B. Albo thinks everything is food

SpencerChase

Arachnopeon
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Nov 13, 2015
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0
Hi!

I've tried searching for an answer to this question and couldn't find anything, but it seems like a fairly common question so I apologize if it's been posted already!

So I've had my male Honduran Curly Hair for about a year now. He's about 4 inches and I love him and his ways of living to death. I know they're supposed to be "docile" in nature and I wouldn't be asking this about a species that's supposed to be more defensive... but he thinks everything that touches him - paintbrush, forceps, dirt, anything - is prey. Immediately, within a microsecond of something touching him, he turns around and strikes and sometimes starts climbing up whatever made contact with his body... as he's getting bigger it's concerning me a little more. And it doesn't matter whether he's eaten in a while, this has happened every time I've tried on various feeding density periods.

Although it would be nice I'm not too concerned about handling him, but more about moving him away from his water dish to clean it, changing enclosures, removing boluses etc.

Again, if this was a more defensive species of T I wouldn't really be asking this, but since it's a species known to be more docile I can't help but ask if there's a way to get him to stop doing this. Am I poking him wrong? Is there a specific way to do it that I'm missing?

Thanks in advance!
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
205
Hi!

I've tried searching for an answer to this question and couldn't find anything, but it seems like a fairly common question so I apologize if it's been posted already!

So I've had my male Honduran Curly Hair for about a year now. He's about 4 inches and I love him and his ways of living to death. I know they're supposed to be "docile" in nature and I wouldn't be asking this about a species that's supposed to be more defensive... but he thinks everything that touches him - paintbrush, forceps, dirt, anything - is prey. Immediately, within a microsecond of something touching him, he turns around and strikes and sometimes starts climbing up whatever made contact with his body... as he's getting bigger it's concerning me a little more. And it doesn't matter whether he's eaten in a while, this has happened every time I've tried on various feeding density periods.

Although it would be nice I'm not too concerned about handling him, but more about moving him away from his water dish to clean it, changing enclosures, removing boluses etc.

Again, if this was a more defensive species of T I wouldn't really be asking this, but since it's a species known to be more docile I can't help but ask if there's a way to get him to stop doing this. Am I poking him wrong? Is there a specific way to do it that I'm missing?

Thanks in advance!
Although B albos are generally docile some individuals can be more defensive than others.
Could it be it is hungry? How often are you feeding & what size prey are you offering?
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
Don't poke him! I get angry, too, when somebody pokes me. And I agree with Clive82. My big female can consume 3 crickets a week if I let her lol. Also, is your male mature? If he is than he might be more defensive. And some spiders are more defensive than others.
 

mack1855

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Sep 5, 2016
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577
There is no " right way",to poke them.How about just opening his enclosure,and observe him for a while.See if he crawls out of the enclosure in a controlled area.Have a catch cup in case he decides to go off on his own.get to know it a little before hasseling him with anything.
maybe he will just sit and stare at you,as you stare at him.A bond will form,sort of:).I would think after a year,you would have done this already.If hes been doing this for a year,then you already know his attitude.
 

mack1855

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Don't take that literally.Just meant stop poking it .let it move around of its own,and see how it behaves.
Yes we know they don't behave like Labs.didnt mean to imply that he would give you a kiss and hug.
 

clive 82

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
205
Hi!

I've tried searching for an answer to this question and couldn't find anything, but it seems like a fairly common question so I apologize if it's been posted already!

So I've had my male Honduran Curly Hair for about a year now. He's about 4 inches and I love him and his ways of living to death. I know they're supposed to be "docile" in nature and I wouldn't be asking this about a species that's supposed to be more defensive... but he thinks everything that touches him - paintbrush, forceps, dirt, anything - is prey. Immediately, within a microsecond of something touching him, he turns around and strikes and sometimes starts climbing up whatever made contact with his body... as he's getting bigger it's concerning me a little more. And it doesn't matter whether he's eaten in a while, this has happened every time I've tried on various feeding density periods.

Although it would be nice I'm not too concerned about handling him, but more about moving him away from his water dish to clean it, changing enclosures, removing boluses etc.

Again, if this was a more defensive species of T I wouldn't really be asking this, but since it's a species known to be more docile I can't help but ask if there's a way to get him to stop doing this. Am I poking him wrong? Is there a specific way to do it that I'm missing?

Thanks in advance!
You could also try feeding it & when its actually eating then go about doing your maintainance, refilling water dishes etc. He may be less likely to be defensive if he has some grub in his chops lol!
 

Robyn8

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Feb 24, 2016
Messages
195
If somebody slapped my butt, i'd turn around and be pissed too. why are you poking him?
 

Estein

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Feb 11, 2016
Messages
154
Although it would be nice I'm not too concerned about handling him, but more about moving him away from his water dish to clean it, changing enclosures, removing boluses etc.
Tongs come in handy for things like picking up boluses and water dishes. If you're worried about your T striking the tongs and injuring a fang or something along those lines, I'd just place a cup over your T for the couple of minutes it takes to do maintenance. There probably won't be a maintenance need so pressing that it can't wait until your T is in an ideal area of the enclosure, so you won't have to worry about prodding it away from whatever you're trying to work with. When you're done, just let it be as you normally would because I imagine it's not that enjoyable to suddenly have a giant cup descend over you from the heavens.
 

Vanessa

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I have a couple that I will feed before trying to perform maintenance in their enclosure. Eating will often preoccupy them while you do what you have to. Minimize your interaction with them and make sure that you aren't putting your hand in their enclosure. You should always work with tongs.
They're all individuals. And, while many species have a reputation of being more tolerant than others, that is no guarantee that every individual will be as tolerant as the species on a whole.
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,610
Tongs come in handy for things like picking up boluses and water dishes. If you're worried about your T striking the tongs and injuring a fang or something along those lines, I'd just place a cup over your T for the couple of minutes it takes to do maintenance. There probably won't be a maintenance need so pressing that it can't wait until your T is in an ideal area of the enclosure, so you won't have to worry about prodding it away from whatever you're trying to work with. When you're done, just let it be as you normally would because I imagine it's not that enjoyable to suddenly have a giant cup descend over you from the heavens.
This ^^^ Since my B.albopilosum male matured, he is extremely skittish and defensive. I just put a delicup over him when I need to refill his waterdish or do maintenance. If I wouldn't, he would chase me/the tongs through the enclosure, slapping and threatposing. Before he molted, he was one of the most docile spiders,but he molted into a grumpy MM.
And remember, their waterdishes are sacred. You are not allowed to take them away for anything, according to them, anyways. ;)
 

BorisTheSpider

Overly Complicated
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May 26, 2009
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489
My female Albo is anything but docile . She readily charges anytime I have to do tank maintenance . She never postures but anything that goes in her enclosure is going to get bitten .
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
I'm so glad that my AF B. albopilosum is docile. She had her hormonial moment of teenage defensiveness for a few weeks, then back to normal. Thankfully.
 

SpiderDad61

Arachnoknight
Joined
Oct 25, 2015
Messages
186
Hi!

I've tried searching for an answer to this question and couldn't find anything, but it seems like a fairly common question so I apologize if it's been posted already!

So I've had my male Honduran Curly Hair for about a year now. He's about 4 inches and I love him and his ways of living to death. I know they're supposed to be "docile" in nature and I wouldn't be asking this about a species that's supposed to be more defensive... but he thinks everything that touches him - paintbrush, forceps, dirt, anything - is prey. Immediately, within a microsecond of something touching him, he turns around and strikes and sometimes starts climbing up whatever made contact with his body... as he's getting bigger it's concerning me a little more. And it doesn't matter whether he's eaten in a while, this has happened every time I've tried on various feeding density periods.

Although it would be nice I'm not too concerned about handling him, but more about moving him away from his water dish to clean it, changing enclosures, removing boluses etc.

Again, if this was a more defensive species of T I wouldn't really be asking this, but since it's a species known to be more docile I can't help but ask if there's a way to get him to stop doing this. Am I poking him wrong? Is there a specific way to do it that I'm missing?

Thanks in advance!
U may just need to feed em a tad more BUT all my albop have mighty appetites. Even when not hungry they'll walk towards me shaking a brush in front of em. If u wanted to test his hunger/aggression, drip some water drops right in front of em and see if he attacks. If so, feed em...if not, do ur maintenance and whatever else.
It's not recommended by all on here but I hold most of my Ts once in a while. With my albop, when I open their enclosures I rustle around a bit, to show em it's not prey...it's me. Doing that gets them ready in that now they won't attack if a single hair is touched
 

SpencerChase

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 13, 2015
Messages
0
Although B albos are generally docile some individuals can be more defensive than others.
Could it be it is hungry? How often are you feeding & what size prey are you offering?
I've fed him anywhere from one large cricket in 2 weeks and sometimes 5 in a week. Unless in pre molt, he's never refused food!

There is no " right way",to poke them.How about just opening his enclosure,and observe him for a while.See if he crawls out of the enclosure in a controlled area.Have a catch cup in case he decides to go off on his own.get to know it a little before hasseling him with anything.
maybe he will just sit and stare at you,as you stare at him.A bond will form,sort of:).I would think after a year,you would have done this already.If hes been doing this for a year,then you already know his attitude.
If I put his enclosure on a conveyer belt moving toward a wildfire, he wouldn't leave. I've had the top open for hours, he has never even climbed the walls.

Don't poke him! I get angry, too, when somebody pokes me. And I agree with Clive82. My big female can consume 3 crickets a week if I let her lol. Also, is your male mature? If he is than he might be more defensive. And some spiders are more defensive than others.
He is not mature.

You could also try feeding it & when its actually eating then go about doing your maintainance, refilling water dishes etc. He may be less likely to be defensive if he has some grub in his chops lol!
I have tried this, but the issue is he always eats on his feeding mat, which is attached to his water bowl... so if I have to pick it up, he kicks hairs!

If somebody slapped my butt, i'd turn around and be pissed too. why are you poking him?
Don't poke him. Problem solved.
Ok, I should be more literal... would "coax" be a better word? "Push"? I don't really "poke" him unless he's in the way of me changing/cleaning his enclosure, washing the water bowl, etc

In the end, I can definitely manage if he just "has that kind of attitude", but I was just wondering if anyone had any insight to whether I was doing something wrong! Thanks again!
 
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