B smithi - deformed/lost limbs post molt - what's next?

Unravel

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 27, 2010
Messages
140
Hello,

my smithi has had a huge belly for months, and black for a week. i went away on vacation for 3 days coming back to it in the middle of the tank. At first i was very happy to see her out and about but then i noticed that all but her four six limbs (2 middle ones slightly thinner, 2 normal front ones, and the 2 limbs next to the fangs) are deformed/damaged. Most of them are short stubs, middle ones slightly longer, but all are damaged/deformed. It is a small T, post molt she is about 2.5-3 inches, and still fairly young. She has problems ambulating but still can even if not well at all. What's next? What are her chances? I read somewhere that lost limbs regenerate but deformed ones get worse...

Thank you

- Updated with pics



 
Last edited:

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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Jul 20, 2007
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5,363
Pictures would be helpful.

The small legs near her fangs are called pedipalps. :)

Lost limbs do regenerate, and deformed limbs can get worse, but this isn't always the case when it comes to deformed limbs (lost limbs always regenerate).

Depending on the deformity and how it's affecting the spider, it may end up casting the limb(s) itself in order to regenerate them next time. If the deformity isn't bad, then it can repair itself in the next molt or two.

I'd leave the spider alone...give it a couple weeks to harden up before feeding, then make sure you keep a close eye on it to verify it can catch prey. Feed it well, keep a good supply of water available so it is well-hydrated for its next molt (internal hydration is much more important than external hydration), and read up on methods or helping the spider through the molt if you think the deformed legs are stuck.
 

Unravel

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 27, 2010
Messages
140
updated with pictures,

at least she was drinking some water and her belly is full for now. some substrate (eco earth) was sticking to one of her deformed limbs but i carefully pulled it off with tongues. does she need ICU? I'll do whatever's required.

Thanks again
 

bobusboy

Arachnoknight
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Jul 31, 2010
Messages
287
If she's mobile, and not leaking and the I and II legs are fine I'd just leave her be.

Only things I'd change is tong feeding, or pre killed prey. And I'd remove anything in the enclosure that she could get suck under or in between. She has a lot less torque per se, with only half her legs working and I'd power feed to reduce time to the next moult.

Some one else can give you advice regarding helping her lose the legs as that might be necessary for them to grow back properly.
 

Unravel

Arachnosquire
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Nov 27, 2010
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actually, as you can see in pic 2 and i just noticed in person.. the middle leg is sorta attached to the hind leg but detached from the body.. guess that's one
 

jimip

Arachnosquire
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Oct 26, 2010
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what happened to it? i hope it works out nicely keep us posted.
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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Wow.

I don't think the spider should have much of a problem regenerating those. Just keep it fed and hydrated and wait for a molt.
 

KoriTamashii

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Nov 21, 2009
Messages
420
Pictures would be helpful.

The small legs near her fangs are called pedipalps. :)

Lost limbs do regenerate, and deformed limbs can get worse, but this isn't always the case when it comes to deformed limbs (lost limbs always regenerate).

Depending on the deformity and how it's affecting the spider, it may end up casting the limb(s) itself in order to regenerate them next time. If the deformity isn't bad, then it can repair itself in the next molt or two.

I'd leave the spider alone...give it a couple weeks to harden up before feeding, then make sure you keep a close eye on it to verify it can catch prey. Feed it well, keep a good supply of water available so it is well-hydrated for its next molt (internal hydration is much more important than external hydration), and read up on methods or helping the spider through the molt if you think the deformed legs are stuck.

Couldn't have said it better myself. Listen to this man, he knows what he's talkin' 'bout!

And good luck. :)
 

KnightinGale

Arachnoknight
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Sep 16, 2009
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170
Yes, I noticed too that in the second picture one leg looks partially detatched already. There's a good chance she may just cast that one off herself. It looks, to me, that the others may have had more to them when she first molted as well and are now shrivelling up in the damaged areas...probably because of no circulation. They may even dry up and fall off as well (or she may pull them) leaving just the healthy segments.
I agree with keeping her well-fed and hydrated and leaving her be. I wouldn't dampen the substrate or anything, but if you want to make absolutely sure she is staying hydrated, you might want to gently put her mouth in her water dish every couple weeks or so. I also agree with tong feeding or pre-killed until she molts herself some new limbs. I would keep her plump, but not overly fat.
 

Unravel

Arachnosquire
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Messages
140
Thank you for the replies, I will just leave her alone and provide water and accessible pray. Do they usually force a molt or will I need to wait awhile since b smithis are really slow to go about their cycles
 

paassatt

Arachnoangel
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Nov 19, 2010
Messages
887
I had what was about a 2 inch L. parahybana molt this past Christmas (what are the odds for that) into a more adult-looking 3+ incher. Point of the story is the joints in between the tarsus and metatarsus on a couple of its legs have the same brown, callous looking material as the B. smithi in the two pictures above. Obviously it isn't as bad on mine, as the OP's didn't even have its legs fully grow. Mine just looks like the brown is where the joint is supposed to be. Does anyone know exactly why it looks brown and hard and what it is?
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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That is a sad sight indeed. :( Are its fangs intact and undeformed? With the legs and pedipalps it should be able to stumble through this instar and make it to the next molt and hopefully regenerate them, but if they look that bad I would want to make sure the fangs were alright. I would definitely give this T a week or more before messing with it, or feeding it, so finding out if they are in working order may have to wait. Good luck to the poor baby, hopefully it will get some legs back on its next molt.
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
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Jul 2, 2010
Messages
283
Thank you for the replies, I will just leave her alone and provide water and accessible pray. Do they usually force a molt or will I need to wait awhile since b smithis are really slow to go about their cycles
As was mentioned - - if you powerfeed through this next molt cycle, it will molt sooner (but still not exceptionally fast with smithis). You should also keep it just a bit warmer if possible - - I'd personally aim for low 80s F.
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
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I wouldn't powerfeed...you want to give it more time to regenerate those limbs.

Also doesn't look like a wet molt to me. Looks like the legs got stuck and either shriveled or broke off from the molt.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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I wouldn't powerfeed...you want to give it more time to regenerate those limbs.
I was thinking that same thing. When it is trying to regenerate something, why try and force it to molt sooner than normal? I would think you would want to do the opposite.
 

Musicwolf

Arachnoknight
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Messages
283
I was thinking that same thing. When it is trying to regenerate something, why try and force it to molt sooner than normal? I would think you would want to do the opposite.
Well, to this point I've never come up against this problem, so I cannot say that I speak from experience either way. However, I know that the opposing argument that usually comes up is that you cannot actually "force" a T to molt. Powerfeeding and raising temps supposedly actually speed up the regeneration process and that's how they reduce the time between molts. The T still won't molt until it's ready, you would just be helping it get ready faster.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
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Well, to this point I've never come up against this problem, so I cannot say that I speak from experience either way. However, I know that the opposing argument that usually comes up is that you cannot actually "force" a T to molt. Powerfeeding and raising temps supposedly actually speed up the regeneration process and that's how they reduce the time between molts. The T still won't molt until it's ready, you would just be helping it get ready faster.
Force was not the best choice of words, but hurry would be better. I have never dealt with this kind of deformity, but the ones I did have, I fed slowly and kept cooler in hopes of more time before the molt. Different situations entirely though and purely my opinion on what to do in this situation.
 

Unravel

Arachnosquire
Joined
Nov 27, 2010
Messages
140
Thank you for the replies

im now just wondering what could have happened.. is the hide i provided too small? Incorrect humidity? (first T, maybe i kept her too humid, misting sides and overflowing waterdish)

I have an A. Geniculata waiting to molt and i just hope it pulls through and that im not making these creatures worse off. Hopefully this was just a random occurance.
 
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