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Are Atlas moths legal in US?

Discussion in 'Insects, Other Invertebrates & Arthropods' started by Schledog, Feb 7, 2019.

  1. Schledog

    Schledog Arachnosquire

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    So I would like to get a group of atlas moths so I can use them for my bug shows at schools
    (also I would like to keep them as pets, duh) and I couldn't find any for sale in the US. I found some native moths for sale but no atlas moths. Are they illegal in the US?
     
  2. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnoprince

    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2019
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  3. MasterOogway

    MasterOogway Arachnoknight Active Member

    They are not; they are a regulated plant pest by USDA/APHIS. Search their latin binomial here: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/planthealth/import-information/rppl/rppl-table

    Always be aware, just because you can buy something, doesn't make it legal. Tons of inverts are technically illegal but are sold all the time. Walking sticks, most/many non-native mantids, and plenty of others are illegal under the USDA/APHIS plant pest list.
     
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  4. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    Generally if it eats live plants and is not US native it’s a big no-no. Stick insects, cockroaches, snails, and so on are all out of the question.
     
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  5. Chris LXXIX

    Chris LXXIX ArachnoGod Active Member

    . . :lock:
     
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  6. Greasylake

    Greasylake Arachnoprince

    Nothing to see here ;)
     
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  7. The Snark

    The Snark هرج و مرج مهندس Old Timer

    The primary predators of the Atlas Moth are various Nephila species along with certain bats and night hunting birds that are endemic to the tropics.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. The Mantis Menagerie

    The Mantis Menagerie Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    They are illegal without a PPQ 526 permit. To obtain the permit for A. atlas, you would need a containment facility. This can be a room in your house that is inspected by APHIS and meets certain standards for preventing the dissemination of plant pests.
    https://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_he...thropod_biocontrol_containment_guidelines.pdf
    While phasmids and snails are highly regulated and require containment facilities, the permits for many species of cockroaches are actually quite easy to obtain.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  9. Schledog

    Schledog Arachnosquire

    Alright thank you all. I'm probably just going to stick with polyphemus moths then. They are pretty cool, although an atlas moth is cooler. Maybe Ill try to get permits sometime when I'm older.
     
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  10. NathanJBoob

    NathanJBoob Arachnosquire

    USA
    0508182353_Burst01.jpg 0523182234b.jpg FB_IMG_1518235027851.jpg _DSC8348.JPG 0817180404.jpg 0517182124c.jpg 0919171908.jpg 0518171735.jpg 0916172233.jpg _DSC4873.JPG 0508182353_Burst01.jpg 0523182234b.jpg FB_IMG_1518235027851.jpg _DSC8348.JPG 0817180404.jpg 0517182124c.jpg 0919171908.jpg
    There are a fair number of really interesting Saturniids within our boarders! I have been rearing them for over 20 years now and I never get tired of seeing a nice batch of Spring form lunas or big fat cecropias!! There are even some cool color morphs becoming available!
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
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  11. The Mantis Menagerie

    The Mantis Menagerie Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    You beat me to pointing out Citheronia regalis! It is my favorite North American lepidopteran.
    Where can I get a neon orange luna moth?
     
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  12. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    Holy crap did you do all of that?! That’s amazing! Tisa shame that they only live for a couple of weeks...are the darker individuals tenerals/freshly emerged?
     
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  13. NathanJBoob

    NathanJBoob Arachnosquire

    USA
    0522180021.jpg 0509182329b.jpg 0508182334.jpg 0508182358a.jpg 0507182249a.jpg 0508182355a.jpg
    I've never seen a luna like the one you described! I've been selective breeding them for the pink expression in the Spring form and large eyespots. Here were a few of my breeders from last April.
     
  14. NathanJBoob

    NathanJBoob Arachnosquire

    USA
    Yes that's just a small bit of what I'm doing with these big moths! Which photo are you referring to about the freshly emerged ones?
     
  15. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    The cecropia and polyphemus moths :)
     
  16. NathanJBoob

    NathanJBoob Arachnosquire

    USA
    The dark polyphemus in that photo are an extremely rare color morph that exists in the wild. It is controlled by a recessive gene. I stumbled upon it about 8 years ago and have maintained it to the present.

    The light, yellowish cecropia are a new morph I call golden. It is also a naturally occurring color morph and very rare. A friend collected a cocoon that produced a female a few years back. He paired her with a wild male and three of their offspring were goldens. The progeny from the sibling golden pairing produced all goldens.
     
  17. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    You’re absolutely kidding me, that’s just unbelievably amazing. Well, guess I found another hobby! Sorry for derailing the topic but where do you find wild cocoons for any silk moth species?
     
  18. The Mantis Menagerie

    The Mantis Menagerie Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    I was joking about a neon orange color morph (although it would be amazing).
    I would love to have different color morphs in a giant silkmoth colony, but I first have to find the regular ones. So far, I have only ever found a couple of cocoons. I recently learned of a new place in my area that has large populations of luna moths, and I was told how to find the larvae. Do you have any tips for finding species in the Ceratocampinae subfamily? I know they pupate underground, but I have yet to find any larvae (except Anisota sp).
    How do you supply enough fresh hardwood leaves to your larvae? The leaves quickly dry when I harvest branches despite me putting them in a jar of water. How can the leaves be kept fresh?
     
  19. NathanJBoob

    NathanJBoob Arachnosquire

    USA
    The best places to find cocoons in the wild is along the edges of woods, like where they meet an open field. Fence rows and along roads where oak, cherry and sassafrass are growing are good spots as well. Species that spin on the ground or have cocoons that end up on the ground are very hard to find.
     
  20. The Mantis Menagerie

    The Mantis Menagerie Arachnoknight Active Member

    USA
    Ha! Lepidoptera were the first insects I kept and introduced me to the hobby, and I have been wanting to breed saturniids ever since I started. I am actually thinking about trying to find some today luna moths at that new location I learned about.
     
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