Arboreal T suggestions?

hennibbale

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 30, 2016
Messages
80
So, as I recently lost my A. Avicularia I want to put that empty terrarium to use.
It's sized 20x20x30 cm (8x8x11 in).

I don't have much experience in the hobby.
What arboreal species should I get?
 

Poec54

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Mar 26, 2013
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You should wait. The non-Avic arboreals are much faster, prone to running out of cages, and most have stronger venom. Get the basics down with slower-moving NW terrestrials first, and after you have that foundation, try some of the more high stung NW terrestrials. This is for the benefit of both you and the spider. This hobby is about patience, not instant gratification.
 

MsBuzzKill

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Jul 23, 2014
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12
If you don't want to get another Avicularia, I suggest an Iridopelma hirsutum. Fairly hardy NW arboreal species. Can have a bit of attitude (they think they are little Poecilotheria) and they can be a bit fast (of course, so can Avics), but IMHO nothing to be overly concerned about re: bites, potency.
 

hennibbale

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Jun 30, 2016
Messages
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If you don't want to get another Avicularia, I suggest an Iridopelma hirsutum. Fairly hardy NW arboreal species. Can have a bit of attitude (they think they are little Poecilotheria) and they can be a bit fast (of course, so can Avics), but IMHO nothing to be overly concerned about re: bites, potency.
It seems cool. I'll check it out.
 

viper69

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You should wait and learn more about tarantulas with a terrestrial species, like G. pulchripes.

I would not recommend an Iridopelma at all for you.

I don't know what happened to your Avic, but disposition wise they are the best arboreal to own (except of A. laeta and A. diversipes). Any other arboreal genus is faster (including Iridopelma), or more defensive (including Iridopelma), or the venom is more potent, neither of which you need given your lack of experience.
 
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Poec54

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If you don't want to get another Avicularia, I suggest an Iridopelma hirsutum. Fairly hardy NW arboreal species. Can have a bit of attitude (they think they are little Poecilotheria) and they can be a bit fast (of course, so can Avics), but IMHO nothing to be overly concerned about re: bites, potency.

This is poor advice for a beginner: a defensive arboreal. How about a better suggestion?
 

Matabuey

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96
This is poor advice for a beginner: a defensive arboreal. How about a better suggestion?
Does it not depend on how comfortable she is with speed?

I've only ever owned old worlds. Never owned a new world species, except for P.irminia
 

Chris LXXIX

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5,825
This is poor advice for a beginner: a defensive arboreal. How about a better suggestion?
Doesn't exist a better suggestion if 'Avics' are too hard/delicate/or what else to care for someone one moment and since the "stuffy cages" plus "not enough ventilation" and what else always enter in the discussion.

Tell me... if 'Avics' are a no which kind of arboreal remain, man? The only true non defensive arboreal are the poop snipers Avicularia at the end.

I can't figure out exactly why people keep viewing Psalmopoeus cambridgei as a defensive one, when makes, for someone with the T's basics and know how, a perfect starter arboreal.

Sure the venom is a bit strong but their attitude isn't the high strung one depicted always.
 

obie

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115
If I were you I would go for a C cyaneopubescens or common name green bottle blue or gbb. They will live somewhat like a arboreal tarantula and they're pretty Hardy also.
 

Otis Driftwood

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Aug 7, 2015
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4
Thrixoperma ockerti. I had one a couple years ago. They like to flick hairs but they are hardy and gorgeous T's. Not as fast as Tapinauchenius but still quick.
 

Abyss

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Apr 15, 2016
Messages
281
Im gonna respectfully (VERY respectfully) disagree with any advice to the OP about spending their $ on a terestrial when she wants an arboreal and already has the "stuff" for an arboreal.
1) a terestrial is nothing like an arboreal and has dif requirements so i have never really followed the logic in keeping terestrials first when (IMO) arboreals are just as easy to keep, they just have dif requirements.
2) the OP wants an arboreal not a terestrial so asking them (or trying to convince them) to spend their hard earned $ on something they dont want and possibly will not be satisfied with is simply none of our business IMO.
3) i think its always best to advise/instruct/teach folks about the species they actually want rather then continually directing them to species they don't want.

All that said, to those advising a "starter" terrestrial, i get it, i understand why, i agree with the logic (to a point) and in a perfect world, all keepers would buy a rosie first and magically learn all they need to know about T's an be happy about a brown pet rock (lol).

Issue is, for most ppl (myself included) there is simply no way ever that anyone is gonna get me to invest in a T i dont want (and a T is potentially a long term investment and/or then we have the hassel of trying to sell/trade away a T no one else wants either).
Your asking someone to buy a T that you thinks is best, and do it the way you want, researh the way you want, ask questions the way you want etc rather then just "coaching" them and helping them with the T they actually want to best care for it.

This is all my opinion but theres "beginner" arboreals too. Everyone wanting an arboreal doesnt have to start with a terestrial. Theres no law that says so. I really feel like we as a community need to stop trying to discourage ppl from the T's they want (its off putting when someone like the OP asks about an arboreal and within the first few comments, the question that needs answered is ignored an the convo diverts into what they should/shouldnt buy). Alternatively, i think we need to encourage them to do their homework and ask the rite questions an gather the rite info so they (even as beginner keepers) can bypass wasting $ an time on T's they dont actually want or care about.

Im telling you from experience that any T can be well kept an cared for by any beginner keeper if we help them an teach them.
By shear ignorance my 1st T was an OBT that i got as a kid an handled every chance i got (i was young an simply did not know any better). But me an the T made it through safetly an if a child can pull that off with the most minimum of knowledge/experience and doing TONS of things wrong then i have to believe that with the proper instruction/information theres really no valid reason we should expect ppl to buy T's we want them to have rather then what they want to have.

~end rant lol
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
14,308
Im gonna respectfully (VERY respectfully) disagree with any advice to the OP about spending their $ on a terestrial when she wants an arboreal and already has the "stuff" for an arboreal.
1) a terestrial is nothing like an arboreal and has dif requirements so i have never really followed the logic in keeping terestrials first when (IMO) arboreals are just as easy to keep, they just have dif requirements.
2) the OP wants an arboreal not a terestrial so asking them (or trying to convince them) to spend their hard earned $ on something they dont want and possibly will not be satisfied with is simply none of our business IMO.
3) i think its always best to advise/instruct/teach folks about the species they actually want rather then continually directing them to species they don't want.

All that said, to those advising a "starter" terrestrial, i get it, i understand why, i agree with the logic (to a point) and in a perfect world, all keepers would buy a rosie first and magically learn all they need to know about T's an be happy about a brown pet rock (lol).

Issue is, for most ppl (myself included) there is simply no way ever that anyone is gonna get me to invest in a T i dont want (and a T is potentially a long term investment and/or then we have the hassel of trying to sell/trade away a T no one else wants either).
Your asking someone to buy a T that you thinks is best, and do it the way you want, researh the way you want, ask questions the way you want etc rather then just "coaching" them and helping them with the T they actually want to best care for it.

This is all my opinion but theres "beginner" arboreals too. Everyone wanting an arboreal doesnt have to start with a terestrial. Theres no law that says so. I really feel like we as a community need to stop trying to discourage ppl from the T's they want (its off putting when someone like the OP asks about an arboreal and within the first few comments, the question that needs answered is ignored an the convo diverts into what they should/shouldnt buy). Alternatively, i think we need to encourage them to do their homework and ask the rite questions an gather the rite info so they (even as beginner keepers) can bypass wasting $ an time on T's they dont actually want or care about.

Im telling you from experience that any T can be well kept an cared for by any beginner keeper if we help them an teach them.
By shear ignorance my 1st T was an OBT that i got as a kid an handled every chance i got (i was young an simply did not know any better). But me an the T made it through safetly an if a child can pull that off with the most minimum of knowledge/experience and doing TONS of things wrong then i have to believe that with the proper instruction/information theres really no valid reason we should expect ppl to buy T's we want them to have rather then what they want to have.

~end rant lol
In principle I agree with many of the things you wrote, you have a cogent piece of writing; in practice what is observed on the forum is tons of "Help my Dying/Dead Avic" thread more frequently I think than any other genus.

For some people they are quick and dedicated learners of T husbandry, others are average, and others shouldn't even own a plant, let alone a T.

In the absence of knowing just where the prospective owner is on the "dedication" spectrum (whatever one may call it), I always go towards NW terrestrial over NW arboreal. The former is inherently easier to deal with than the latter IMO.

I'm not saying you are wrong, we just differ in the approach.

I agree they should be educated, in the end it doesn't matter what anyone writes, that person has the ability to buy whatever they want.
 

Steelo Johnson

Arachnado
Joined
Jan 31, 2016
Messages
35
I didn't really see OP mentioning avics being out of the question (could be wrong). Did you lose it due to difficulty and it died or did it actually get loose? If avics are fine I would recommend a versicolor.
 

Matabuey

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 9, 2016
Messages
96
Im gonna respectfully (VERY respectfully) disagree with any advice to the OP about spending their $ on a terestrial when she wants an arboreal and already has the "stuff" for an arboreal.
1) a terestrial is nothing like an arboreal and has dif requirements so i have never really followed the logic in keeping terestrials first when (IMO) arboreals are just as easy to keep, they just have dif requirements.
2) the OP wants an arboreal not a terestrial so asking them (or trying to convince them) to spend their hard earned $ on something they dont want and possibly will not be satisfied with is simply none of our business IMO.
3) i think its always best to advise/instruct/teach folks about the species they actually want rather then continually directing them to species they don't want.

All that said, to those advising a "starter" terrestrial, i get it, i understand why, i agree with the logic (to a point) and in a perfect world, all keepers would buy a rosie first and magically learn all they need to know about T's an be happy about a brown pet rock (lol).

Issue is, for most ppl (myself included) there is simply no way ever that anyone is gonna get me to invest in a T i dont want (and a T is potentially a long term investment and/or then we have the hassel of trying to sell/trade away a T no one else wants either).
Your asking someone to buy a T that you thinks is best, and do it the way you want, researh the way you want, ask questions the way you want etc rather then just "coaching" them and helping them with the T they actually want to best care for it.

This is all my opinion but theres "beginner" arboreals too. Everyone wanting an arboreal doesnt have to start with a terestrial. Theres no law that says so. I really feel like we as a community need to stop trying to discourage ppl from the T's they want (its off putting when someone like the OP asks about an arboreal and within the first few comments, the question that needs answered is ignored an the convo diverts into what they should/shouldnt buy). Alternatively, i think we need to encourage them to do their homework and ask the rite questions an gather the rite info so they (even as beginner keepers) can bypass wasting $ an time on T's they dont actually want or care about.

Im telling you from experience that any T can be well kept an cared for by any beginner keeper if we help them an teach them.
By shear ignorance my 1st T was an OBT that i got as a kid an handled every chance i got (i was young an simply did not know any better). But me an the T made it through safetly an if a child can pull that off with the most minimum of knowledge/experience and doing TONS of things wrong then i have to believe that with the proper instruction/information theres really no valid reason we should expect ppl to buy T's we want them to have rather then what they want to have.

~end rant lol
Agreed.

I've done a similar thing in this hobby and reptile keeping.

I started keeping venomous snakes, 7 years ago, without ever having kept a non venomous snake. Even to this day i have yet to touch a non venomous snake. Haven't taken a bite - and arguably i keep one the most testing species, if not the most, in terms of temperament - Bothrops asper.

Recently got into tarantulas. Didn't really bother looking at any New Worlds, except the only two that really take my fancy - P.irmina and Avic's. Went out and bought an irminia, C.fimbriatus, I.mira (sold, too boring lol, not sighting except feed in 6 months), M.balfouri, and O.sp blue Panay.

I think it depends on the person though - like with everything.

Give them all the information they need, pros and cons, and let them make their own decision.
 

Abyss

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
281
In principle I agree with many of the things you wrote, you have a cogent piece of writing; in practice what is observed on the forum is tons of "Help my Dying/Dead Avic" thread more frequently I think than any other genus.

For some people they are quick and dedicated learners of T husbandry, others are average, and others shouldn't even own a plant, let alone a T.

In the absence of knowing just where the prospective owner is on the "dedication" spectrum (whatever one may call it), I always go towards NW terrestrial over NW arboreal. The former is inherently easier to deal with than the latter IMO.

I'm not saying you are wrong, we just differ in the approach.

I agree they should be educated, in the end it doesn't matter what anyone writes, that person has the ability to buy whatever they want.
For sure pal, there is not a true rite/wrong answer here. Its agreeably LARGLY opinion based for sure.
 
Last edited:

Abyss

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 15, 2016
Messages
281
Agreed.

I've done a similar thing in this hobby and reptile keeping.

I started keeping venomous snakes, 7 years ago, without ever having kept a non venomous snake. Even to this day i have yet to touch a non venomous snake. Haven't taken a bite - and arguably i keep one the most testing species, if not the most, in terms of temperament - Bothrops asper.

Recently got into tarantulas. Didn't really bother looking at any New Worlds, except the only two that really take my fancy - P.irmina and Avic's. Went out and bought an irminia, C.fimbriatus, I.mira (sold, too boring lol, not sighting except feed in 6 months), M.balfouri, and O.sp blue Panay.

I think it depends on the person though - like with everything.

Give them all the information they need, pros and cons, and let them make their own decision.
To be fair its ok IMO for those experienced keepers like @Poec54 and @viper69 who strongly advocate "beginner species" to offer that suggestion (they have a VERY valid readon in doing so an its generally sound advice like it or not). My general point was basically to not do so at the expence of bypassing the question at hand. Not at all saying those 2 do that FYI. I just mean generally speaking.
IMO a more encouraging and helpful response would be something like
"To answer you, get another avic and here is how to properly care for it. That said, since your new to the hobby i strongly suggest you try out this T first".
A response like that is ideal to me because it offers a ditect answer to the question weather you agree or not with it and it offeres the sound advice of an alternative T where applicable.
I would never ever advocate getting an advanced species as a first or even a 2nd or 3rd. But if thats what someones heart was set on, i would help them as best i could while offering alternative suggestions
 

hennibbale

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 30, 2016
Messages
80
I didn't really see OP mentioning avics being out of the question (could be wrong). Did you lose it due to difficulty and it died or did it actually get loose? If avics are fine I would recommend a versicolor.
Totally right.

It died.

And I don't have ZERO experience: I've had an Acanthoscurria Geniculata, a Chromatopelma Cyaneopubescens and a scorpion (H. Petersii) for a while. So I'm not at the "why is it on its back is it dead" level.
 

hennibbale

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Jun 30, 2016
Messages
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(sorry for the message flood)

I don't know what I could've done wrong in keeping my Avicularia.
The temps were ok, the enclosure was* ok, humidity too.
I've had it for 10 days, and then it died.
Didn't web, didn't eat.

*in the opinion of the most
 
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