Arizona blond help

tristan4033

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My Arizona blond keeps knocking over her water dish and slacks her substrate. Should I just take out the water dish and soak a corner of the substrate so she can drink. I know it's a desert species and gets water from food mostly....but I'm not to sure what to do
 

shutout2000

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I have used cotton balls. Just fill them up with water, and they hold in the water great. No mess or anything like that.
 

The Grym Reaper

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My Arizona blond keeps knocking over her water dish and slacks her substrate. Should I just take out the water dish and soak a corner of the substrate so she can drink. I know it's a desert species and gets water from food mostly....but I'm not to sure what to do
I usually part bury mine so my only problems are them being dug up or filled with substrate.

Can't remember whose idea it was but you can cut a bit of plastic so that it's a bit wider than the water dish and hot glue it to the bottom of the water dish, you then hot glue a small/flat stone to the bottom side of the plastic to weigh it down which makes it much harder to flip, made a quick bodge job/mock up to illustrate.

DSC00001.JPG DSC00002.JPG
 
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Ungoliant

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Should I just take out the water dish and soak a corner of the substrate so she can drink.
IMO, it should always have a water dish.

A bigger dish is harder to flip (though they may still fill it in or drop nasty boluses in it).
 

Paiige

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I have used cotton balls. Just fill them up with water, and they hold in the water great. No mess or anything like that.
I wouldn't use cotton balls - they probably get the job done but I'd imagine are along the same lines as sponges in terms of mold growth and being good breeding grounds for bacteria/little critters/whatever else
 

PanzoN88

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Water dish is a must. My E. Sp. Red (female) constantly buries her water dish so I just dig it up and add more water. It may get annoying at times but that is what you have to do at some point when raising tarantulas.
 

shutout2000

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I wouldn't use cotton balls - they probably get the job done but I'd imagine are along the same lines as sponges in terms of mold growth and being good breeding grounds for bacteria/little critters/whatever else
That's true, forgot to point that out. However I changed mine about every 2 weeks before I noticed mold growth.
 

viper69

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That's true, forgot to point that out. However I changed mine about every 2 weeks before I noticed mold growth.
Which means you have mold on the balls before you actually change it. It's like getting sick with a cold virus. by the time you have symptoms, you've been infected long before you had symptoms.

Not to mention that such materials are great for growing bacteria as they provide a structure for the bacteria to adhere too.
 

viper69

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aurusantula

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I have a water dish that is as big as my A. chalcodes (she's about the size of my palm), and usually I just move the water dish to a different part of her enclosure when she starts digging near it to the point where it tips.
 

cold blood

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My Arizona blond keeps knocking over her water dish and slacks her substrate. Should I just take out the water dish and soak a corner of the substrate so she can drink. I know it's a desert species and gets water from food mostly....but I'm not to sure what to do
You could do just that. It needs a water dish, but it can go a few days without one, its not going to hurt anything and its not a terrible idea as you want the sub to remain dry.

You could also add another water dish, or a larger, deeper one. Or just change the location to let the areas dry out.

I do just what you suggested though, I just leave the dry, buried dish there, and pull and replace it in a day or three when the area has dried.

A little damp area wont hurt anything, and neither will not having a dish for a few days.
 

viper69

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Which means you have mold on the balls before you actually change it. It's like getting sick with a cold virus. by the time you have symptoms, you've been infected long before you had symptoms.

Not to mention that such materials are great for growing bacteria as they provide a structure for the bacteria to adhere too.

@shutout2000 What do you disagree with?
 

shutout2000

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Which means you have mold on the balls before you actually change it. It's like getting sick with a cold virus. by the time you have symptoms, you've been infected long before you had symptoms.

Not to mention that such materials are great for growing bacteria as they provide a structure for the bacteria to adhere too.
Incorrect! Mold growth had not started within the 2 weeks. That's why I took it out when I did. In order for it to mold it has to be introduced to something else, aside from the cotton such as perhaps some loose substrate. Done it for many years, with all sorts of my critters. Never had issues!
 

viper69

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Incorrect! Mold growth had not started within the 2 weeks. That's why I took it out when I did. In order for it to mold it has to be introduced to something else, aside from the cotton such as perhaps some loose substrate. Done it for many years, with all sorts of my critters. Never had issues!
Mold is already present on a surface before a person notices it. Fungal spores are everywhere, like in the air hah. Or can you see those too? :watchingyou::wideyed:
 

Trenor

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I think getting a dish you can bury in the sub to prevent flipping will help. I use condiment cups with my larger Ts and bury them flush with the top of the substrate. If the T flips the water dish a lot and if gets too wet I usually just let the substrate dry out some before I fill it up again. You don't want the substrate to be a swamp just so you feel better because the T has water in the dish.

I usually part bury mine so my only problems are them being dug up or filled with substrate.

Can't remember whose idea it was but you can cut a bit of plastic so that it's a bit wider than the water dish and hot glue it to the bottom of the water dish, you then hot glue a small/flat stone to the bottom side of the plastic to weigh it down which makes it much harder to flip, made a quick bodge job/mock up to illustrate.

View attachment 235039 View attachment 235040
That's a neat idea. I'll have to try it out with some of my smaller enclosures. I think this was the most helpful post so far. :)
 

shutout2000

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Mold is already present on a surface before a person notices it. Fungal spores are everywhere, like in the air hah. Or can you see those too? :watchingyou::wideyed:
Well sir, it appears you have tried to make this post more humorful rather than a fact based reply. So I conclude your probably just immature, and only wish to have fun, rather than a mature dispute over this topic. I may be wrong, so forgive me if I am. Although Imay be wasting my time, I will try to further explain this to you. First, I respect your opinion although you have provided little to no information to the topic. I can as well understand people disagreeing with my post as we are only human and everyone has their own opinion.

Like you said, Mold spores are everywhere, including in what you call, "the air." ( which is why I agreed with your post) In fact mold can grow as quick as 24 hours. However, what keeps everything from molding? Well,it would be several contributing factors, such as, temperature, humidity, and other contaminants. This specific object we are speaking of, a dish, or container with water filled cotton would be all that is present. Well, in order for mold to grow, it needs moisture, which it has! However it also needs nutrients, and cellulose as well to grow. The cotton does not provide either! So, unless if something else is added to the mix, such as perhaps some kicked up substrate, (which is more than possible) or some other item that would provide the key ingredients for mold to grow, it would not occur.

Like I said, it would more than likely, eventually grow mold, due to the fact, whatever arachnid you may have in there will either end up kicking substrate in it, or loose something off of itself while drinking. However, Mold can't just "grow" in a water and cotton filled dish. Not looking to cause issues between us. :) You have a good day!

Sources: Studied Biology
 
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viper69

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Well sir, it appears you have tried to make this post more humorful rather than a fact based reply. So I conclude your probably just immature, and only wish to have fun, rather than a mature dispute over this topic. Although I am more than likely, wasting my time, I will try to further explain this to you. First, I respect your opinion although you have provided little to no information to the topic. I can as well understand people disagreeing with my post as we are only human and everyone has their own opinion.

Like you said, Mold spores are everywhere, including in what you call, "the air." ( which is why I agreed with your post) In fact mold can grow as quick as 24 hours. However, what keeps everything from molding? Well,it would be several contributing factors, such as, temperature, humidity, and other contaminants. This specific object we are speaking of, a dish, or container with water filled cotton would be all that is present. Well, in order for mold to grow, it needs moisture, which it has! However it also needs nutrients, and cellulose as well to grow. The cotton does not provide either! So, unless if something else is added to the mix, such as perhaps some kicked up substrate, (which is more than possible) or some other item that would provide the key ingredients for mold to grow, it would not occur.

Like I said, it would more than likely, eventually grow mold, due to the fact, whatever arachnid you may have in there will either end up kicking substrate in it, or loose something off of itself while drinking. However, Mold can't just "grow" in a water and cotton filled dish. Not looking to cause issues between us. :) You have a good day!

Sources: Studied Biology
I'm going to explain a few things to help you better understand, as well as address our mold.

1. I have purposely injected humor, why? Because far too many MORONIC PRIMATES have read my often blunt/direct responses as personal attacks or some other ridiculous sentiment beyond what my responses were intended or written as. People read text and INFER tone when there is none in the written word. Example>> You are smart.>> Can one tell if I mean that in a good way, sarcastic way, No and No.

Do they take a moment and ask me directly what the meaning is behind my words, that's too logical. Most just become a keyboard warrior and flame one.

SO I use humor as a means of hoping to prevent another primate from going off the deep end and hitting the report button, or worse.

I also use humor at times to make a point.

I'm glad you don't appear to be the type of primate I have previously encountered here at times. =)

2.

No information: You have not provided any more information than I have actually. In point of fact, neither of us have cited primary literature to prove our statements. Including the one I quoted from you above.

"what I call the air".... actually everyone on the planet calls the atmosphere around us "the air", let's not single out that word as something odd/unusual etc.

I agree with you regarding mold needing moisture, and nutrients.

However, your statement of cotton not being a nutrient source for mold is factually WRONG.

I have provided some links for you to read. They are from scientific organizations/health organizations etc.

I understand someone may not believe another person, so I'm providing some educational material for you in hopes that you will see that what I stated earlier isn't "my opinion", but fact-based statements that I made, based on common, scientific knowledge.

I'm not in the business of providing links and such for people. However considering you study biology, I'd like to think you would be interested in reading them to increase your knowledge base, and by extension improve the husbandry for your animals.

The fact you study biology and do not know that fungus can virtually grow on anything that is organic, including cotton, I find surprising. Fungi are a vital portion of the ecosystem, right along w/bacteria.

By the way, your "Sources: Studied Biology" is not a source. It's text on a web page.


What does mold need to grow?
Molds thrive on organic materials like natural fibers (cotton, wool), paper"

Link here>> https://web.extension.illinois.edu/healthyair/mold.cfm

Below is a good one too.

http://epi.publichealth.nc.gov/oee/mold/grow.html


Here's another one for you

http://www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/consumer/buildings/basics/moldgrowth.htm

"Mold Food. If all three other requirements are met, almost any substance that contains carbon atoms (organic substance) will provide sufficient nutrients to support mold growth. Even the oil from your skin that is left when you touch an otherwise unsuitable surface, like stainless steel, or the soap residue left from a good cleaning will provide sufficient nutrients to support the growth of some molds. And many of the most common materials found in homes like wood, paper and organic fibers are among the most preferred of mold nutrients. Thus, eliminating mold food from your environment is a virtually impossible task."
 
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shutout2000

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Well as for your comment asking if I could see the mold spores, surely you didn't think I believed it was possible? That, I assumed was sarcasm, and I perhaps may have mistaken you for someone your not. I have been on this forum for a while now, and I have encountered many posts, and people, who I suppose I could say, we're just not very nice. I think I jumped the gun and assumed you were one of them. As for the comment on whether I am a "moronic primate" or not. I can assure you I'm not and , I don't wish to cause no issues with anyone. More so, just looking to have an intelligent conversation, which of I can agree neither of us have been exactly "citing" our sources. Also take note, technically, the fact I studIED, biology can be used as a source. However since no proof was provided I did do so, then I can merely agree that it's probably not the most reliable backup.

Now, back to the mold topic. You should be happy to know I read everyone of those sites you shared,and I thank you for them. However, like I said previosly, Mold will eventually grow on any substance, surface, etc. This as well applies to clothing (cotton) which is why I am sure at some point you have had mold on your clothing, or couch, or something similar. However, the following is my fault as I failed to mention it in my first post.Now, I suppose cotton would provide, enough nutrients, and even the cellulose it needs. However, but to break this down even more so.... Mold requires certain levels of that humidity as well. 60-80% humidity level is considered ideal for mold growth. However, this would be a water filled cotton dish, with the humidity level well over exceeding that level of humidity. So, Mold growth would not occur, and if it did, it would take a significant amount of time. Also, temperature plays a roll in it as well, like I stated. However the temperature was never threw into this equation so, I, nor you can use it to our advantage in this conversation. But just so you are aware, temperatures between, 60 to 80 degrees farenheit, is ideal for mold growth.

Sources:
https://www.cdc.gov/mold/dampness_facts.htm
https://web.extension.illinois.edu/healthyair/mold.cfm
 

Rob1985

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I just clean out the water dish, refill it and repeat. It's just what T's do and I have learned to accept that some of them might require a little extra water dish attention. :D
 

viper69

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Well as for your comment asking if I could see the mold spores, surely you didn't think I believed it was possible? That, I assumed was sarcasm, and I perhaps may have mistaken you for someone your not. I have been on this forum for a while now, and I have encountered many posts, and people, who I suppose I could say, we're just not very nice. I think I jumped the gun and assumed you were one of them. As for the comment on whether I am a "moronic primate" or not. I can assure you I'm not and , I don't wish to cause no issues with anyone. More so, just looking to have an intelligent conversation, which of I can agree neither of us have been exactly "citing" our sources. Also take note, technically, the fact I studIED, biology can be used as a source. However since no proof was provided I did do so, then I can merely agree that it's probably not the most reliable backup.

Now, back to the mold topic. You should be happy to know I read everyone of those sites you shared,and I thank you for them. However, like I said previosly, Mold will eventually grow on any substance, surface, etc. This as well applies to clothing (cotton) which is why I am sure at some point you have had mold on your clothing, or couch, or something similar. However, the following is my fault as I failed to mention it in my first post.Now, I suppose cotton would provide, enough nutrients, and even the cellulose it needs. However, but to break this down even more so.... Mold requires certain levels of that humidity as well. 60-80% humidity level is considered ideal for mold growth. However, this would be a water filled cotton dish, with the humidity level well over exceeding that level of humidity. So, Mold growth would not occur, and if it did, it would take a significant amount of time. Also, temperature plays a roll in it as well, like I stated. However the temperature was never threw into this equation so, I, nor you can use it to our advantage in this conversation. But just so you are aware, temperatures between, 60 to 80 degrees farenheit, is ideal for mold growth.

Sources:
https://www.cdc.gov/mold/dampness_facts.htm
https://web.extension.illinois.edu/healthyair/mold.cfm
I'm glad you found some useful info in the links I provided you, nice to see someone who actually reads the info I provide, let alone citing it later.

Text on a web page is not reliable in the context you and I speaking of. Maybe I'm a Donald Trump, or a Noble Prize Winner, either way, neither can be proved to be true or false.

Well of course cotton provides the nutrients required for mold, that information was provided in the links I provided. There is no "suppose" on those, this is not a hypothesis that requires investigation, no need to reinvent the wheel on this scientific fact.

So based on your statements above, it supports my thoughts that you and any other person who the laws of nature apply, might have mold on cotton balls.
 
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