Approximately what size does does a Lasiodora parahybana get his hooks and bulbs?

aprilmayjunebugs

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Ugh, I feel like I should know this by now. My most educated guess is around 7". Mine is 6" now and in premolt, I suspect he will molt in 2-4 weeks and put on a half inch as usual.
I was planning on just riding it out and not asking, but I'm starting to fret a little about how much time I have left to enjoy his presence. Any insight or personal experience is greatly appreciated.
 

Neonblizzard

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That's not easy to say because they hook out when they are mature, not when they hit size X.

Mine might only grow to 7 inches, but the next guy's might only hit 6.5 inches, yours might reach 8...

Same reason age isn't a clear cut indicator, maybe just enjoy all the time you have with them and wait and see. You could fret now then they end up living another 2 years and you got worried for no reason
 

vicareux

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Yeah, an example of this is that my N.chromatus matured at 4 inches, while a friend's chromatus matured at 6. So its just the luck of the roll i guess
 

Crazyarachnoguy

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Every species has x amount of molts before it matures. For example one species may take 37 molts before maturity, and the next species may be 16 molts. The number of molts to maturity for a particular species will never change, but size will. So nobody can answer your question. Could be 4”, could be 7”, several diffierent factors play a roll in size.
 

AmbushArachnids

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Every species has x amount of molts before it matures. For example one species may take 37 molts before maturity, and the next species may be 16 molts. The number of molts to maturity for a particular species will never change, but size will. So nobody can answer your question. Could be 4”, could be 7”, several diffierent factors play a roll in size.
I always thought that and would agree however I have sac mates that have matured a few molts ahead of others.
 

Crazyarachnoguy

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I always thought that and would agree however I have sac mates that have matured a few molts ahead of others.
Maybe the molt was destroyed by the t? I think it’s extremely hard to keep track of every molt. Especially starting from first instar to adult. I know this is a fact and not just a theory though, I wish I had some evidence to provide but I do not.
 
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AmbushArachnids

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Maybe the molt was destroyed by the t?
No. Impossible. Not hard at all to track. From what I’ve researched on here there’s reports of males maturity may vary by 2-3 molts for some species of males.

I have 2 male P. rufilata. 3 females. All molt on the same schedule within a few days and are tracked on paper. One matured small at 5” max and another male is still growing. I expected him to mature but has gone another cycle. If he matures he will be one molt off and estimate him being 6.5” mature
 
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Crazyarachnoguy

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No. Impossible. Not hard at all to track. From what I’ve researched on here there’s reports of males maturity may vary by 2-3 molts for some species of males.

I have 2 male P. rufilata. 3 females. All molt on the same schedule within a few days and are tracked on paper. One matured small at 5” max and another male is still growing. I expected him to mature but has gone another cycle. If he matures he will be one molt off and estimate him being 6.5” mature
Ah okay, I’ve never heard of this before but anything is possible. I think it’s allot easier said than done tho, otherwise we would have molt counts for every species.
 

AmbushArachnids

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Ah okay, I’ve never heard of this before but anything is possible. I think it’s allot easier said than done tho, otherwise we would have molt counts for every species.
If you run a search there’s information you can find on the subject. I believe there’s some scientific paper done showing it’s variable as well. All it takes is one time for a variable to show and that tells you it’s not a set number of molts. Nature isn’t extremely rigid.

Molt record keeping is extremely easy and fun. It doesn’t take a trained eye to tell your spider has molted and it doesn’t take much effort to write it down. I just have a massive endless list so there’s no looking up a specific spider or running out of space on one page. If a bodybuilder can track calories we can track molts.
 
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