anybody know what species this tarantlua is

dogbizkit

Arachnopeon
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We were hiking is the superstiton mountains between apache jct and globe. We were on the highest peak. When I came across this T. it has about a 2" leg span. I'm kinda puzzled because it has tibial hooks looks like a juv. but the hooks are throwing me off. Not sure if this is a dwarf species. any info would be great.
 

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Trogdora

Arachnosquire
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Well, it's an Aphonopelma species. Possibly behlei. Hopefully someone who knows more about this genus can get you farther.
 

captmarga

Arachnobaron
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Mar 31, 2010
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Someone recently posted about another tarantula in NM, similar coloration and size, also a MM (with tibial hooks). I'm quite interested to see if there is a new dwarf species of black Ts!

Thanks for posting the photo!

Marga
 

Redneck

Arachnoprince
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Is there a chance that is not a dwarf specie? MMs can mature at a really small size..
 

captmarga

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At only two inches? I've had MM hentzi/anax males for over 20 years (my last two having just lost last month), and never seen one that small. I've seen countless thousands of them on the roads, the college campus (one year it was literally a carpet of Ts) and none were significantly smaller than 3" - what I consider to be about normal for that species. (And yes, I am looking at a ruler, and several Ts with 2" and 3" legspans at the moment.)

Marga
 

AzJohn

Arachnoking
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Hello, my folks live in Superior. I know that part of the state real well. That's not one of the Arizona Dwarf species. MM are very small. I've seen a MM A paloma that would fit nicely on a dime. It shouldn't be behlei. They live at higher altitudes and in a very different environment, pine\oak woodlands. It is probably a similar/related species to behlei however. Behlei breed Oct\Nov and a MM would be about the same size. How high up were you and what kind of environment were you in?

John
 

Arachnopal

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Nov 7, 2010
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I just sent off a little guy real close to this 1 from the Huachucha mountains to Dr. Brent Hendrixson in Jackson Ms. He was very excited to receive the sample to help straighten out the names in this state.
 
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Great Basin Ben

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Oct 2, 2010
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Aphonopelma sp. "paramoguli"/"hualapai"

Although the taxonomic names, Aphonopelma paramoguli, and Aphonopelma hualapai, are NOT yet legitimized nomenclature, essentially, they represent somewhat isolated colonies, of what is currently believed to be an Eastern Dwarf Aphonopelma mojave. (often referred to as the Eastern Mojave Complex). They are rarely seen for sale, but when offered, will sometimes have a name associated to them, specific to their collection locality, and it will look something like: "Aphonopelma sp. "hualapai". Another example of an Arizona dwarf offered in this manner is Aphonopelma sp. "cochise", again, indicative, of it's type locality.

The (3) legitimate dwarf Aphonopelma, recognized, by peer reviewed science, are Aphonopelma, mojave, (as mentioned), the Aphonopelma joshua, and the considerably smaller Aphonopelma paloma. There are likely to be many more species discovered someday, and there's even a question, if the true dwarfs, might even belong to a Genus, all their own, but for the time being, a Dwarf North American Aphonopelma, will probably fall into one of these (3) complexes.

With that said, I'd venture my guess, that your little guy, falls into the described Eastern Mojave complex. Hopefully, there will continue to be further clarification, as the age of information grows, and the popularity of Dwarf Aphonopelma in the hobby, grows along side of it. Excellent find. Too bad you didn't have a ready and waiting female for him. Thank you very much for sharing. I ABSOLUTELY LOVE seeing the dwarfs!!!

---------- Post added at 07:49 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:35 PM ----------

...he looks VERY much like a Mature Male version of my female Aphonopelma sp. "paramogoli". As there is yet to be further clarification, as to whether or not "paramogoli" will be eventually recognized, by science, it too, is an Easten Mojave Complex (for now) species. The colors, urticating hairs, size, are ALL practically identical to those of the Aphonopelma sp. "paramogoli", and likely VERY similar to what is commonly called, Aphonopelma sp. "hualapai".

Again though, MANY THANKS for showing him off!
 

josh_r

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I have seen behlei males very small, but not 2 inches. Thats small! The very round carapace suggests to me it is probably more geared toward a behlei type spider however. The dwarf species found in most of arizona have a more oval carapace while the behlei type spiders tend to be much more round. It looks VERY similar to every behlei male I have seen aside from that small size. Strange.

There are very high elevation populations of paloma which I have found at around 6000' but I have yet to see a male. I assume they are similar to the low elevation males that I have seen. Maybe this could be it??

It is definitely a high elevation spider. One thing that is pretty consistent with the high elevation species is the stockyness and the excessively hairy look. The paloma I have found above 6000' have been excessively hairy compared to the lower elevation populations. I would go back to the spot you found it and see if you can find a female. Would be cool to see what female goes with that male :)
 
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