Aphonopelma sp. diamondback (Veracruz?)

Duke1907

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I ordered my first Aphonopelma sp. It's 1/4' or so diamondback. Not a lot of info on this sp. I checked on here but but mostly stuff for chalcodes, hentzi etc.
I'm assuming the care is much the same as any Aphonopelma sling? Moist sub, hide. Any tips? Should I keep the sub dry, or only moisten a portion of it?
TIA.
 
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The Grym Reaper

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Same care as pretty much any other NW terrestrial sling. For slings that size I just use a 2oz or 4oz condiment cup filled with slightly moist sub (I moisten just under half the sub), starter burrow, and a small clump of damp moss which doubles as a hide/drinking source.

sling enclosure1.png
 

Smotzer

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Care is the same for other NW terrestrials and like the other Aphonopelma species you mentioned.
 

AphonopelmaTX

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As a matter of fact I do. :)

The Diamondbacks should be considered obligate burrowers. They should be given enough space to dig, but given too much space they will dig deep and get lost in the substrate. In a small shallow container they will be constantly moving dirt around and become difficult to feed and water. If they can't dig, expect them to make attempts to run up and out of their enclosure.

They are very skittish which will make feeding a bit of a challenge. Feeding spiderlings half of a mealworm is best since they will be very nervous when their container is opened and will take time to settle down and take down a small cricket or roach. Overall, they are very aggressive feeders and hungry all the time, but watching them run away from a small cricket can be distressing. Since they are hungry all the time, care to not overfeed should be taken. They will easily make themselves super fat since their appetite is greater than their metabolism. They molt about once a year as spiderlings and adults.

Even as spiderlings, they can be kept fairly dry. When mine were tiny spiderlings I gave them water by using an eye dropper to soak the substrate then let it dry out completely. As larger juveniles and adults, I continue to add water to the substrate and let it dry out completely, but add a water dish.

All in all, the Diamondbacks should not be considered a docile species. They are not biters, but they are a very nervous and skittish species capable of short bursts of speed. Keep your eyes on them at all times.
 
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Matt Man

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As a matter of fact I do. :)

The Diamondbacks should be considered obligate burrowers. They should be given enough space to dig, but given too much space they will dig deep and get lost in the substrate. In a small shallow container they will be constantly moving dirt around and become difficult to feed and water. If they can't dig, expect them to make attempts to run up and out of their enclosure.

They are very skittish which will make feeding a bit of a challenge. Feeding spiderlings half of a mealworm is best since they will be very nervous when their container is opened and will take time to settle down and take down a small cricket or roach. Overall, they are very aggressive feeders and hungry all the time, but watching them run away from a small cricket can be distressing. Since they are hungry all the time, care to not overfeed should be taken. They will easily make themselves super fat since their appetite is greater than their metabolism. They molt about once a year as spiderlings and adults.

Even as spiderlings, they can be kept fairly dry. When mine were tiny spiderlings I gave them water by using an eye dropper to soak the substrate then let it dry out completely. As larger juveniles and adults, I continue to add water to the substrate and let it dry out completely, but add a water dish.

All in all, the Diamondbacks should not be considered a docile species. They are not biters, but they are a very nervous and skittish species capable of short bursts of speed. Keep your eyes on them at all times.
I would concur with the skittishness and the rest of this posting. Well summed
 

Duke1907

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As a matter of fact I do. :)

The Diamondbacks should be considered obligate burrowers. They should be given enough space to dig, but given too much space they will dig deep and get lost in the substrate. In a small shallow container they will be constantly moving dirt around and become difficult to feed and water. If they can't dig, expect them to make attempts to run up and out of their enclosure.

They are very skittish which will make feeding a bit of a challenge. Feeding spiderlings half of a mealworm is best since they will be very nervous when their container is opened and will take time to settle down and take down a small cricket or roach. Overall, they are very aggressive feeders and hungry all the time, but watching them run away from a small cricket can be distressing. Since they are hungry all the time, care to not overfeed should be taken. They will easily make themselves super fat since their appetite is greater than their metabolism. They molt about once a year as spiderlings and adults.

Even as spiderlings, they can be kept fairly dry. When mine were tiny spiderlings I gave them water by using an eye dropper to soak the substrate then let it dry out completely. As larger juveniles and adults, I continue to add water to the substrate and let it dry out completely, but add a water dish.

All in all, the Diamondbacks should not be considered a docile species. They are not biters, but they are a very nervous and skittish species capable of short bursts of speed. Keep your eyes on them at all times.
Wow. Thank you sir!

I was planning on putting in a 4 oz portion cup with small cork hide, moist creature soil at the bottom and about 1 1/5" topsoil (dry) on top with a small ink cup water dish, some sphagnum moss. Think that'll be a good set up? Or would that be too damp overall? Should I just go with the pipette thing and drop some water in once in a while and forego the creature soil?
 
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viper69

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but given too much space they will dig deep and get lost in the substrate

why do you think that happens? I think of the wild (and I don't know their habitat), but they can dig as much as they are able to, right? Clearly there's some knowledge I'm lacking this.
 

Matt Man

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why do you think that happens? I think of the wild (and I don't know their habitat), but they can dig as much as they are able to, right? Clearly there's some knowledge I'm lacking this.
I am guessing their natural dirt holds shape better than what we give them. My bicoloratum is a digger as well
 

AphonopelmaTX

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Wow. Thank you sir!

I was planning on putting in a 4 oz portion cup with small cork hide, moist creature soil at the bottom and about 1 1/5" topsoil (dry) on top with a small ink cup water dish, some sphagnum moss. Think that'll be a good set up? Or would that be too damp overall? Should I just go with the pipette thing and drop some water in once in a while and forego the creature soil?
What you describe isn't bad, just overkill. The Diamondbacks, along with all species of Aphonopelma, are really easy to setup and care for. All you need is your 4 oz. portion cup filled about half way with damp topsoil (I don't know what "creature soil" is) and that's it. The spiderling will take care of its own shelter by constructing a burrow and you just give it water when the soil dries out by using an eye dropper to soak the soil or use a small water bottle with spray nozzle to gently spray a bit of water on the inside. No water dish is necessary until it reaches about an inch in legspan then you can use a bottle cap dug into the substrate for a water dish. Give it about half a small mealworm once every couple of weeks and that's it.

why do you think that happens? I think of the wild (and I don't know their habitat), but they can dig as much as they are able to, right? Clearly there's some knowledge I'm lacking this.
I'm not sure what you are asking about exactly, but I will give it a go anyway. Aphonopelma species are fossorial so the reason they dig as much as they can in captivity is because they are following the instinct of self preservation. An Aphonopelma spiderling, when given too much space in captivity, will burrow down to the bottom of their enclosure, plug up the entrance, and sit there until it is hungry which could be months. Seeing this can be a bit unnerving if one doesn't realize an Aphonopelma spiderling isn't really all that fragile. They are like tiny adults that don't need to fed or looked after often. By observing this in captivity, one can predict that in nature they are digging (or taking up residence in a tiny crack in the soil), plugging it up, and feeding on the soil fauna without ever having to unplug their shelter to reveal themselves.
 

Duke1907

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What you describe isn't bad, just overkill. The Diamondbacks, along with all species of Aphonopelma, are really easy to setup and care for. All you need is your 4 oz. portion cup filled about half way with damp topsoil (I don't know what "creature soil" is) and that's it. The spiderling will take care of its own shelter by constructing a burrow and you just give it water when the soil dries out by using an eye dropper to soak the soil or use a small water bottle with spray nozzle to gently spray a bit of water on the inside. No water dish is necessary until it reaches about an inch in legspan then you can use a bottle cap dug into the substrate for a water dish. Give it about half a small mealworm once every couple of weeks and that's it.



I'm not sure what you are asking about exactly, but I will give it a go anyway. Aphonopelma species are fossorial so the reason they dig as much as they can in captivity is because they are following the instinct of self preservation. An Aphonopelma spiderling, when given too much space in captivity, will burrow down to the bottom of their enclosure, plug up the entrance, and sit there until it is hungry which could be months. Seeing this can be a bit unnerving if one doesn't realize an Aphonopelma spiderling isn't really all that fragile. They are like tiny adults that don't need to fed or looked after often. By observing this in captivity, one can predict that in nature they are digging (or taking up residence in a tiny crack in the soil), plugging it up, and feeding on the soil fauna without ever having to unplug their shelter to reveal themselves.
Great. I will definitely follow your advice. Thank you so much for offering it.
Just an aside...Creature soil is a brand name of moist ..well...creature soil. Lol
 
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