Arachnids and Inverts that live in cooler climates

Benurmanii

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So, while my main focus is definitely still going to be carnivorous plants, every time I'm on here I get all excited about T's again. However, my main issue now is I don't really have a good spot upstairs for any pets. I keep all my plants in the basement, and it sort of has become my hobby zone. Issue with keeping inverts in the basement is that it gets pretty cold during the winter, I open the windows at night in order to cool things off for my plants. During the winter, ambient basement temps can be in the low to mid 60s, and nights from high 40s to mid 50s. During the summer, it can be more around low 70s during the day, and not much colder at night, temps don't really drop during July-August.

Any critters people keep that would enjoy such temps? Not wanting to push the temp tolerance for anything either, I would want to get something that would be perfectly happy under this climate.
 

BobBarley

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You're going to want to look into native inverts. With temps that low, you'll see natural periods of inactivity (diapause) with pretty much all of the native species during the winter. Try some northern Aphonopelma iodius specimens (other native Aphonopelma can work too, but you don't want to push their tolerance too much) as iodius is the most cold tolerant sp. I know of. I've read of it being found in places that regularly receive lots of snow during the winter. However, keep in mind that underground, the temps are warmer than above ground. If possible, a little more warmth would be beneficial, just in case.
 

Benurmanii

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If I keep the enclosures more directly under my lights, they will experience warmer day temps. Are there not many species of tropical mountainous (highland) spiders that are in captivity?

I am curious about the case of scorpions. I know there are some scorpions that live in eastern Oregon (I live in Portland), and it gets pretty damn cold there.
 
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pannaking22

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Megaphobema mesomelas comes to mind for a highland tarantula species, but it's still pretty uncommon in the hobby and rather expensive. Tenebrionids would be an easy one to keep and they're pretty much indestructible, especially if you catch some from your area. I'd be curious about the scorps as well.
 

Benurmanii

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I'm definitely interested in M. mesomelas, but I am having trouble finding info on its natural habitat. I'm still a bit concerned about low night temps.
 

user 666

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You're going to want to look into native inverts. With temps that low, you'll see natural periods of inactivity (diapause) with pretty much all of the native species during the winter. Try some northern Aphonopelma iodius specimens (other native Aphonopelma can work too, but you don't want to push their tolerance too much) as iodius is the most cold tolerant sp. I know of. I've read of it being found in places that regularly receive lots of snow during the winter. However, keep in mind that underground, the temps are warmer than above ground. If possible, a little more warmth would be beneficial, just in case.
There's an Aphonopelma species native to Missouri which can survive several feet of snow and freezing temps each winter. I think it is A hentzi but I don't know that anyone ha confirmed that.
 

basin79

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I'm definitely interested in M. mesomelas, but I am having trouble finding info on its natural habitat. I'm still a bit concerned about low night temps.
I keep my girl on moist/wet substrate and around 65f.
 

Benurmanii

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I keep my girl on moist/wet substrate and around 65f.
After doing a bit of digging, it seems that the genus Megaphobema tend to live in cooler climates, or at least their burrows are cooler. I will do some more digging, but I'm already getting pretty interested in the genus, so if it seems feasible, I may try out M. robustum, since it seems to be much more available compared to the other species in the genus. I was reading that somebody kept their M. robust with 55 °F nights, which is right around my range for the majority of the year.
 

basin79

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After doing a bit of digging, it seems that the genus Megaphobema tend to live in cooler climates, or at least their burrows are cooler. I will do some more digging, but I'm already getting pretty interested in the genus, so if it seems feasible, I may try out M. robustum, since it seems to be much more available compared to the other species in the genus. I was reading that somebody kept their M. robust with 55 °F nights, which is right around my range for the majority of the year.
My lass must get 60f during the night maybe even a bit less. It does seem odd to me seeing a stunning T in a cool set up. I just immediately think she'd need 80f. There's something that screams tropical temps. Much like tiger salamanders. They look like they'd need it warm.
 

RTTB

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As far as US native scorpions, it seems that P.boreus and U. mordax are quite cold tolerant.
 

Andy00

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I've read that c vittatus striped bark scorpions are able to survive in freezing temps.
 

rayne64

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Sep 16, 2014
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you could try heat mats under the enclosure as well you can get seedling mats that keep the soil temps a little higher or lizard basking mats they attach to the glass. then use a soil thermometer to monitor soil temps that way the room can get a bit cold but theyd be insulated in their burrow
 
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