Asain Forest Scorpion questions

kazzzj

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
8
I'm a new member, but I've visited this site many times before joining, for info on a couple of my arachnids. I have a few questions/clarifications about keeping an Asian Black Forest Scorpion.

First, I read a thread here, that said emperors need almost the same type of environment as forest scorpions and a link was posted to a care sheet for emperor scorpions. The care sheet said to keep the temperature around 90 degrees on the warm side of the enclosure. Then I read another thread here that said asian forest scorpions prefer the temp in the mid to high 70s. I just want to get the temperature as close as I can to being correct so any clarification would be appreciated.

Second, I've read that they sometimes like to burrow into the substrate. I have had him/her for about 6 months and I've never seen any attempt to burrow. Is that something I should be concerned about. I am currently using coco fiber, packed down and kept moist.

Third, I recently read to have an "under the tank heater" stuck to the side of the tank instead of under it. Since I've moved it, the scorpion has been keeping close to the wall next to the heater, outside of its "warm side" hide, which is right next to the heater. Temperature on the warm side is almost 80 degrees and the cool side is right at 70 degrees. Am I doing something wrong?

Thanks in advance for any advice!
 

Dr SkyTower

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2019
Messages
559
is there enough substrate for your scorpion to burrow into? Like Poonjab has said, pics of the enclosure would be a great help!
 

Lubed Tweezer

Arachnolord
Active Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2019
Messages
609
I'm always going for loose substrate: coco fiber, a bit of potting soil and loads of moss mixed in.
You need at least 8cm of it. Most people go for a layer anywhere in between 8-12cm.
The scorpion won't burrow if the substrate is too compact, it simply can't burrow.
The difference in temperatures that you've seen depends on what strategy you are aiming for.
Very natural circumstances do have those lower temperatures in their descriptions, those lower temperatures are fine for a while simulating a slightly colder season.
Introducing a colder season in the enclosure also means that your scorpion will become pretty inactive during that time.
Keep in mind that going colder also creeps up/down to the limits of what the scorpion is able to handle, too cold for too long will kill the scorpion.
Another strategy that many keepers aim for is the higher temperature and high humidity circumstances (favorable feeding + mating season), but then just keep those all year round.
That way your scorpion will be active (as far as you can call scorpions active) pretty much year round.
Prescribed temperatures are for daytime, the heating can be turned off at night, preferably when the sun goes down.
 

kazzzj

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
8
Here's its enclosure. The hide on the cool side is half of a ceramic flower pot that I dug down into the substrate (could the depth make him not feel the need to burrow?) and covered up with bark to help hide the opening and try to make him feel a little safer and to look a little more natural. The coco fiber is 3" deep.
 

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kazzzj

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
8
I'm always going for loose substrate: coco fiber, a bit of potting soil and loads of moss mixed in.
You need at least 8cm of it. Most people go for a layer anywhere in between 8-12cm.
The scorpion won't burrow if the substrate is too compact, it simply can't burrow.
The difference in temperatures that you've seen depends on what strategy you are aiming for.
Very natural circumstances do have those lower temperatures in their descriptions, those lower temperatures are fine for a while simulating a slightly colder season.
Introducing a colder season in the enclosure also means that your scorpion will become pretty inactive during that time.
Keep in mind that going colder also creeps up/down to the limits of what the scorpion is able to handle, too cold for too long will kill the scorpion.
Another strategy that many keepers aim for is the higher temperature and high humidity circumstances (favorable feeding + mating season), but then just keep those all year round.
That way your scorpion will be active (as far as you can call scorpions active) pretty much year round.
Prescribed temperatures are for daytime, the heating can be turned off at night, preferably when the sun goes down.
So then would you suggest plugging the heaters into a thermostat and setting it to 90 degrees, then unplugging it at night?
 

Lubed Tweezer

Arachnolord
Active Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2019
Messages
609
That's what i do, thermostat + timer.
It looks like you could add some more substrate, mix in some spagnum moss as well.
The moss helps retain moisture and keeps the substrate 'loose'.
Water ½ of the surface of the substrate, pour water on it just like your water your plants.
Aim for a relative humidity above 60%.
Depending on ambient factors, keeping humidity up is usually only achievable with limited ventilation.
 

kazzzj

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
8
That's what i do, thermostat + timer.
It looks like you could add some more substrate, mix in some spagnum moss as well.
The moss helps retain moisture and keeps the substrate 'loose'.
Water ½ of the surface of the substrate, pour water on it just like your water your plants.
Aim for a relative humidity above 60%.
Depending on ambient factors, keeping humidity up is usually only achievable with limited ventilation.
Ok sounds good, thanks for the advice. I did tape saran wrap over 2/3rds of the screen to help with humidity and it seems to be keeping it around 70%. Yesterday I added another small heater to the warm side and that got the temp to about 77 degrees. Then I added one of the red nocturnal heat bulbs, hooked up to the thermostat set to 85. I didnt want to keep it on for long or turn it up to 90 degrees until I had confirmation that 90 was an ok temp. Is all that acceptable?
 

Lubed Tweezer

Arachnolord
Active Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2019
Messages
609
Is all that acceptable?
That would be fine, I keep mine at 28-34°C (82-93°F) during daytime.
Below 18°C (64°F) for several days is danger and also don't go above 50°C (122°F) which is too high and deadly, even for a short time.
28-34°C is their favorable temperature, it keeps them active when darkness sets in and running those temps during the day makes sure the temp at night doesn't fall too drastically.
It's nice to have some 'head room' at both sides.
 

kazzzj

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 26, 2020
Messages
8
It's nice to have some 'head room' at both sides.
[/QUOTE]

By "head room" do you mean, keeping the temp up during the day, so it doesnt drop too low at night, or a difference in temps on both sides?
 
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