Anyone still handling Ts?

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
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Jan 15, 2017
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IMG_1543.JPG Hey everyone,

Just curious about how many people on here still insist on handling their Ts. Because we just experienced an unnecessary casualty...... among MANY in this hobby!

We bring live animals into college biology labs during the Arthropoda chapter. I'm one of the instructors who has taken a vow of NO HANDLING, and for good reason! Especially around nervous students. I show them their beauty, and I teach about their biology..... ALL of which can be accomplished without handling. But some instructors have their students handle these tarantulas, and the inevitable has happened.

A 10-year old rosie just spent the last 24 hours slowly suffering to death.

RIP Janessa! You didn't deserve this:sorry:
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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I fail to realize why certain people into T's feel that damned rapture urge need to show & bring T's to an audience of people, kids or not, that 8 out of 10 give a <crap> about at the end of the day.

IMO the less 'strangers', noise, cheap talk about our inverts, the better.

This is garbage, on my book, not "education".

 
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Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
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I fail to realize why certain people into T's feel that damned rapture urge need to show & bring T's to an audience of people, kids or not, that 8 out of 10 give a <crap> about at the end of the day.

IMO the less 'strangers', noise, cheap talk about our inverts, the better.

This is garbage, on my book, not "education".

You're making it seem like we're running a carnival here. This is a college biology course for biology majors. Cool your jets!
 
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Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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You're making it seem like we're running a carnival here. This is a college biology course for biology majors. Cool your jets!
That's my opinion, 'sorry' if that hurts your feelings. I didn't said that you (you) are in bad faith. Mine was a, 360°, view/opinion about that practice I find useless, annoying and whatnot like if certain T's keepers need to prove to someone that asked nothing, how much 'harmless' and etc are the (weird for the average) animals they love to keep.

You can cover that with a 'perfume' of science all you want.

Carnival at least is funny because carnival can into 'naked ladies' like in Brazil and New Orleans :-s
 

Devin B

Arachnobaron
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Im glad you posted this only because a novice may find this if they search google about handling spiders. This will show them how dangerous it is for a T.
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
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That's my opinion, 'sorry' if that hurts your feelings. I didn't said that you (you) are in bad faith. Mine was a, 360°, view/opinion about that practice I find useless, annoying and whatnot like if certain T's keepers need to prove to someone that asked nothing, how much 'harmless' and etc are the (weird for the average) animals they love to keep.

You can cover that with a 'perfume' of science all you want.

Carnival at least is funny because carnival can into 'naked ladies' like in Brazil and New Orleans :-s
Wow! Ok, I'll play along with you.

Just fyi, we don't bring them to "show them off" or show them how "harmless" they are. We bring them because live animals happen to be quite a bit more interesting than dried and pickled specimens in jars. And if you actually read my post, I don't handle them, nor do I support it. When I teach, the animals remain in their enclosures. If they wish to view them closer, I hand them a flashlight so they can see them in their hides.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Wow! Ok, I'll play along with you.

Just fyi, we don't bring them to "show them off" or show them how "harmless" they are. We bring them because live animals happen to be quite a bit more interesting than dried and pickled specimens in jars. And if you actually read my post, I don't handle them, nor do I support it. When I teach, the animals remain in their enclosures. If they wish to view them closer, I hand them a flashlight so they can see them in their hides.
Again, I wasn't talking about you. I was talking with you. Different. I'm certain that you are in good faith. Do you can say the same about others, tout court? No.

I was talking about 'showing T's' at 360°, no matter if in the U.S for a biology course or in Switzerland for "overcome" arachnophobia or what else: a lot of that, if not majority, ends with "handling" involved. As your first post stated.

And for me that's not "education" but garbage, a sort of show off without the dignity and weird bizarre appeal that, at least, Barnum Circus or 'Believe It or Not' Museums had :-s
 

Sin

Arachnopeon
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RIP Janessa! It's extremely unfortunate that this happened to her.
 
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Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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RIP Janessa! It'shouldn't extremely unfortunate that this happened to her.
To her or to another Theraphosidae... there's a particular difference? IMO just the next Theraphosidae that died for nothing.
 

Jeff23

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The food processing industry does it. Why can't biology class? Both are done to benefit humans in ways different than the hobby.

I suspect the ones used are available in quantity just like the ones mentioned in the other thread for food. All is okay.:p
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
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Well, one could argue that the hobby is a benefit to humans as well. You're not exactly doing the spiders any favors by keeping them. Ever put your head in a box? Vibrations and noises are amplified in boxes.

And biologists, as a matter of pure fact, are essential to the hobby. Nearly everything we know about Ts, and nature in general, comes from biological research. All those scientific names we use? Biologists described them.

And I'm certain that a majority of T hobbyists (myself included) got into the hobby after being fascinated by a live animal.

This thread is intended to discourage handling, NOT to put all biologists into a bin of evil. Keep an open mind, folks! If you start ripping on biologists here, this site is going to lose a lot of members.
 

SpiderInTheBath

Arachnosquire
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I used to do it as a job, and I didn't agree with it. We didn't let the punters hold them, and I would sit on the floor to do it -- not my spiders, not my decision. I don't handle my own and I don't have that job any more. I credit it with fostering my interest in them, but since the spiders themselves don't benefit from the interaction I don't see a reason to do it.

My jumping spiders, on the other hand, do quite like to come out and see me! They are great fun and I handle the ones that are happy to come up.
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
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I used to do it as a job, and I didn't agree with it. We didn't let the punters hold them, and I would sit on the floor to do it -- not my spiders, not my decision. I don't handle my own and I don't have that job any more. I credit it with fostering my interest in them, but since the spiders themselves don't benefit from the interaction I don't see a reason to do it.

My jumping spiders, on the other hand, do quite like to come out and see me! They are great fun and I handle the ones that are happy to come up.
The tarantulas don't benefit from handling for the food industry either, but they don't have a choice. It is to benefit humans. One can even argue that tarantulas provide positive mental feelings to people who handle them if they are ignorant of the situation for the tarantula. This whole area of discussion seems to all relate to being selective on what we choose to be acceptable.

I don't know much about jumping spiders, but they can literally see us and jump off of our arm/hand without harm more easily. I would suspect the ones that cooperate probably are not in fear of the handling similar to a tarantula. I have thought about searching for one in my area a few times, but the length of their life and time to learn how to keep them has stopped me.
 

Chris LXXIX

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And biologists, as a matter of pure fact, are essential to the hobby. Nearly everything we know about Ts, and nature in general, comes from biological research. All those scientific names we use? Biologists described them.

And I'm certain that a majority of T hobbyists (myself included) got into the hobby after being fascinated by a live animal.

This thread is intended to discourage handling, NOT to put all biologists into a bin of evil. Keep an open mind, folks! If you start ripping on biologists here, this site is going to lose a lot of members.
Who is against biologists, one moment? Not me. I only say that, biologist or not, the very moment that "you" (please note the " " because ain't talking about you) ends with a Theraphosidae smashed on the floor because "you" let said T/T's in the hands of childrens (or adults, for that matter) like nothing, "you" aren't on my book that much credible, even if said biologist is the Jesus of biology.

As a personal opinion (and I repeat, personal opinion) I think that enters always, sadly, a bit of show off attitude during that lessons (maybe not with you, ok).

Otherwise I wonder why, when Italy was a Kingdom and Tamerlan Thorell (not exactly the first stupid of the street) reached Genova city for study arachnids with Giacomo Doria at his museum, they didn't jumped into KOI* schools handling/showing spiders for the sake of science & knowledge :-s

* Kingdom Of Italy
 

SpiderInTheBath

Arachnosquire
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Jumpers are very intelligent, and make really good pets! They are not very long-lived, but I've had an adult female P. regius for 1 year now and she's still (so far) in good health. I'm new to the hobby, but you can see them assessing new situations and they definitely seem to learn. The same AF I have will come to the front of the enclosure to receive her food directly, even, and I have seen them looking at the television, exploring new enclosure decor, etc, in a way that tarantulas just don't seem to do.

They are agile and don't have the weight a terrestrial tarantula does, and they also leave behind a bungee cable of silk that you need to proactively break as they move over your hands. If they fall, they dangle for the most part. A gravid or fat one would be at higher risk of damage that way.

I definitely saw the benefit of educating people about spiders, so I'm not sure I agree with the idea above that it's worthless -- not just for biologists, either. We were able to talk about the environment, what spiders contribute, how they live, how some species are endangered due to the pet trade, and yes, how easily damaged they are if they're dropped. There was almost always one idiot who just wanted cool points (and never got them), but for the most part it invited the sort of curiosity that just seeing them in your house doesn't. It always helps if someone passionate is there to talk about it, and while I probably could have done the same job without taking the spider out of the box it was my boss's mandate, and that's what we advertised, so it was how it was.

Talking about spider behaviour is a step towards conquering phobias, too, because just managing people's expectations is half the battle (no, it's not going to lunge at you like a facehugger).

I'm not sure I get the food industry argument, though. I don't have any control over the food industry, nor any real means to challenge it effectively, but I can make choices for myself and the animals I've chosen to look after. More than that, after handling I'm itchy and never remember not to touch my eye :p
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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The tarantulas don't benefit from handling for the food industry either, but they don't have a choice. It is to benefit humans. One can even argue that tarantulas provide positive mental feelings to people who handle them if they are ignorant of the situation for the tarantula. This whole area of discussion seems to all relate to being selective on what we choose to be acceptable.
I love the irony :kiss:
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
Joined
Jul 27, 2016
Messages
621
Jumpers are very intelligent, and make really good pets! They are not very long-lived, but I've had an adult female P. regius for 1 year now and she's still (so far) in good health. I'm new to the hobby, but you can see them assessing new situations and they definitely seem to learn. The same AF I have will come to the front of the enclosure to receive her food directly, even, and I have seen them looking at the television, exploring new enclosure decor, etc, in a way that tarantulas just don't seem to do.

They are agile and don't have the weight a terrestrial tarantula does, and they also leave behind a bungee cable of silk that you need to proactively break as they move over your hands. If they fall, they dangle for the most part. A gravid or fat one would be at higher risk of damage that way.

I definitely saw the benefit of educating people about spiders, so I'm not sure I agree with the idea above that it's worthless -- not just for biologists, either. We were able to talk about the environment, what spiders contribute, how they live, how some species are endangered due to the pet trade, and yes, how easily damaged they are if they're dropped. There was almost always one idiot who just wanted cool points (and never got them), but for the most part it invited the sort of curiosity that just seeing them in your house doesn't. It always helps if someone passionate is there to talk about it, and while I probably could have done the same job without taking the spider out of the box it was my boss's mandate, and that's what we advertised, so it was how it was.

Talking about spider behaviour is a step towards conquering phobias, too, because just managing people's expectations is half the battle (no, it's not going to lunge at you like a facehugger).

I'm not sure I get the food industry argument, though. I don't have any control over the food industry, nor any real means to challenge it effectively, but I can make choices for myself and the animals I've chosen to look after. More than that, after handling I'm itchy and never remember not to touch my eye :p
Thank you for sharing that information. We don't have tarantulas in my area, but have lots of jumping spiders. I wish I had more time to go search for a few and care for them.

My comment about the food industry actually doesn't relate to your comment but does relate to the thread. I probably should have separated it. It also comes from discussion in another thread in this forum and part of my argument in it.
 
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