Baby scorpions falling?

Abhorsen

Arachnoknight
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Mar 2, 2016
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212
Well this reminds me of the whole thing with crested geckos and other new Caledonian geckos being parthenogenic as its very rare for it to happen but every once and a while it definitely happens. It could also be a similar rare event that can happen with this species or what you are calling Longimanus over there may not even be an actual H. Longimanus but is a similar looking species.
Thats what I was thinking as well, if it is really a different sp of longimanus, then that's the reason it is parthenogenic.
 

dragonfire1577

Arachnolord
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Oct 7, 2015
Messages
637
It wouldn't be a different sp of longimanus since that's contradicting itself as longimanus is the species name. If it was a different species or sp that means it would no longer be a longimanus but, it could be a different subspecies of longi or even a completely different heterometrus species in itself. Its also possibly a different population as I believe a species in the centruroides genus is only parthenogenic in one population In cuba.
 

dragonfire1577

Arachnolord
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Oct 7, 2015
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637
I still think that sperm retention is much more likely here though since H. longimanus has no evidence of being parthenogenic other than your claims. Is it possible you moved substrate or decor from a males tank and transferred a spermathophore into her tank somehow by accident Abhorsen?
 
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chanda

Arachnoking
Old Timer
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Jun 27, 2010
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2,113
My h. Longi recently gave birth. But now babies are falling and it's just their first day. Will they die? Is it beacuse there are too many of them that's why others fall?

Here's her picture when she was still giving birth.

View attachment 210920
I wish you luck with your scorplings. I purchased a wc female H. arizonensis a couple years ago who turned out to be gravid. Unfortunately, she had her babies while I was out of town and hubby was pet sitting. I wasn't there to see just how it happened, but either the babies didn't climb onto her back in the first place or she did not let them stay there. She may have snacked on a few, but most just died in the bottom of the cage. I tried ICU'ing the last few survivors when I got back, but no luck. I'm sure it was stress. Humidity (basically none) and temperature were fine, but I had been using her for classroom display (for a 2-week class, not year-round) and had intentionally kept her substrate shallow so she would be visible for the kids. I wasn't even 100% sure she was gravid and didn't expect her to pop quite so soon, so had not yet redone the enclosure to allow her to burrow.
 

darkness975

Latrodectus
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Aug 31, 2012
Messages
4,164
I wish you luck with your scorplings. I purchased a wc female H. arizonensis a couple years ago who turned out to be gravid. Unfortunately, she had her babies while I was out of town and hubby was pet sitting. I wasn't there to see just how it happened, but either the babies didn't climb onto her back in the first place or she did not let them stay there. She may have snacked on a few, but most just died in the bottom of the cage. I tried ICU'ing the last few survivors when I got back, but no luck. I'm sure it was stress. Humidity (basically none) and temperature were fine, but I had been using her for classroom display (for a 2-week class, not year-round) and had intentionally kept her substrate shallow so she would be visible for the kids. I wasn't even 100% sure she was gravid and didn't expect her to pop quite so soon, so had not yet redone the enclosure to allow her to burrow.
Was this a night class with Vampire hours??? My H. arizonensis don't even start looking like they want to emerge from their darkness until the ambient lighting is dimmed or eliminated lol.
 

chanda

Arachnoking
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Jun 27, 2010
Messages
2,113
Was this a night class with Vampire hours??? My H. arizonensis don't even start looking like they want to emerge from their darkness until the ambient lighting is dimmed or eliminated lol.
Nope, regular daylight hours. That's why I kept the substrate shallow - I could just dim the classroom lights and lift out her hide when I wanted to show her to the kids, then put it back after we were done looking at her. We also frequently used red bulbs in a darkened classroom to watch some of the nocturnal critters - especially when the kids wanted to watch them eat. She still spent most of her time in the dark, but it wasn't what she would have preferred. I'm pretty sure stress from lack of a burrow was what caused her to lose the babies.
 
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