well. Fortunately, it looks as though it may be large enough to pupate, so I would give it a large enough container that you can have one section with soft rotten wood in case it is a species that eats it, another section with almond wood in case it is a pickier species, and a third with some local soil in case this species digs into that layer to pupate. Each of these sections should be at least twice as deep as the length of the larva. Be forewarned, though, that there is a good reason that longhorns are not commonly bred in the hobby, and it may not survive long.
 

The Mantis Menagerie

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Why aren’t they breed in the hobby
The need for live wood in many species. Other species only develop in undisturbed, freshly dead logs. Basically, they are much pickier about habitat than many other families, and the habitats they need make it hard to monitor them. If you were to breed them in captivity, then you might have to just keep a box with a log in it around for two years and hope that something comes out. You have no way to check if there are live grubs with some species, so you may find that nothing survived in the meantime and find you wasted two years of effort.
 

Matts inverts

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I know that sounds like a lot of work but I’m kinda considering doing that
 

Conor10

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Give it tons of rotting wood and rotten leaves. It needs more burrowing space than it does to walk around. What state are you in. I’m in California so the only types here fly when they get bigger or flutter. Not sure where your at but in some states, there are stag beetles or Hercules beetles. Watch bugs in cyber space grub care for more info
I’m from CA, I’m not sure but I think it might be illegal to own this. I will try to get it some live wood once it matures.
 

Matts inverts

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All beetles in California are legal if if they are from in the US. So if you collected some even if they are invasive, they are legal.
 

goliathusdavid

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All beetles in California are legal if if they are from in the US. So if you collected some even if they are invasive, they are legal.
Actually, this is incorrect. @Conor10 you are totally within the law, as I assume this was collected within your state, which is completely legal. But @Matts inverts, species such as Dynastes tityus will still require PPQ interstate permits, as they are not native to California. So will most of the desert beetles. You still need permits for native CA beetles if you are buying out of state, and you will need permits for any USA beetles not native to CA. And again, being invasive doesn't make a species legal to keep or sell.
 
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Matts inverts

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What size is the grub. If it’s small. It’s probably a long horn. I can’t really tell from the picture
 

Matts inverts

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Also, I would be careful because if it is small grub, it might be a borer which is a longhorn but they are invasive if accidentally let go. Some are native but it could be one of the species from europe.
 

The Mantis Menagerie

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Actually, this is incorrect. @Conor10 you are totally within the law, as I assume this was collected within your state, which is completely legal. But @Matts inverts, species such as Dynastes tityus will still require PPQ interstate permits, as they are not native to California. So will most of the desert beetles. You still need permits for native CA beetles if you are buying out of state, and you will need permits for any USA beetles not native to CA. And again, being invasive doesn't make a species legal to keep or sell.
This is also partially incorrect. Carabidae, Scarabeinae, and Odontotaenius disjunctus do not require a PPQ 526 permit to move interstate within the Continental US provided the individuals or their progenitors were collected within the Continental US. Then there is also Goliathus, but that is a different discussion.
 

goliathusdavid

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This is also partially incorrect. Carabidae, Scarabeinae, and Odontotaenius disjunctus do not require a PPQ 526 permit to move interstate within the Continental US provided the individuals or their progenitors were collected within the Continental US. Then there is also Goliathus, but that is a different discussion.
Thank you for this clarification! I should have been more specific. I knew about the Carabidae and Scarabeinae exceptions but had no idea about Odontotaenius disjunctus (a species I keep and do a lot of work with)! Is the latter a recent change? Again, my apologies for not being more specific, and thank you for correcting me!
 

The Mantis Menagerie

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Thank you for this clarification! I should have been more specific. I knew about the Carabidae and Scarabeinae exceptions but had no idea about Odontotaenius disjunctus (a species I keep and do a lot of work with)! Is the latter a recent change? Again, my apologies for not being more specific, and thank you for correcting me!
The bess beetle exemption seems little known, but because they only eat rotten wood at all stages, the USDA had them on the no permit required list prior to the list that came out August 9th, 2019. They do not seem to have been listed on the new list, but I do not think the old list was actually superseded and should therefore still be valid. Therefore, you should be able to move them around the Continental US with no permit requirement.
 
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