AVICULARIA REVISION PUBLISHED!

aurusantula

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 1, 2015
Messages
49
I'm sorry...but that went straight over my head....:D To each his own, dinosaurs are not really my cup of tea ;)
Nah that's fair. Basically: sharptooths are now more closely related to everything that isn't a long neck, instead of sharp tooths and long necks being more closely related. If that helps at all :p
 

Siderum

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 2, 2007
Messages
39
I disagree entirely. While it WOULD be a form of hybridization, it wouldnt be a bad thing as it would still be the same SPECIES. As i understand it, the issue with hybrids is they dilute the species. This wouldnt happen with breeding different morphotypes of the SAME species. It would provide genetic diversity and possibly help them develop. Odds are, a different morphotype probably didnt come from parents of identical morphotypes in the wild.
There is merit to your argument if these species dubbed "nomen dubia" do sort out to be merely morphotypes. We are not there yet, even with this published paper. The danger of hybridization (for the sake of preserving a species in captivity) far outweighs the danger of loss of genetic diversity at the moment.
 

CEC

Arachnoangel
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
Messages
853
I completely disagree with mixing color forms. Most hobbyists agree with me, just looking at all the other genera with color forms of one species. Yes, it's not really hybridization but would be merely different breeds but I like my color forms and I'm sure most people would agree to keep the color forms.
Another thing that will confuse most hobbyists about labeling, is there are different localities/color forms within most of the morphotypes. So just using morphotype numbers would be pointless in the attempt to keep locality integrity. Thus, why keeping the pet trade name of the species that are considered nomen dubium will be significant in helping deter mutts.
 
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JoshDM020

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
358
There is merit to your argument if these species dubbed "nomen dubia" do sort out to be merely morphotypes. We are not there yet, even with this published paper. The danger of hybridization (for the sake of preserving a species in captivity) far outweighs the danger of loss of genetic diversity at the moment.
Fair point. Hopefully with more research we may be able to breed them more like they could possibly in the wild.
 

BobBarley

Arachnoprince
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
1,481
Don't mix the different forms of a species.... it's the same with Poecilotheria bara's change to subfusca so there now being two different subfusca's in the trade, lowland and highland. Both have probably been mixed because of it. Although this isn't a recent example, this is a valid example.

For a more recent example, check out the two different forms of Brachypelma albopilosum. One from Honduras (and most of the hybridized) and the new form from Nicaragua which looks completely different. Sure they are the same species, but that doesn't justify mixing them up willy nilly.

Then there are the literal tons of "Rosies" being and that have been imported... Some may turn out to be the same species, but it's still imperative to keep them separate.

Just my 2 cents and anyone is entitled to disagree.
 
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