Anything scary in here?

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Arachnopeon
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May 11, 2016
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My brothers finally moving to NYC on the 22nd so I am adopting his T's, he's given his KBT and OBT to a friend who has been keeping awhile so I'm hopefully not getting anything lethal! :):)

Anything to watch out for here? they are mostly smaller stuff.
sizes are rough diagonal legspan.
c.darlingi (6cm unkown)
c.schmidti dcf (13cm unk)
p.regalis (15cm female)
g.pulchripes (6cm unk)
p.ornata (20cm female)
p.vorax (2cm sling)
p.metallica (2cm sling)
N.chromatus (5cm unknown)

They are all coming in enclosures, and omg that ornata is huge!
I know it's prob not the best time for me to take them being new but he'd rather see them with me than to a shop (I treat my T's like small children :p )
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Yeah, you do have some hot T's on there, but you already seem to know that. P. ornata, C. darlingi, P. metallica, P. regalis...

I'm not saying that you aren't, but please take these seriously. Some of these tarantulas are potent enough to send grown men to the hospital - I'll let you imagine what they'd do to a child or animal.
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
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Dec 13, 2015
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Well you should deffo watch out for the poecs. They are fast as hell
Havent worked with some of them (the baboons) but N. chromatus and G. pulchripes are good begginers out of the bunch. The others not so much :/
 

Bread

Arachnopeon
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It's an opportunity for some learning :)

None of them need rehousing anytime soon so I've lots of time to get used to them and there behaviour.
 

Andrea82

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Actually, the only ones who are NOT scary are the chromatus and pulchripes. C.darlingi is not too bad, but the others...C.smithi (formerly Haplopelma) pack quite a punch venomwise. Be very, very sure what you're getting yourself into. It might be worth considering to sell them if you have any doubts towards keeping them.
 

WeightedAbyss75

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Careful of the C. schmidti. That will be one of the cool, reclusive, and aggresive of all of them IMO. Btw, so awesome that you get all of these semi-rare old worlds (*cough, cough free P. metallica). As long as you be as careful as you can and do research, I think you'll have a fun time with them. Also, no tarantula is really lethal unless you are allergic to the venom. What you need to worry about is them biting you and them getting hurt in the fray. Good luck though!
 

WeightedAbyss75

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Feb 22, 2014
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921
My brothers finally moving to NYC on the 22nd so I am adopting his T's, he's given his KBT and OBT to a friend who has been keeping awhile so I'm hopefully not getting anything lethal! :):)

Anything to watch out for here? they are mostly smaller stuff.
sizes are rough diagonal legspan.
c.darlingi (6cm unkown)
c.schmidti dcf (13cm unk)
p.regalis (15cm female)
g.pulchripes (6cm unk)
p.ornata (20cm female)
p.vorax (2cm sling)
p.metallica (2cm sling)
N.chromatus (5cm unknown)

They are all coming in enclosures, and omg that ornata is huge!
I know it's prob not the best time for me to take them being new but he'd rather see them with me than to a shop (I treat my T's like small children :p )
On a side note, love your profile picture. OBTs will be after your head though, eating a giant orange spider :mad: At least more so than usual for them...
 

edesign

AB FB Group Moderatr
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What the heck is a KBT?

Actually, the only ones who are NOT scary are the chromatus and pulchripes. C.darlingi is not too bad, but the others...C.smithi (formerly Haplopelma) pack quite a punch venomwise. Be very, very sure what you're getting yourself into. It might be worth considering to sell them if you have any doubts towards keeping them.
Agreed (N. chromatus can be pretty defensive though and like to kick hairs). Not only are you a beginner but you're a beginner who is practically diving in with OW's. Occasionally a beginner will ask about buying an OW and are pretty much told bad idea. Sometimes they get one anyway. Sometimes it works out ok. Sometimes not so well. Feeding them and watching them in their tanks is not going to prepare you for interacting with them if/when they need rehousing which is why it's often beneficial to start with slings and grow your experience as they get bigger. Keeping them to make your brother feel better is great and all but if you get bit by one of the hot ones he may wind up feeling guilty and you may be scared away from them permanently. Bites from some OW's are not a joke. Have you read the P. ornata bite reports here (robc's was a doozy, 10" female tagged him...he has a YT video that he made just after being bit too)? Here's a link:

http://arachnoboards.com/threads/poecilotheria-ornata.1901/

I posted this in the FB group but I'll repost here. Might make another thread about it as it has some good info. Some people had symptoms that lasted for years.

"Symptom in search of a toxin: muscle spasms following bites by Old World tarantula spiders (Lampropelma nigerrimum, Pterinochilus murinus, Poecilotheria regalis) with review"
http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/102/12/851

You have no Stromatopelma calceatums in your list but this is also an excellent write up from a field trip to collect them regarding some people who were bitten in the process. Author believes at least one may have died had they not received medical attention. Read how he got bit and where too, poor guy, didn't even have anything to do with trying to catch the tarantula. Collateral damage.

"I am sure that, without the immediate intervention of a primed and ready venom extraction kit, this young fellow might well have died. His throat was swollen and the pain radiated to his face, optical nerves, chest with heart contractions starting less than two hours after the bite, with the pain spreading downwards to his gonads..... a most horrible place to feel that kind of pain.
The heart contractions ceased after another hour and forty minutes. The aspivenin kit had been used within 40 seconds and was used for forty minutes, no doubt bruising the area around the bite. I tried to reassure the victim as best I could, and was relieved to hear him say that the pain was receding...six hours and a half after the bite had been inflicted.
In later days, the soldier was off-duty for a week, and when I left he still complained that his neck and throat area sometimes felt slightly painful."
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/stromatopelma-bites.5832/

OW spiders are far faster than you can react (New World as well when hunting or defending themselves but typically they don't run around like OWs can). They can run laps around the tanks before you can react.

Also, no tarantula is really lethal unless you are allergic to the venom.
Afaik there are no tarantula allergies. You won't go in to anaphylactic shock from a tarantula bite. You can, however, have serious infections resulting from bacteria and stuff in/on the fangs that gets left behind after a bite.
 

cold blood

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. Have you read the P. ornata bite reports here (robc's was a doozy, 10" female tagged him...he has a YT video that he made just after being bit too)? Here's a link:

http://arachnoboards.com/threads/poecilotheria-ornata.1901/

If that ornata was 10" I'll eat my hat. People often like to exaggerate size, but sometimes I see things that just make me shake my head and laugh....the only people he's fooling with that one are people that just don't know any better...lol.
 

WeightedAbyss75

Arachnoangel
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
921
What the heck is a KBT?



Agreed (N. chromatus can be pretty defensive though and like to kick hairs). Not only are you a beginner but you're a beginner who is practically diving in with OW's. Occasionally a beginner will ask about buying an OW and are pretty much told bad idea. Sometimes they get one anyway. Sometimes it works out ok. Sometimes not so well. Feeding them and watching them in their tanks is not going to prepare you for interacting with them if/when they need rehousing which is why it's often beneficial to start with slings and grow your experience as they get bigger. Keeping them to make your brother feel better is great and all but if you get bit by one of the hot ones he may wind up feeling guilty and you may be scared away from them permanently. Bites from some OW's are not a joke. Have you read the P. ornata bite reports here (robc's was a doozy, 10" female tagged him...he has a YT video that he made just after being bit too)? Here's a link:

http://arachnoboards.com/threads/poecilotheria-ornata.1901/

I posted this in the FB group but I'll repost here. Might make another thread about it as it has some good info. Some people had symptoms that lasted for years.

"Symptom in search of a toxin: muscle spasms following bites by Old World tarantula spiders (Lampropelma nigerrimum, Pterinochilus murinus, Poecilotheria regalis) with review"
http://qjmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/102/12/851

You have no Stromatopelma calceatums in your list but this is also an excellent write up from a field trip to collect them regarding some people who were bitten in the process. Author believes at least one may have died had they not received medical attention. Read how he got bit and where too, poor guy, didn't even have anything to do with trying to catch the tarantula. Collateral damage.


http://arachnoboards.com/threads/stromatopelma-bites.5832/

OW spiders are far faster than you can react (New World as well when hunting or defending themselves but typically they don't run around like OWs can). They can run laps around the tanks before you can react.



Afaik there are no tarantula allergies. You won't go in to anaphylactic shock from a tarantula bite. You can, however, have serious infections resulting from bacteria and stuff in/on the fangs that gets left behind after a bite.
Never knew. I hear it all the time from people, and I'm not willing to test the theory with my bee sting allergy. Just looked it up, good to know. I just hope the OP can do well with the T's. Personally, I would try to care for them instead of sell them right away. In my LIMITED experience, as long as you expect the worst and prepare for it, it turns out pretty well. Always feed them in a place you can easily catch them, don't leave the whole cage lid off, etc. This is to the OP, it would be awesome if you could send us pics once you get them. OWs are my favorite :D
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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5,671
I have nothing to say because of those two reasons.

1) The Goddess and the Prophet went straight in the pockets of that friend, without you fighting with all of your strenght for those lovely? :rage:

2) Lethal? The Goddess? 0.1 Pelinobius muticus is the most benign Theraphosidae ever :pompous:
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Messages
3,289
If that ornata was 10" I'll eat my hat. People often like to exaggerate size, but sometimes I see things that just make me shake my head and laugh....the only people he's fooling with that one are people that just don't know any better...lol.
You're just jealous of my 12" T. stirmi.

In all seriousness, as if size even matters. An adult pokie of any size would be extremely painful.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,671
It's an opportunity for some learning :)

None of them need rehousing anytime soon so I've lots of time to get used to them and there behaviour.
Yes indeed you will learn something. Just keep in mind always their speed, use long tongs, be careful, and nothing bad will happens. They aren't that bad at the end. 'Pokies' in general prefer to retreat rather than "fight". Those hardcore burrowers if (this detail I don't know of course) they were proper housed with an helluva of substrate like I love to do, again in general, they tend to remain "under" during maintenance time.

Enjoy your new T's, be careful.

P.S

The lucky one is that friend of yours, he earned a Goddess and a Prophet, pure Royal Flush at it's finest.
 

edesign

AB FB Group Moderatr
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Apr 23, 2004
Messages
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Thanks...I don't see that used too often, didn't look familiar ha

If that ornata was 10" I'll eat my hat. People often like to exaggerate size, but sometimes I see things that just make me shake my head and laugh....the only people he's fooling with that one are people that just don't know any better...lol.
Right. We're all idiots. Thanks for clearing that up. Let me break it down as to why it's not unbelievable. Maybe get some bbq sauce to put on your hat, just in case.

They get huge, larger than most T's adult size, and it was a very big one that bit him. Since you brought up the idea that he's probably lying, watch his video trying to rehouse the L. violaceopes (or whatever genus its in now,
)

He says it's 8" and it's smaller compared to his hand than the ornata (link below). My fingerspread is exactly 7" from middle fingertip to thumb tip and my hands aren't that big. Certainly not as big as his judging by his size, he says his hands are just under 10". If he has an 8" spider that's on video, that looks all of 8", I don't doubt he knows how to measure two more inches (or 1 3/4", maybe it's a 1/4" shy) :rolleyes: But, rulers or something of scale to reference would be best. Maybe if we ask nice he'll submit a photo of his hand next to a ruler to settle it once and for all :)

This is the ornata he is referring to. FF to 0:55, he puts his hand up for reference, leg I is a bit hard to see but it extends quite a ways down. I guarantee his hands are larger than mine. Even when you mentally re-position his hand to be even with the legs it's still the size of his hand. His middle fingertip looks about 2" above the end of the rear legs. The front legs are more than 2" below the end of his palm. Come to your own conclusion. Regardless, that's a huge spider and we all know that larger spiders can inject more venom (my original point in posting):
 

smiittyy

Arachnosquire
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Sep 8, 2015
Messages
125
Never underestimate an old world fossorial tarantulas abilty to come fliying out of it burrow and tag you. Even new world tarantulas can react faster than you can move your hand, the difference is that when you start with NW's you sorta learn the do's and don'ts of tarantulas with a less toxic specie, and if a mistake is made the consequences arnt as severe. When you start with the OW's you will be learning about the taranulas from scratch, and if a bite happens the pain is going to be severe if they're adult specimens.

Learn to fill water bowls with straws and syringes, when removing water bowls to clean use tongs, remove bolus with tongs. Basically do everything with tongs or tools, except feeding.

I myself have a bad habit of feeding with tongs and wouldnt suggest it. More than once ive had to stand there holding on to the tongs while a tarantula(who had already started up the tongs)decided weather or not it was food. Just toss the roach or feeder in. My advice also is to stick to prey that cant harm your tarantula, that means no mealworms or superworms. That will save you from have to dig apart an enclosure looking for that escaped mealworm.
 

cold blood

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Thanks...I don't see that used too often, didn't look familiar ha



Right. We're all idiots. Thanks for clearing that up. Let me break it down as to why it's not unbelievable. Maybe get some bbq sauce to put on your hat, just in case.

They get huge, larger than most T's adult size, and it was a very big one that bit him. Since you brought up the idea that he's probably lying, watch his video trying to rehouse the L. violaceopes (or whatever genus its in now,
)

He says it's 8" and it's smaller compared to his hand than the ornata (link below). My fingerspread is exactly 7" from middle fingertip to thumb tip and my hands aren't that big. Certainly not as big as his judging by his size, he says his hands are just under 10". If he has an 8" spider that's on video, that looks all of 8", I don't doubt he knows how to measure two more inches (or 1 3/4", maybe it's a 1/4" shy) :rolleyes: But, rulers or something of scale to reference would be best. Maybe if we ask nice he'll submit a photo of his hand next to a ruler to settle it once and for all :)

This is the ornata he is referring to. FF to 0:55, he puts his hand up for reference, leg I is a bit hard to see but it extends quite a ways down. I guarantee his hands are larger than mine. Even when you mentally re-position his hand to be even with the legs it's still the size of his hand. His middle fingertip looks about 2" above the end of the rear legs. The front legs are more than 2" below the end of his palm. Come to your own conclusion. Regardless, that's a huge spider and we all know that larger spiders can inject more venom (my original point in posting):
Show it next to a ruler, not a hand...I can take a pic of my hand and an elephant and make them look the same size.

And for the record, I called it an exaggeration, not a lie. Exaggerations aren't always intentional.
 
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