B.vagans cohabitation?

skinheaddave

SkorpionSkin
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Any experiences with this? I have several males and two mature females. I have had some success with breeding through introduction/removal, but feel I might want to try cohabitation.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Immortal_sin

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Dave,
not specifically on B vagans...but I have a cohabitating pair of B smithi, and G rosea. Both I've been told should not be able to cohabitate, and so far, both pairs are doing well. I have plenty of hiding places for the male, and plenty of room, and that seems to be key.
I can't speak for B vagans, since I can't seem to find a male for my girl, but I'd say if you are willing to risk him becoming a meal, go for it!
I say chances of mating are better, they can do it on their own time, not when *we* chooose, and it's more natural. Of course, them becoming the dinner entree is also more *natural* as well!
Good luck!
Holley
 

skinheaddave

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Holley,

Well, one of my females seems to be far more defensive than the other. Although I have had some success with her, she is also the one that munched one of my males. My other female has always been docile, even when matings didn't happen, so I figure I can risk one of my three remaining males on her.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Steve Nunn

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Originally posted by skinheaddave
My other female has always been docile, even when matings didn't happen, so I figure I can risk one of my three remaining males on her.

Cheers,
Dave
Hi Dave,
I don't know how much luck you'll have, but if you do, it will be just luck. Even the known T's that cohabit in the wild have major problems in similar situations in captivity. As soon as a T is in captivity, many of the wild traits of that T are lost. Even if others have had success with cohabitation of this species in captivity it is impossible to replicate their situation. 1. Because you don't have the other keepers stock (all T's have different temperaments) and 2. It could cost a small fortune to exactly replicate someone elses setup (same temps and humidity).

Given the cannabilistic nature of ALL T's you face an uphill battle.

On the other hand you just won't know until you try it. All I'm saying is give it a go, but be fully prepared to lose spiders that may prove good breeders under other circumstances.

Cheers,
Steve
 

skinheaddave

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Steve,

I know there is no 100% guarantee. There are, however, species which are known to be better in cohabitation situations (i.e. P.regalis). I am trying to get a handle on whether or not this species has a reputation.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Steve Nunn

Arachnoprince
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Originally posted by skinheaddave
I am trying to get a handle on whether or not this species has a reputation.

Cheers,
Dave
Good luck with it then Dave. And if you do have any success, please post how it all works for you.

Cheers,
Steve
 
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