B hamorii white spot

Sixflyingdogs

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
6
Hey guys, just adopted my first T and just noticed something that made me a bit concerned. As I’m new to the hobby, I’m not quite sure what this could be(mold, post malt, ect) but maybe y’all can help me out. Noticed a small white spot on one of my ladies front legs. Any help is appreciated
 

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Smotzer

Arachnoking
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Jan 17, 2020
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3,204
Yeah? Anything I can or should do about it?
I mean that’s what it looks like to me! And nope nothing you need to do, or can do.

since you are new to keeping and this is your first, can you explain how you are keeping it, amd post pictures of the entire enclosure to make sure it’s set up correctly and you have the right info?
 

Sixflyingdogs

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
6
I mean that’s what it looks like to me! And nope nothing you need to do, or can do.

since you are new to keeping and this is your first, can you explain how you are keeping it, amd post pictures of the entire enclosure to make sure it’s set up correctly and you have the right info?
Yes I’m at work at the moment but I will provide some more photos and info when I get home! I appreciate it 👍 here’s a photo I had in my phone already of the enclosure that was provided by the previous owner. I’m aware that the humidity appears high and this species thrives in a drier environment so I plan on redoing the inside today after work. I only have cocofiber substrate at the moment but open to suggestions as I’d love to be able to provide the best care for my new friend. Also only had her for 2 days.
 

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Smotzer

Arachnoking
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Yes I’m at work at the moment but I will provide some more photos and info when I get home! I appreciate it 👍 here’s a photo I had in my phone already of the enclosure that was provided by the previous owner. I’m aware that the humidity appears high and this species thrives in a drier environment so I plan on redoing the inside today after work. I only have cocofiber substrate at the moment but open to suggestions as I’d love to be able to provide the best care for my new friend. Also only had her for 2 days.
It looks like an okay size enclosure they do better for most people set up in smaller enclosures, the tendency for mew people is to think they need all this room and waaaay over size their enclosures but in reality they do not use or need a lot of room. so it’s good in real there.

Like you pointed out I would probably replace the substrate, or just let it dry out because it looks evenly moist across the entire surface which for a Brachypelma at this size they should be on dry or mostly dry substrate. You have large ish looking ventilation holes so it should dry quickily I’d think.

Cocofiver works, I personally don’t use it and don’t like it. If you use it you need to really pack it down, because they don’t like walking on fluffy coco-fiber and may stay off the ground if not.
I use 100% peat moss and or 100% top soil. Both available at home improvement stores and garden centers for dirt cheap! 😉And peat is great because it can serve as the organic component to soil mixes for plants.

More important than what you use, is making sure that whatever you use you read the ingredients label and make sure it is 100% pure, and 100% free from inorganic and organic fertilizers,horticultural chemical additives, wettings agents, and soul conditioners; free from all additives. If not it could kill the tarantula. Once you are sure of that you can use any combination of substrates in various combinations or pure to suit your personal preference.
 

Sixflyingdogs

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
6
It looks like an okay size enclosure they do better for most people set up in smaller enclosures, the tendency for mew people is to think they need all this room and waaaay over size their enclosures but in reality they do not use or need a lot of room. so it’s good in real there.

Like you pointed out I would probably replace the substrate, or just let it dry out because it looks evenly moist across the entire surface which for a Brachypelma at this size they should be on dry or mostly dry substrate. You have large ish looking ventilation holes so it should dry quickily I’d think.

Cocofiver works, I personally don’t use it and don’t like it. If you use it you need to really pack it down, because they don’t like walking on fluffy coco-fiber and may stay off the ground if not.
I use 100% peat moss and or 100% top soil. Both available at home improvement stores and garden centers for dirt cheap! 😉And peat is great because it can serve as the organic component to soil mixes for plants.

More important than what you use, is making sure that whatever you use you read the ingredients label and make sure it is 100% pure, and 100% free from inorganic and organic fertilizers,horticultural chemical additives, wettings agents, and soul conditioners; free from all additives. If not it could kill the tarantula. Once you are sure of that you can use any combination of substrates in various combinations or pure to suit your personal preference.
Thank you so much for your time and advice! I’ve been having a hard time finding info about when it is time to upgrade and upsize the enclosure. Is there a common rule to this? Thanks again 👍
 

Smotzer

Arachnoking
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Thank you so much for your time and advice! I’ve been having a hard time finding info about when it is time to upgrade and upsize the enclosure. Is there a common rule to this? Thanks again 👍
You are welcome, happpy to help!

Well yours is right at the size where it could probably go up slightly, but that it will also likely be okay for at least another molt. You know I don't exactly know what the general rule of thumb is for increases, because it largely depends on how you set it up.

So Big enclosures are not necessarily bad, it all comes down to how it is set up. A big enclsoure for a small tarantula that is barren, with just a piece of cork bark and a water dish, will lead to it very likely feeling insecure and hiding and being more elusive or burrowing down for extended periods of time. But if serious effort is put into designing and decorating a extremely large space it can be made to work but this is more for the advanced keeper; such as @Dorifto 's set ups.

Why bigger enclosures are worse for new folks is for the above reasons, and means for the new keeper having a hard time feeding and not seeing it for extended periods of time which instill a big worry in them. So we recommend smaller enclosures because it is all around better for the T and the human is managing its husbandry and care. A tarantula is a appropriately smaller enclosure can adapt the entire thing as its burrow.

To give you an example of what i am referencing with regards to setting up enclosures the below picture is for a regarded as extremely reclusive spider. I could have set it up with just a piece of bark and substrate and it would have been fine, but I wouldn't see it very much. Instead it is set up more 'naturally' with amble clutter in appropriate places. I see it everyday. the third picture is an example of a set up for a different terrestrial with a design to clutter up in a way that helps them settle in IME (this is not big for its size its just about right maybe 2-3x DLS. How you set it up kinda makes more of a difference than the strict style but it can go both ways.



IMG_0818.jpg
 

Sixflyingdogs

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
6
You are welcome, happpy to help!

Well yours is right at the size where it could probably go up slightly, but that it will also likely be okay for at least another molt. You know I don't exactly know what the general rule of thumb is for increases, because it largely depends on how you set it up.

So Big enclosures are not necessarily bad, it all comes down to how it is set up. A big enclsoure for a small tarantula that is barren, with just a piece of cork bark and a water dish, will lead to it very likely feeling insecure and hiding and being more elusive or burrowing down for extended periods of time. But if serious effort is put into designing and decorating a extremely large space it can be made to work but this is more for the advanced keeper; such as @Dorifto 's set ups.

Why bigger enclosures are worse for new folks is for the above reasons, and means for the new keeper having a hard time feeding and not seeing it for extended periods of time which instill a big worry in them. So we recommend smaller enclosures because it is all around better for the T and the human is managing its husbandry and care. A tarantula is a appropriately smaller enclosure can adapt the entire thing as its burrow.

To give you an example of what i am referencing with regards to setting up enclosures the below picture is for a regarded as extremely reclusive spider. I could have set it up with just a piece of bark and substrate and it would have been fine, but I wouldn't see it very much. Instead it is set up more 'naturally' with amble clutter in appropriate places. I see it everyday. the third picture is an example of a set up for a different terrestrial with a design to clutter up in a way that helps them settle in IME (this is not big for its size its just about right maybe 2-3x DLS. How you set it up kinda makes more of a difference than the strict style but it can go both ways.



View attachment 399005
Oh sick! Sounds good, makes sense. Definitely understanding the concept a lot more.
 

Smotzer

Arachnoking
Active Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
3,204
Oh sick! Sounds good, makes sense. Definitely understanding the concept a lot more.
Great!! Glad to hear that! most folks say that decorations are more for us than the tarantula, and that may be true in regards to things like fake skulls, but in my experience fake plant decoorations can go a long way into making reclusive T's feel secure and be out more. Your Brachypelma wont likely have that problem they are usually display T's. It may be hard to see in this next photo, but for this "defensive" fossorial I placed more substrate in the back and burried and piece of african root, I use as a substitute for cork bark, with an opening in and some clutter around sloping down towards the other end where the water dish is, this would be a options for style of set up like for yours. Need to change that water out :rofl: IMG_0929.jpg
 

Sixflyingdogs

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
6
Great!! Glad to hear that! most folks say that decorations are more for us than the tarantula, and that may be true in regards to things like fake skulls, but in my experience fake plant decoorations can go a long way into making reclusive T's feel secure and be out more. Your Brachypelma wont likely have that problem they are usually display T's. It may be hard to see in this next photo, but for this "defensive" fossorial I placed more substrate in the back and burried and piece of african root, I use as a substitute for cork bark, with an opening in and some clutter around sloping down towards the other end where the water dish is, this would be a options for style of set up like for yours. Need to change that water out :rofl: View attachment 399006
That looks great, I definitely see what you mean by giving them some kind of shadow/decorations to hide behind if they feel the need. Going to have to research some more brachy enclosures.
 
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